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Trial over police force in George Floyd protests starts

Trial over police force in George Floyd protests starts



In the weeks since George Floored was killed while in custody of Minneapolis police, protests have broken out worldwide, uniting conversations on race, police brutality and stomach injustice. In the US, thes conversations air everywhere in our news, our communities, our homes. Which leads to the question. How do we discuss race with our kids? It’s not easy to look a what is happening on our street. Old door is a refugee from Sudan. He explains that racism is a daily reality that he’s still trying to navigate with his kids. They know people are protesting, and they know the reason why Conversations like the doors for many black, indigenous and families of color are not new. Why am I still Why are we still having those conversations since the beginning? Since we were brought here, we’ve had to teach our Children how to be safe, and it’s so, so exhausting. Enrico. So is a mother living in Cincinnati. She took our kids to some protests taking place in her neighborhood. They don’t know what could happen there. Like always, they could find any reason to arrest your arm. Years older son asked to come down, and usually he takes the back seat and nothing’s gonna happen to me. But this time he was really affected by it, and because of that, I had to bring him down. In Massachusetts, Angelica and Marcus Crosby are having similar conversations with their young family in the process of choosing a good school system. We, unfortunately, really had to choose white communities, so we had to have the conversation within ourselves. Okay, we’re doing it. We’re going to choose a white community. What does that mean for our Children? And then kindergarten rolled around and it was walking into orientation and realizing my child is the Onley black child in the room or person of color, period. And I cried, but I knew it had to be done. And for Cameron sake, he has to learn to speak a certain way to dress a certain way to commit a certain type of culture in order to be successful, successful in the United States, in Massachusetts, right, he has to adapt. He has to assimilate. While these conversations are not new for many black, indigenous and families of color, white parents are learning the importance of discussing race with their kids at a young age, Rebecca Latham recently fostered her first big conversation about race with her eight and nine year old kids. Mothers of color have to have really uncomfortable conversations with their Children every single day about staying alive, and my kids are never gonna have to hear that from me. But that doesn’t mean that they shouldn’t here from me how important it is that they take a stand in Vermont. The Lefrancois family is also learning how to promote educational conversations about race. They were wondering, You know what the signs mean is a sensitive subject, but it’s not something that we want toe shy away from. Ask questions. We just try to be honest with that. I’m glad they are asking questions, and I’m proud that they’re asking the questions because it’s an opportunity for them to learn about racism, about protesting and what it means. What all of these families emphasize is that these conversations really started home. Black families have to have this conversation. They have it because it is what keeps their Children safe and what keeps their Children alive. But the problem for many, many families right now is that they didn’t warn this. The first time around because our schools don’t teach about race. You have to say something to your kids. You have to tell them what is happening. Don’t assume that they that they don’t know where that they don’t. Here is one thing that I learned was that by not talking to my Children about this, about racism. They were getting the signal that because it wasn’t happened to them, that it didn’t matter. Starting conversations is one thing, but we want to explore how parents can ensure diversity and racial equity become a priority at home. It starts with understanding where racial bias stems from its understanding that again, for 400 years, black people have undergone inherent oppression. The way that we stop this malicious and disgusting cycle is having open, transparent, raw conversations with our kids. You have to talk about the quality of life that everyone deserves. You can’t. You can’t fix what we don’t talk about and brush under the rug. Once you’ve learned the history, you can begin to answer questions and start positive conversations. Start like you know, how do you feel about the situation? Let’s talk about it in detail. Do you understand what’s going on. If it’s a small child and they’re talking about skin color or something, then talk to them in that frame. If they’re teenagers and they have different feelings about it and they want to talk about political action and that sort of thing, that that’s the frame, I think you want to talk to them. At the end of the day, we know that racism is a learned behavior. Ensuring your child is surrounded by an accurate reflection of our country’s community is important to continue in conversations, getting books about diversity, having books with different colors of individuals, different. You know, people of color in the books that the kids are reading can help them understand. And really, we’re talking about teaching empathy and being able to put ourselves in other people’s shoes, and that’s really important. I think the thing about it that we do know is that really racism has learned it’s not something that kids were born with or that’s in eight. Kids are always curious about differences, so they might go up and ask a question about a person’s hair or about their skin color. I think a frank answer about that could be helpful parents if they hit a hot button and they see themselves speaking where they hear the words coming out of their own child’s mouth. They might realize that the child’s mirroring some of things that they’re saying. And I think at that point it’s a good sort of self check. You have dolls that it showed diverse representation because they really do get the idea that what they see is is what they’re supposed to see. I think early on, if they see a world that’s diverse and they have experiences with Children from different cultural backgrounds, then it’s something we don’t even need. Teoh really worry about. As much as kids are like sponges, they’re so smart and what you see, they see. The sooner you start these conversations, the easier it will be to keep them going. Every night I pray about it should be

