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War separates US native from Ukrainian wife

Nataliya Melnyk met Creighton University graduate Kellen Derry while teaching at a Ukrainian school in 2011. Derry visited Ukraine for European soccer, not for love. But after 11 years, the war and the love of her country separated the couple. From a small corner in the couple’s home in the Capitol of Kyiv in Ukraine, Melnyk shared her experiences with the Omaha sister station KETV and her husband through Zoom. “We got a rocket explosion near the center of the train station,” Melnyk said. “A lot of people are walking and sirens are always off.” She said the logs and weeds in the living room were the safest place for her and their cat, Mittens. She would not want to be anywhere. “I feel this is where I am now and where I want to be now,” she said. “I wanted her to go, and I made her want to be there and support the country she loves,” said her husband Kellen Derry. Melnyk, 32, and her husband Nebraska Derry, 36, were married in 2015 in Washington State Court. He came from Nebraska.Derry returned to Nebraska for business when Russia invaded Ukraine. They have not seen each other since February 1, when he left his home in Kyiv. “This is where I spent almost a third of my life,” Derry said. or drive it. But Melnyk says she needs to stay focused and do what she can, such as donating bottles of Molotov cocktails to protect civilians. she said. “I shed alcohol and donated glass bottles to an important event for my people.” Melnyk said it was important for Americans, Nebraskans to live their lives by informing them. She said her people would not fall on their knees. “We persevere as much as we can, hopefully we can. After we win, we will take our time to mourn and remember everyone,” Melnyk said. Derry says Ukrainians just want to protect their rights. “Ukrainians are no different from us,” he said. “They are a farming community. If anyone understands farming, they are Nebraska people.” Melnyk also said that another way people can help is by supporting different organizations. She said that for humanitarian aid, she had contributed to the International Rescue Committee.

Nataliya Melnyk met Kellen Derry who graduated from Creighton University while they were both teaching at a Ukrainian school in 2011.

Derry visited Ukraine for European football, not for love. But after 11 years, the war and the love of her country separated the couple.

From a small corner in the couple’s home in the Capitol of Kyiv in Ukraine, Melnyk shared her experiences with the Omaha sister station KETV and her husband through Zoom.

“We got a rocket explosion near the center of the train station,” Melnyk said. “A lot of people are walking and sirens are turning off the lights.”

She said the hole in the floor was the safest place for her and their cat, Mittens. She would not want to stay somewhere.

“I feel this is where I will be now and where I want to be now,” she said.

“I wanted her to go, and I made her want to be there and support the country she loves,” said her husband Kellen Derry.

Melnyk, 32, and her husband Nebraska Derry, 36, were married in 2015 in Washington State Court. He is from Nebraska.

Derry returned to Nebraska for business when Russia invaded Ukraine. They had not seen each other since February 1, when he left their home in Kyiv.

“It’s where I spend almost a third of my life,” he said.

Derry began looking for ways to return to his wife in Kyiv or evict her. But Melnyk says she needs to stay focused and do what she can, such as donating a bottle of Molotov cocktail to protect civilians.

“A lot of women are busy mixing and going around the neighborhood looking for glass bottles,” she said. “I shed alcohol and donated glass bottles to an important event for my community.”

Melnyk said it is important for Americans, Nebraskans to survive by being informed. She said her people would not fall on their knees.

“We persevere to the best of our ability, hopefully we can. After we win, we will take our time to mourn and remember every single person,” Melnyk said.

Derry says Ukrainians want to maintain their independence.

“Ukrainians are no different from us,” he said. “They are a farming community. If anyone understands farming, they are Nebraska people.”

Melnyk also said that one of the ways people can help is by supporting different organizations.

She said for humanitarian aid, donate to International Salvation Committee.

To support military efforts, she advised people to check Recovery.

War separates US native from Ukrainian wife Source link War separates US native from Ukrainian wife

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