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Youngest children within their school year are more likely to be treated for ADHD, says new study

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A new study by experts from the University of Nottingham shows that children younger than their peers in the school year are more likely to be treated for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), suggesting that immaturity can affect diagnosis origin.

The study, published in BMC Public Healthlooked at the link between age and ADHD, with health and education data linkages from over 1 million children in Scotland and Wales.

The study was led by experts at the University of Swansea and the University of Glasgow, along with colleagues from the University of Nottingham.

Evidence suggests that worldwide, the prevalence of ADHD among school-aged children is about three to five percent, on average. However, there are significant differences worldwide in the cost of clinical diagnosis and treatment.

Previous studies have found an association between age in the school year and ADHD, especially in countries where the majority of children suffer from ADHD. This latest study aims to look at whether the same is true in the UK, where authorization costs are low. Another important goal is to check whether allowing flexibility around school start dates can reduce the impact of this so-called “family age effect” – so that adults can compare younger children over their older peers in the group. one year and they show immaturity for serious problems.

Scotland and Wales have different school admission dates (which are between six months) and the policy of keeping children behind the school year. Comparing the two countries thus allows for a useful natural test to examine the relationship between age in the school year and ADHD, and whether it influences child retention policies.

The team of experts included education and health data of 1,063,256 primary and secondary children in Scotland (between 2009 and 2013) and Wales (between 2009 and 2016), to examine the relationship between age in the school year and to treat ADHD (i.e., get me remedy for ADHD).

Overall, 0.87% of children in the study were treated for ADHD. The team found that in Wales, children who were the youngest in their class were more likely to be given medication for ADHD. Of course, this effect is covered in Scotland as it is seen to be very flexible, so that young children in the school year with care or supervision. behavioral problems they are more likely to be held back for a year.

Kapil Sayal, Professor of Pediatric Psychiatry & Nottingham Psychiatry at Lifd and Center for Psychiatry at the Center for Neurology, a senior medical author.

He said, “The findings of this study have a number of disadvantages for teachers, parents and doctors. immaturity. This may cause younger children in the class to be more likely to be diagnosed and receive treatment for ADHD.

“Regardless of the date set for admission to school, your month of birth should not be affected whether you have been diagnosed or given treatment for ADHD. Parents, teachers and administered doctors and the study of ADHD should take into account the age of the child in school years: School year: In terms of education, there should be flexibility with a specific approach to [what] the best fulfillment of the child’s educational and moral needs. Our research shows that when there is greater flexibility, less in school year ADHD will never be treated again. ”


The school age ‘relative age’ leads to discrimination in the diagnosis of ADHD, according to the study


Learn more:
Michael Fleming et al, Years in the school year with poor attention span in Scotland and Wales, BMC Public Health (2022). DOI: 10.1186 / s12889-022-13453-w

hint: Young children in their school year more likely to be treated for ADHD, says new study (2022, June 30) retrieved June 30, 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-06- youngest-children-school- Shekara-adhd.html

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