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What were Japanese internment camps?

Project Community is an ongoing program across Hearst Television to shed light on different voices in our communities. This initiative was built with a regular coverage of people working to bring about change and stories that provide a detailed account of the history of the war for Human Rights, integration and social change across the country. United States. Two months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt issued an executive order. 9066. The order ordered the Army to gather “enemy” on the west coast. More than 100,000 Japanese nationals have been forced from their homes and sent to prison camps. More than half are children and most are U.S. citizens. The internment lasted from 1942 until the end of the war. Hundreds died while being treated for illness and violence. Activists fight in court. Japanese-American Fred Korematsu refused to be detained and appealed to the Supreme Court in 1944. Korematsu’s sentence was overturned 40 years later in 1983. Five years later, President Ronald Regan signed the Civil Rights Act 1988. The bill officially apologized. for camp survivors and $ 20,000 was given to each victim. This video is the second in a series of four clarified Clarified episodes shown during the Asian American, Hawaiian National, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) to educate viewers on the contributions, experiences and heroes of the American Asian community. .

Project Community is an ongoing program across Hearst Television to shed light on different voices in our communities. This initiative is built on the regular coverage of people working to bring about change and stories that provide a comprehensive overview of the history of the human rights movement, integration and social change across the United States.

Two months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066. The order instructed the Army to gather “black enemies” on the West Bank.

More than 100,000 Japanese nationals have been forced from their homes and sent to prison camps. More than half are children and most are U.S. citizens.

The internment lasted from 1942 until the end of the war. Hundreds died while being treated for illness and violence.

Activists fight in court. Japanese-American Fred Korematsu refused to be detained and filed a complaint with the Supreme Court in 1944.

Korematsu’s sentence was overturned after 40 years in 1983.

Five years later, President Ronald Regan signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1988. The bill officially apologizes to the camp survivors and gives $ 20,000 to each victim.


This video is the second in a series of four episodes by It is explained Launched in Asia-America, Hawaii National, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) Month to educate viewers on the contributions, experiences and heroes of the Asian American community.

What were Japanese internment camps? Source link What were Japanese internment camps?

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