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US experts discuss COVID-19 boosters for the fall and beyond

While many Americans are trying to survive after two years of COVID-19 infection, U.S. health officials are debating the best way to use vaccines to continue to be exposed to coronavirus infection. The U.S. Committee of Immunization Specialists met Wednesday to discuss. important questions for the next COVID-19 campaign. Food and Drug Consultants of the Food and Drug Administration will not make a tough decision during the discussion, but their advice could shape the government’s plan for years to come. FDA Prevention Chief Dr. Peter Marks told reporters last week that it would not be a surprise. if the agency authorizes a booster dose in the spring to protect most Americans from new coronavirus mutations. He opened Wednesday’s meeting by warning that declining immunization, new changes and cold weather later this year could pose a risk of further outbreaks. “It’s time for us to intervene,” Marks said. Some of the committee’s key questions: How will the United States decide when to launch the next round? Who should get them? Last week, the FDA approved an additional dose of Pfizer or Moderna for anyone 50 years of age or older and for some young people with weakened immune systems. It is an attempt to get ahead of any possible surgery. Only about half of Americans deserved a third shot and got one. And some independent experts disagree about the need for even more protection for healthy people, due to limited evidence of efficacy or how long it may last. It was the omicron variation that finally attracted the attention of the United States. During this surgery, two doses had an almost 80% effect on the need for air injection or death – and the developer pushed this protection to 94%, federal scientists reported. COVID-19 levels have dropped to low levels in the United States, but health officials are cautious about looking at an omicron cousin who now has the most cases. What is the vaccine update process to address the new differences? All of the COVID-19 vaccines currently in use in the United States are based on the original type of coronavirus released in late 2019. Updating the vaccine will be a complicated task, requiring a compromise between the FDA, the manufacturer and World Health Organization. Annual Update. Influenza vaccines offer one possible product to treat the mutation. The FDA is expected to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of such a system. Twice a year, World Health Organization experts recommend updating the flu vaccine to target emerging species. The FDA then submits those recommendations to its prevention committee, which votes on whether they make sense to the United States, which sets the stage for manufacturers to start shooting their shots and start producing more. like a cold. And immunization manufacturers may need more time to conduct further studies of their COVID-19 injections, which do not have the same safety and efficacy record for the same years as the flu shot.

While many Americans are trying to survive after two years of COVID-19 infection, U.S. health officials are debating the best way to use vaccines to continue to be exposed to coronavirus infection.

A committee of U.S. immunization experts met Wednesday to discuss key questions for the next COVID-19 development campaign. Advisers to the Food and Drug Administration will not make any important decisions during the consultation process, but their recommendations may outline government plans for years to come.

FDA chief vaccinator Dr. Peter Marks told reporters last week that it would not be a surprise if the agency authorizes more calories in the spring to protect more Americans from new coronavirus mutations. He opened Wednesday’s meeting by warning that declining immunity, new variations and cold weather later this year could pose a risk of further escalation.

“All of this combined led us to conclude that a general discussion of COVID-19 prevention is warranted at this time so that we can intervene,” Marks said.

Some important questions for the committee:

How will the United States decide when to launch the next round? Who should get them?

Last week, the FDA approved an additional dose of Pfizer or Moderna for anyone 50 years of age or older and for some young people with weakened immune systems. It is an attempt to get ahead of any possible surgery.

About half of Americans who qualify for the third shot received one. And some independent experts disagree on the need for even more protection for healthy people, due to limited evidence of benefit or how long it may take.

it was the omicron variant that drove the last American rope. During this surgery, two doses had an almost 80% effect on the need for air injection or death – and the developer pushed this protection to 94%, federal scientists reported. COVID-19 levels have dropped to lower levels in the United States, but health officials are keeping a close eye on fellow omicrons who now have the most cases.

What is the process for updating vaccines to address new differences?

All COVID-19 vaccines currently in use in the United States are based on the original version of coronavirus released in late 2019. Updating the vaccine will be a complex task, requiring coordination between the FDA, industry and health authorities. global.

The annual flu vaccine update offers one possible product to combat mutations. The FDA is expected to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of such a system.

Twice a year, World Health Organization experts recommend updating the flu vaccine to reach outbreaks. The FDA then submits those recommendations to its prevention committee, which votes on whether they make sense to the United States, which sets the stage for manufacturers to change firms and start producing people.

But COVID-19 has yet to fall into the category of flu-like flu. And immunization manufacturers may need more time to conduct further studies of their COVID-19 injections, which do not have the same safety and efficacy record for the same years as the flu shot.

US experts discuss COVID-19 boosters for the fall and beyond Source link US experts discuss COVID-19 boosters for the fall and beyond

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