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US launches initiative to support Ukrainian farmers hit by Russia’s war

The Biden administration is investing $100 million in a new program to provide Ukrainian farmers with essential supplies to sustain future harvests and alleviate global food shortages exacerbated by Russia’s war in the country. Related video: Ukraine’s military uses the United States. Tourists on the battlefield Some farms in Ukraine have turned into battlefields, and farmers who tend to their crops are unable to get machinery and other essential supplies, including fertilizers, seeds and storage containers that usually arrive through ports of the Red Sea due to the continued blockade of Ukrainian ports by Russia. . Ukraine – the fourth largest exporter of corn in the world and the fifth largest exporter of wheat – has also been unable to export its agricultural products due to the Russian occupation. The plan will also include providing funds to farmers who are facing rising prices at the same time. Their income has been very effective. USAID is already working with more than 8,000 Ukrainian farmers to get what they need to strengthen their crops and the new Ukraine Resilience Initiative will expand those efforts.” AGRI-Ukraine will target to Ukraine’s immediate agricultural export challenges, while at the same time supporting the broad needs of Ukraine’s agricultural sector and encouraging the development of Ukraine’s agricultural products through 2023. The initiative will increase the opportunities Ukrainian farmers to essential agricultural inputs including seeds, fertilizers, tools, and pesticides, improving Ukrainian infrastructure capacity and the ability to effectively export agricultural products, improving farmers’ access to finance and expanding business capacity Ukraine for drying and temporary storage, and processing of agricultural products,” said USAID in a statement on Tuesday. USAID will work with banks. Credit unions and to provide Ukraine’s farmers with “funding to continue their operations” given the challenges of rising costs of transportation, labor and other commodities, said a USAID spokesperson. “USAID will work to coordinate the storage of goods properly – working with farmers’ organizations – to get the right solutions to the right places,” said the spokesman, noting that farmers in eastern Ukraine are not they will have the same needs as farmers in the west of the country. “In eastern Ukraine, the cost of transporting farmers may result in some looking to store grain until a safer/cheaper alternative is found. to Poland or Slovakia.” USAID will also work to raise an additional $150 million from donors and the private sector to grow the fund. Efforts to save at least Ukraine’s agricultural sector are “critical to the stability, recovery, and reconstruction of Ukraine.” Russia’s invasion, the World Bank said in April. Ukraine was the largest exporter of wheat and sunflower oil before the war, and this year has been hampered by the fighting. The Secretary-General of the United Nations António Guterres also warned that the ongoing crisis is only going to get worse without efforts to help. “This year’s food problem is not enough.” The next few years could be food shortages.” Engine. Guterres last month. “We need to create stability in the world food and energy markets to break the vicious cycle of rising prices and bring support to developing countries. Ukraine’s food production, food and fertilizer production by Russia must be restored, in the world market – however. War.” Efforts to get Russia to allow the export of Ukrainian grain from the port have been unsuccessful for the past few months. Instead, American and European officials have been working to get the highways from Ukraine up and running. So far, the effort has not led to the export of large amounts of grain, but USAID director Samantha Power said that the effort is making some progress. 2 a month – through a wide range of techniques and strategies,” said Power. This has worsened because of Russia’s occupation of Ukraine, even though they will not condemn the Russian occupation.” The countries that stayed in this war should not eliminate the problem of food shortage in the world,” said Power.

The Biden administration is investing 100 million dollars in a new program to provide farmers in Ukraine with essential products in order to continue to harvest in the future and reduce the problem of food shortage in the world caused by the Russian war in the country.

Related video above: Ukrainian military uses US enemy on battlefield

Some Ukrainian farms have turned into battlefields, and farmers who tend to their crops are unable to get machinery and other essential supplies, including fertilizer, seeds and storage containers that usually arrive through Black Sea ports. , as a result of the ongoing blockade of Ukrainian ports by Russia. Ukraine – the fourth largest exporter of corn in the world, and the fifth largest exporter of wheat – has also been unable to export its agricultural products to foreign countries, as a result of the Russian occupation.

The plan will also include providing funds to farmers who are facing high prices at a time when their incomes are bad.

USAID is already working with more than 8,000 farmers in Ukraine to get what they need to strengthen their crops and the new Ukraine Resilience Initiative will expand those efforts.

“AGRI-Ukraine will target Ukraine’s immediate agricultural export challenges, while at the same time supporting the broader needs of Ukraine’s agricultural sector and encouraging the continued development of Ukraine’s agricultural products through 2023 The policy will increase Ukrainian farmers’ access to essential agricultural inputs, including seeds, fertilizers, tools, and pesticides, improving infrastructure and the ability to effectively export agricultural products. , and increase financing opportunities and expand Ukraine’s business capacity for drying and temporary storage, and processing of agricultural products,” said USAID in a statement released Tuesday.

USAID will work with banks, credit unions and governments to provide Ukrainian farmers with “financial sustainability to continue their operations” given the challenges of rising costs of transportation, labor and other inputs. , said the spokesperson of USAID.

“USAID will work to adjust the warehouse according to the needs of individuals – working with farmers’ groups – to get the right solutions in the right places,” the spokesman said, noting that farmers in the east Ukraine will not have the same needs as farmers in the west. of the country. “In eastern Ukraine, the cost of transporting farmers may result in some looking to store grain until a safer/cheaper alternative is found. to Poland or Slovakia.”

USAID will also work to raise an additional $150 million from donors and the private sector to expand the fund.

The effort to save at least the agricultural sector of Ukraine is “important for stabilization, recovery, and reconstruction of Ukraine,” the spokesman said.

Ukraine’s economy has already fallen into recession as a result of the ongoing war, and the country’s GDP could nearly halve this year as a result of Russia’s invasion, the World Bank said in April. Ukraine was the largest exporter of wheat and sunflower oil before the war, and this year has been hampered by the fighting. The Secretary General of the United Nations António Guterres also warned that the ongoing crisis is only going to get worse without efforts to help.

“This year’s food problem is lack of access. The years to come may be food insecurity,” Guterres said last month. “We need to create stability in the world food and energy markets to break the vicious cycle of rising prices and help developing countries. Ukraine’s food production, food and fertilizer production by Russia must be restored, in the world market – however. war.”

Efforts to get Russia to allow the export of Ukrainian grain from the port have failed in the past few months. Instead, American and European officials have been working to get the highways from Ukraine up and running. So far, the effort has not resulted in the export of grain, but USAID director Samantha Power said that the effort is getting a little success.

“Ukraine and the European Union have been quick to allow the export of at least some of the seized grain and we are working closely with them – about 2 million tons a month – through a patchwork of many methods and techniques.” ” said Power.

Power also called on China to intervene to support the problem of food shortages in the world that has worsened due to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, even if they will not condemn the Russian attack.

“The countries that stayed in this war should not eliminate the problem of food shortage in the world,” said Power.

US launches initiative to support Ukrainian farmers hit by Russia’s war Source link US launches initiative to support Ukrainian farmers hit by Russia’s war

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