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Two geomagnetic storms to hit Earth on March 14 and 15, NOAA warns

A series of mild geomagnetic storms could hit the earth on Monday and Tuesday (March 14 and 15), according to US and UK government weather agencies, after a moderate solar flare erupted from the sun’s atmosphere a few days ago

The storms shouldn’t do any damage Earthapart from possibly confusing radio transmissions and affecting the stability of the power grid at high latitudes – however, the Northern lights could be seen at lower latitudes than usual, possibly as far north as New York and Idaho in the US, the US said National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

NOAA assigned the incoming storms a G2 category on Monday and a G1 category on Tuesday, based on the agency’s five-point solar storm scale (G5 being the most extreme). According to NOAA, Earth experiences more than 2,000 G1 and G2 category solar storms each decade and is currently in the midst of a mild solar storm band; the latest G2 storm brushed the ground on Sunday (March 13) and passed early in the morning without major problems.

As a result of the incoming solar storm, the aurora could be visible as far away as New York or Idaho, according to NOAA. (Image credit: NOAA)

Like all geomagnetic storms, Monday and Tuesday’s predicted events stem from a burst of charged particles exiting the Sun’s outermost atmosphere, or corona. These bursts, known as coronal mass ejections (CMEs), occur when magnetic field lines in the Sun’s atmosphere tangle and break, ejecting bursts of plasma and magnetic field into space.

Two geomagnetic storms to hit Earth on March 14 and 15, NOAA warns Source link Two geomagnetic storms to hit Earth on March 14 and 15, NOAA warns

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