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Weekend rain helped NorCal reservoirs, but drought impacts remain

Despite the help of historic weekend rains and healthy snow in Sierra, California still has a long way to go until the end of the drought. Reservoir levels throughout the state remain low, and according to KCRA3 chief meteorologist Mark Finan, an important indicator of where the drought situation is. On Sunday alone, Sacramento recorded the highest rainfall ever, with 5.44 inches of rainfall. Looking at this, Finan said daily rainfall is close to what is seen from October to December. “It rained almost three months in a day,” Finan said. Recently, the area of ​​Northern California has been wet with rain, but there is a way to go before the reservoir still looks healthy. Some reservoirs withstand water levels after rain Folsom Lake has a capacity of 27%, despite an increase in capacity of 12 feet. Shasta Lake’s capacity is 22%, up 3 feet. The New Melon Reservoir, which holds 2.4 million acre feet, is up 1 foot and has a capacity of 37%. The country’s tallest dam, the Oroville Dam, has risen 33 feet, but Finan explains that it can be misleading. Since the dam itself is V-shaped, the rise in water level can appear to be sharper than it really is. Currently, the capacity is 26%. Interview with State Water Officials Dave Rizzardo is the Hydrology Section Manager of the California Department of Water Resources. He said the recent weather was refreshing and highly needed by the state, but he also commented on how serious the drought crisis was. That’s the ideal situation. ” Oroville alone would need at least an additional 2.5 million acre-foot to reach its highest water level, he said.

Despite the healthy help of weekend historic rains and Sierra snow, California still has a long way to go before the drought ends.

Reservoir levels throughout the state remain low, and according to KCRA3 chief meteorologist Mark Finan, these are important indicators of where the drought situation is.

On Sunday alone, Sacramento had the most rainfall on a calendar day in recorded history, with 5.44 inches of rainfall. To see this, Finan said that daily rainfall is close to what is seen from October to December.

“It rained almost three months in a day,” Finan said.

Despite the recent rain in this and other parts of Northern California, reservoirs still have a way to go before they look healthy.

Where some reservoirs stand at the water level after rain

At Folsom Lake, capacity is 27%, despite a 12-foot increase in capacity. Lake Shasta has a capacity of 22%, rising 3 feet.

The New Melon Reservoir, which holds 2.4 million acre feet, rises 1 foot and has a capacity of 37%.

The country’s tallest dam, the Oroville Dam, has risen 33 feet, but Finan explains that it can be misleading. Since the dam itself is V-shaped, the rise in water level can appear to be sharper than it really is. Currently, the capacity is 26%.

Interview with state water authorities

Dave Rizzardo is the Hydrology Section Manager of the California Department of Water Resources. He said the recent weather was refreshing and highly needed by the state, but he also commented on how serious the drought crisis was.

“We need a series of storms that we can handle (a good number this year), which would be an ideal situation,” Lizard said.

He said that Oroville alone would need at least an additional 2.5 million acre-foot just to bring the water level back to its highest level.

Weekend rain helped NorCal reservoirs, but drought impacts remain Source link Weekend rain helped NorCal reservoirs, but drought impacts remain

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