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Ultramarathoner with autism inspiring others after crushing 100 mile goal

Video above: How to prepare suitcases for a marathon With an injured hip, blisters on his legs and experiencing the kind of exhaustion that few would have known, Zach Bates maintained a steely focus and determination. Fighting the pain after running for 28 hours and amidst the sound of tired feet struggling through the dirt of Arizona – finally soft, relaxing music developed on the horizon. The images and sounds of the family, the coaches and the supporters cheering, approached even louder with each step. The finish line, once 100 miles away, was right in front of him. A small, roaring human victory tunnel welcomed Bates as he ran across the finish line and established himself as a marathon runner. “I saw the finish line and people made a tunnel with their hands to cross it. I also saw my cousins “It’s just really exciting,” Bates told CNN, reflecting on his achievement. He was diagnosed with autism at the age of four, the 20-year-old American completed the 100-mile Coldwater Rumble Ultramarathon earlier this year, and became the youngest finisher in the history of the race, at the age of 19. Completing the 20-mile loop five times on steep terrain is an achievement in itself, but Bates finished 38th out of 99 starters in just over 28 hours – and it is worth noting that 33 runners did not finish. The achievement makes Bates look like an experienced super-racer, but he and his family are just beginning their journey into the world of the marathon. “It looked different.” Bates was a member of the high school cross-country team, but after graduating in May 2021, he surprised his family with a new goal. mile race before my 20th birthday “, which was about eight months from that date. “And I was like, oh, that’s a lot,” his mother, Rana, told CNN World Sport’s Patrick Snell. On his decision to run 100 miles, Bates says: “I’ve seen people travel and then I thought they were great. and interesting, and it looked different from other races. I wanted to try to do that. “Neither he nor his parents had any previous experience preparing for the project, but his father, Brian, found ways to help, making it a real family affair.” We are looking for paths for him to do. “We will go ahead as a family and hike on a trail to make sure it is safe,” says Rana. In addition to finding trails, they read books together, organize their entire diet, and make sure their son has the right equipment – such as the watch he wears on long distances, so they can watch it and make sure it is safe. course. Rana and Brian even helped with their training programs before finding more experienced marathon runners – such as mentor John Hendrix and coach Nickademus de la Rosa. With the know-how of Hendrix and De la Rosa, the young American trained to compete in the shorter distances and successfully climbed the 100 miles in a short time. Staying focused instead of being autistic is a reason to make the goal unattainable, his mom explained how it could help him stay focused. they love and want to do, it goes far beyond what I might be able to achieve. for their lives. ” “If we listen to our children and let them do what they want them to do and support them, they will be amazed at where they will end up.” For Bates, he achieved goals and distances that were once just dreams. “He turned to social media to help record his journey. That way, he was embraced by runners around the world, but Rana says he’re not the only way social media has helped.” It helped Zach realize that what he does is special and that what he does inspires people, and that helps Zack want to keep on social media because he thinks it’s worth doing something uncomfortable for himself. “Social media is a bit awkward for him if he is going to help someone else do something difficult and achieve their dreams.” I was very excited and he gave me the courage to take some initial steps, “adds Rana. to have him in our family is just a light and I am inspired by the light that is for everyone around him. ” “He has already scheduled many distance races this year, but when asked about his next big ambition, Bates is looking to higher goals.” I’ve seen the Cocodona 250. It’s like a 250 mile race I had in mind before. It may take some time for me to try to do this fight. Not only is it 250 miles, but it also has an altitude of 50,000 feet! ”With the support of Rana, Brian and the rest of the family, nothing seems impossible when it comes to Zach Bates. takes.

Video above: How to pack your bags for a marathon

With an injured hip, blisters on his legs and experiencing the kind of exhaustion that few would have known, Zach Bates maintained a steely focus and determination.

Fighting pain after 28 hours of running and the sound of tired feet struggling through the dirt of Arizona – finally soft, relaxing music developed on the horizon.

The images and sounds of the family, coaches and supporters cheering became louder with each step. The finish line, once 100 miles away, was right in front of him.

A small, roaring tunnel of human victory welcomed Bates as he ran across the finish line and established himself as a marathon runner.

“I saw the finish line and people made a tunnel with their hands to cross it. I also saw my cousins ​​with their marks. Just really exciting,” Bates told CNN, reflecting on his achievement.

Diagnosed with autism at the age of four, the 20-year-old American completed the Coldwater Rumble 100 marathon earlier this year, and became the youngest finish in race history at the age of 19.

Completing the 20-mile loop five times on steep terrain is an achievement in itself, but Bates finished 38th out of 99 beginners in just over 28 hours – and it is worth noting that 33 runners did not finish.

The achievement makes Bates look like an experienced super-racer, but he and his family are just beginning their journey into the world of the marathon.

“It looked different”

Bates was a member of the high school cross-country team, but after graduating in May 2021, he surprised his family with a new goal.

“Graduation night, he comes up to us and says, ‘Hi, I want to run a 100-mile race before my 20th birthday,’ which was about eight months from that date,” Rana’s mother told Patrick Snell of CNN World Sport. .

On his decision to run 100 miles, Bates says: “I’ve seen people travel and then I thought it was really cool and interesting, and it looked different from other races. I wanted to try to do it.”

Neither he nor his parents had any previous experience preparing for the project, but his father, Brian, found ways to help, making it a truly family affair.

“We are looking for trails to do. We will go earlier as a family and walk a trail to make sure it is safe,” says Rana.

In addition to finding trails, they read books together, organize their entire diet and make sure their son has the right equipment – such as the watch he wears on long distances, so they can watch it and make sure it is safe in course.

Rana and Brian even helped with their training programs before finding more experienced marathon runners – such as mentor John Hendrix and coach Nickademus de la Rosa.

With the know-how of Hendrix and De la Rosa, the young American trained to compete in the shorter distances and successfully climbed the 100 miles in a short time.

Staying focused

Instead of giving his autism a reason to make the goal unattainable, his mom explained how it could help him stay focused.

“In autism, there is this over-focus and when they have that focus on something they love and want to do, it goes far beyond what I can possibly achieve,” he explains.

“It is very important that they are treated as individuals. To be able to look at them and hear what their dreams are, what their hopes are for their lives.

“If we listen to our children and let them do what they want and support them, you will be very surprised where they end up.”

For Bates, he has achieved goals and distances that were once just dreams. As he continues to train for more challenges, he turned to social media to help record his journey along the way. In this way, he has been embraced by runners around the world, but Rana says he is not the only way social media has helped.

“It helped Jacques realize that what he does is unique and that what he does inspires people and that is what helps Jacques want to keep on social media because he feels it’s worth doing.” uncomfortable for himself, something that social media is a bit uncomfortable for him, if he is going to help someone else do something difficult and achieve his dreams “.

“I have had dreams all my life, things I wanted to do. This trip gave me the courage to go ahead and do some of the things I was really excited about and it gave me the courage to take some initial steps,” he added. Rana.

“Having him in our family is just a light and I am inspired by the light that is for everyone around him.”

He has already scheduled many races at various distances this year, but when asked about his next big ambition, Bates is aiming for higher goals.

“I’ve seen the Cocodona 250. It’s like a 250 mile race I’ve been thinking about before. It may take me a while to try this race. Not only is it 250 miles, but it also has [close to] 50,000 feet altitude! “

With the support of Rana, Brian and the rest of the family, he feels that nothing is impossible when it comes to Zach Bates. Wherever the next path in life takes him.

Ultramarathoner with autism inspiring others after crushing 100 mile goal Source link Ultramarathoner with autism inspiring others after crushing 100 mile goal

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