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What is Trooping the Colour?

The Queen’s annual birthday parade, Trooping the Color, is fast approaching. This year’s event is also special, as it is one of the opening events of the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee, a multi-day celebration of the record-breaking reign of Elizabeth II. Here’s what you need to know about the annual royal event, from the story to how you can watch the whole thing go downhill. History The tradition dates back to King George II, who in 1748 combined the annual summer military course with a birthday party – although he was born in October. Since then, the royal monarch has had the option of having a formal birthday in the summer. So what exactly does “recruit color” mean? Back in 1700, the various regiments displayed their flags, so all troops would recognize their banners during battle. Hence, “recruiting” the “color”. That’s why the queen has two birthdays. It’s basically every child’s dream come true. On April 21, the actual day of her birth, Elizabeth II celebrates privately, but on June 2 she will publicly mark her “official” birthday with a parade. It all depends on the weather. Summer is the only time for a proper parade. The parade During the parade, the queen will inspect her troops. For years he did it on horseback, but since 1987 he goes in a carriage. According to the Telegraph, the annual event is attended not only by 1,500 officers and men, but also by 244 horses. For a cool 360-degree video of the show a few years ago, check out the following: Appearing on the balcony A key part of the Trooping the Color tradition is appearing on the balcony of the royal family. While the royal family occasionally gathers on the balcony of Buckingham Palace for reasons other than the birthday parade, Trooping the Color is the only guaranteed annual appearance, usually with the largest group. The guests usually include the queen’s descendants, her sister and her cousins, plus their husbands. The group often reaches 30+, and for the Queen’s 90th birthday in 2016, more than 40 members of the family gathered. But this year, only working members of the royal family and their children will appear on the balcony, namely Sussex and the Prince Andreas will be excluded.

The Queen’s annual birthday parade, Trooping the Color, is fast approaching. This year’s event is also special, as it is one of the opening events of the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee, a multi-day celebration of the record-breaking reign of Elizabeth II. Here’s what you need to know about the annual royal event, from the story to how you can watch the whole thing go downhill.

The History

The tradition dates back to King George II, who in 1748 combined the annual summer military course with the celebration of his birthday – although he was born in October. Since then, the royal monarch has had the option of having a formal birthday in the summer.

So what exactly does “militarizing color” mean?

Back in 1700, the various regiments displayed their flags, so all troops would recognize their banners during battle. Hence, “army” in the “color”.

That’s why the queen has two birthdays

It’s basically every child’s dream come true. On April 21, the actual day of her birth, Elizabeth II celebrates privately, but on June 2 she will publicly mark her “official” birthday with a parade.

It all depends on the weather. Summer is the only time for a proper parade.

The parade

During the parade, the queen will inspect her troops. For years he did it on horseback, but since 1987 he goes in a carriage.

According to TelegraphThe characteristics of the annual event not only 1,500 officers and men, but also 244 horses.

For a cool 360 degree video from the beauty pageants a few years ago, watch the following:

The appearance of the balcony

A key part of the Trooping the Color tradition is the appearance of the royal family balcony. While the royal family occasionally gathers on the balcony of Buckingham Palace for reasons other than the birthday parade, Trooping the Color is the only guaranteed annual appearance and usually the one with the largest group.

The guests usually include the Queen’s descendants, her sister and cousins, as well as their husbands. The group often reaches 30+ and for the Queen’s 90th birthday in 2016, more than 40 family members gathered.

But this year, only working members of the royal family and their children will show up on the balcony, which means Sussex and Prince Andrew will be barred.

What is Trooping the Colour? Source link What is Trooping the Colour?

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