The trial for a lawsuit accusing Denver police of using indiscriminate force two years ago against people protesting the killing of George Floyd started Monday in federal court with a lawyer describing officers shooting pepper balls at people filming the protests or standing outside their homes. Timothy Macdonald, one of the lawyers representing 12 people suing Denver, said police targeted peaceful protesters with less-lethal devices like pepper spray, pepper balls, and foam bullets because they did not like their message critical of the police.”To the protest of police violence they responded with brutality,” he said during opening statements in a trial that is believed to be the first for a lawsuit challenging the tactics of police during the protests that erupted across the United States nearly two years ago.However, a lawyer representing Denver, Lindsay Jordan, stressed that police faced “unprecedented violence and destruction” due to agitators in the crowds and said that some of the protesters involved in the lawsuit supported the illegal actions of others.The lawsuit is one of about dozen that have been filed on behalf of over 60 people injured or arrested in Denver’s protests, including several from people who were shot in the eye with less-lethal ammunition amid the demonstrations in the city over several days starting May 28, 2020, according to The Denver Post.The lawsuit in the trial that began Monday seeks unspecified financial damages and asks for a declaration that Denver officials that police violated protesters’ constitutional rights, including their First Amendment right to protest. It also seeks an order for the city to change how officers deals with protesters.In his opening remarks, Macdonald described a protesting dental student who was pepper sprayed in the face without warning while he said he was attempting to de-escalate tensions. He cited the case of a lawyer who was was filming police and protesters was shot in the leg with a pepper ball as she crossed the street near the state Capitol.He also said police fired pepper balls at two women standing outside their home near the protest. That incident happened within an hour of the women and their neighbors cursing at police driving down the street and telling them to get out of their neighborhood.Jordan said the officer who shot the pepper balls at the lawyer crossing the street, Elisabeth Epps, believed she was blocking traffic and was trying to get her out of the street.She urged jurors to consider the totality of the circumstances that police were facing as they examine the evidence in the trial, which includes a voluminous amount of video from police body cameras and surveillance video.Aggressive responses from police to people protesting police brutality nationally have led to financial settlements, the departures of police chiefs and criminal charges.In Austin, Texas, officials have agreed to pay over $13 million to people injured in protests in May 2020 and 19 officers have been indicted for their actions against protesters. Last month, two police officers in Dallas accused of injuring protesters after firing less lethal munitions were charged.However, in 2021, a federal judge dismissed most of the claims filed by activists and civil liberties groups over the forcible removal of protesters by police before then-President Donald Trump walked to a church near the White House for a photo op.

The trial for a lawsuit accusing Denver police of using indiscriminate force two years ago against people protesting the killing of George Floyd started Monday in federal court with a lawyer describing officers shooting pepper balls at people filming the protests or standing outside their homes.

Timothy Macdonald, one of the lawyers representing 12 people suing Denver, said police targeted peaceful protesters with less-lethal devices like pepper spray, pepper balls, and foam bullets because they did not like their message critical of the police.

“To the protest of police violence they responded with brutality,” he said during opening statements in a trial that is believed to be the first for a lawsuit challenging the tactics of police during the protests that erupted across the United States nearly two years ago.

However, a lawyer representing Denver, Lindsay Jordan, stressed that police faced “unprecedented violence and destruction” due to agitators in the crowds and said that some of the protesters involved in the lawsuit supported the illegal actions of others.

The lawsuit is one of about dozen that have been filed on behalf of over 60 people injured or arrested in Denver’s protests, including several from people who were shot in the eye with less-lethal ammunition amid the demonstrations in the city over several days starting May 28, 2020, according to The Denver Post.

The lawsuit in the trial that began Monday seeks unspecified financial damages and asks for a declaration that Denver officials that police violated protesters’ constitutional rights, including their First Amendment right to protest. It also seeks an order for the city to change how officers deals with protesters.

In his opening remarks, Macdonald described a protesting dental student who was pepper sprayed in the face without warning while he said he was attempting to de-escalate tensions. He cited the case of a lawyer who was was filming police and protesters was shot in the leg with a pepper ball as she crossed the street near the state Capitol.

He also said police fired pepper balls at two women standing outside their home near the protest. That incident happened within an hour of the women and their neighbors cursing at police driving down the street and telling them to get out of their neighborhood.

Jordan said the officer who shot the pepper balls at the lawyer crossing the street, Elisabeth Epps, believed she was blocking traffic and was trying to get her out of the street.

She urged jurors to consider the totality of the circumstances that police were facing as they examine the evidence in the trial, which includes a voluminous amount of video from police body cameras and surveillance video.

Aggressive responses from police to people protesting police brutality nationally have led to financial settlements, the departures of police chiefs and criminal charges.

In Austin, Texas, officials have agreed to pay over $13 million to people injured in protests in May 2020 and 19 officers have been indicted for their actions against protesters. Last month, two police officers in Dallas accused of injuring protesters after firing less lethal munitions were charged.

However, in 2021, a federal judge dismissed most of the claims filed by activists and civil liberties groups over the forcible removal of protesters by police before then-President Donald Trump walked to a church near the White House for a photo op.

Trial over police force in George Floyd protests starts Source link Trial over police force in George Floyd protests starts

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