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Triathlon at Olympics forced to restart when boat gets in way

Let’s try again, triathlon. The Olympic men’s triathlon needed to be redone on Monday. At a strange start, dozens of athletes jumped into the water, other players stayed in the docks, and were helplessly blocked by a boat with an obstructive camera. Fifty-six players marked when the start buzzer sounded, about half of which was underwater before the boat entered, and tried to reverse it out of the way. It took about 13 seconds for the buzzer to sound again to signal a false start. However, not everyone heard it, and some continued to swim and dispatched Olympic support staff to chase after them on their personal watercraft. Some of the first leaders were 200 meters away before they finally stopped swimming and came back. Among the leaders already underwater were the final winner, Norwegian Christian Blumenfeld, British silver medalist Alex Yee, and New Zealand bronze medalist Hayden Wilde. Boats like to pass Float and this start seemed so quick and surprising that I saw a camera boat in front of the midgroup on the left side, “Brummenfeld said. 50 meters I knew this wasn’t right. ” “I didn’t swim for 30 minutes, so I considered it positive. It was a good habit.” Wild was ridiculed and his good start was wiped out. Video below. : Find out more about Olympic surfing. I was dazzled at the start, “he said, and then realized that half of the field wasn’t even underwater … I was pretty angry.” Said. If you take it positively, I’ve been waiting for the start for 25 to 30 minutes. So for me it was great to get 50 meters with full gas and warm my arms a little. The race resumed after about 10 minutes. Not everyone got off to a bad start unharmed. Australia’s Jake Bad Whistle told The Sydney Morning Herald: His nose broke when he was kicked in the face. He still finished in 16th place. “This was one of the roughest swims I’ve ever done,” said Birtwhistle.

Triathlon, let’s try again.

The Olympic men’s triathlon needed to be redone on Monday. At a strange start, dozens of athletes jumped into the water, another player got caught in the dock, and was helplessly blocked by a boat with an obstructive camera.

Fifty-six athletes marked when the start buzzer sounded and tried to reverse it out of the way, with about half being underwater before the boat entered.

It took about 13 seconds for the buzzer to sound again to signal a false start, but not everyone heard it and some continued to swim. Olympic support staff chased on a personal watercraft. Some of the first leaders were 200 meters away before they finally stopped swimming and came back.

Among those already underwater were the final winner, Norwegian Christian Blumenfeld, British silver medalist Alex Yee, and New Zealand bronze medalist Hayden Wilde.

“I saw the boat passing through Float, and I was surprised that I made this start so fast, and I saw a camera boat in front of the midgroup on my left side “Brummenfeld said.

“So when I swam the first 50 meters, I realized this wasn’t right,” he said. “I didn’t swim for 30 minutes, so I saw it as a positive thing. It was good. Practice.”

Wild was accused of having his good start wiped out.

Video below: Olympic surfing details

“When I jumped in, it was full, and I was like,” Oh, I had an absolute blindfold on the start, “and then I realized that half of the field wasn’t even underwater. I was … I’m pretty stiff. “

“But that was actually pretty good. If you take it positively, I’ve been waiting 25 to 30 minutes for the start, so for me I was able to get 50 meters with full gas and warm my arms a bit. It was good.”

The race resumed after about 10 minutes.

Not everyone got off to a bad start unharmed.

Australia’s Jake Bad Whistle told The Sydney Morning Herald that his nose broke when his face was kicked. He was still able to finish in 16th place.

“It was one of the roughest swims I’ve ever done,” said Birtwhistle.

Triathlon at Olympics forced to restart when boat gets in way Source link Triathlon at Olympics forced to restart when boat gets in way

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