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Timelapse shows construction of NASA’s supersonic aircraft set to fly next year

NASAThe incredible supersonic aircraft, called “Son of Concorde,” is taking shape as it prepares for its first test flight next year.

American space agency Time lapse Video of the construction of the X-59 Quiet Supersonic Technology (QueSST) for crafting at Lockheed Martin Skunk Works in Palmdale. California..

The vessel is designed so that the amazing sonic boom is inaudible on the ground when cruising at Mach 1.4, or 925 mph. For comparison, the speed of sound is 767mph.

A short 43-second clip shows the development of a fuselage that houses the cockpit and a 29.5-foot wide wing that holds part of the fuel and control system.

At the end of the video, the viewer sees the tails together.

This section is made of heat resistant material that protects the aircraft from the heat emitted by the X-59’s GEF414 engine at the top of the aircraft.

This is one of many purposeful design elements that ensure that the aircraft is shaped as desired and produces quiet noise for the people below.

The tail, designed with heat-resistant materials, including the engine compartment, is also nearing completion.

Scroll down to watch the video

NASA’s incredible supersonic aircraft, which travels faster than the speed of sound at 767 mph, is taking shape as it prepares for its first flight next year.

NASA Chief Engineer of the Low Boom Flight Demonstrator (LBFD) project, Jay Brandon, said in a statement:

X-59, first announced 2018Created in collaboration with Lockheed Martin, the move “shows a milestone in bringing supersonic commercial travel one step closer to reality.”

NASA has awarded a US aerospace and defense company a $ 247.5 million contract to build the X-59. It will be discontinued this year and will begin a test flight in 2022.

The team started the venture by creating laser projects for aircraft wings, tails, and fuselage to ensure that their designs fit perfectly.

The U.S. Space Agency shared a time lapse of the construction of the X-59 Quiet Supersonic Technology (QueSST) for an aircraft called the

The U.S. Space Agency shared a time lapse of the construction of the X-59 Quiet Supersonic Technology (QueSST) for an aircraft called the “Son of Concorde” at Lockheed Martin Skunkworks in Palmdale, California.

The short clip shows the development of a fuselage that houses the cockpit and a 29.5-foot wide wing that holds part of the fuel and control system.

The short clip shows the development of a fuselage that houses the cockpit and a 29.5-foot wide wing that holds part of the fuel and control system.

As the project progressed, Lockheed and NASA began putting together their work, which Lockheed Martin’s program director, David Richardson, likened to Lego.

“The heavy use of features and pre-drilled full-size fastener holes has significantly reduced the time it takes to place and install parts, especially such a large one,” Richardson said in a statement. You can combine assemblies. “

“It’s like how LEGO works together. Use a laser tracker to make sure everything is aligned according to engineering specifications before permanently bolting everything. did.

The team celebrated when they confirmed that all the hardware was compatible with the actual technology.

Dave Richwine, Deputy Project Manager for LBFD Technology at NASA, said:

The tail, designed with heat-resistant materials, including the engine compartment, is also nearing completion.

The tail, designed with heat-resistant materials, including the engine compartment, is also nearing completion.

The front of the aircraft, known as the fuselage, helps to form the overall shape of the supersonic aircraft. This area will soon acquire a 30-foot-long nose specially designed to minimize impact-related resistance from aircraft moving faster than the speed of sound.

The front of the aircraft, known as the fuselage, helps to form the overall shape of the supersonic aircraft. This area will soon acquire a 30-foot-long nose specially designed to minimize impact-related resistance from aircraft moving faster than the speed of sound.

The fuselage (the front of the fuselage) helps to form the overall shape of the supersonic aircraft.

This part of the aircraft will soon get a 30-foot-long nose specially designed to minimize impact-related resistance from aircraft moving faster than the speed of sound.

According to NASA, the cockpit looks like an office with state-of-the-art technology that helps pilots fly powerful aircraft.

The cockpit includes the eXternal Vision System (XVS), a forward-facing “window” consisting of two cameras mounted above and below the nose of the X-59.

XVS acts as an additional safety aid to help pilots fly safely in the sky. According to NASA, this is also the only system that fits in the cockpit, with other variations protruding from the canopy.

The video also shows the wings, what NASA says is the most recognizable part of the plane.

Lockheed Martin plans to ship the X-59 to Fort's sister facility later this year.Fort Worth, Texas, where ground tests are conducted to ensure that the aircraft can withstand the loads and stresses normally generated during flight.

Lockheed Martin plans to ship the X-59 to Fort’s sister facility later this year.Fort Worth, Texas, where ground tests are conducted to ensure that the aircraft can withstand the loads and stresses normally generated during flight.

Called the

Called the “Son of Concorde,” the ship is designed so that the amazing sonic boom is inaudible on the ground when cruising at Mach 1.4 (925mph).

Richwine explained that this was “the most complex and first section of the X-59 manufactured by Lockheed Martin.”

“The Rocky de Martin team used robot machines (mongoose and cobra) with names that sounded like pilot callsigns to build the wings before joining them to the tail and fuselage,” NASA shared in a statement. did.

“Mongoose is a tool with the ability to weave composite wing skins that use UV light to bond composite materials. COBRA-Composite operation: Bolt tightening and robotic autodrills-Teams attach wing skins to wing frames Efficiently created holes to enable. “

Lockheed Martin plans to ship the X-59 to Fort’s sister facility later this year. Fort Worth, Texas, where ground tests are conducted to ensure that the aircraft can withstand the loads and stresses normally generated during flight.

The team will also calibrate and test the fuel system, send the X-59 back to California for further testing, and then fly in the first test flight in 2022.

In 2024, NASA will fly the X-59 to several communities across the country to measure people's response to the bangs of aircraft.

In 2024, NASA will fly the X-59 to several communities across the country to measure people’s response to the bangs of aircraft.

If the test flight is successful, NASA will be able to fly the X-59 beyond the test range at the Armstrong Flight Research Center in California in 2023, producing a quieter sound bang on the National Airspace System. We plan to prove that it can be operated safely.

In 2024, NASA will fly the X-59 to several communities across the country to measure people’s response to the bangs of aircraft.

According to NASA, “the data collected will be passed on to the Federal Aviation Administration and the International Civil Aviation Organization for consideration in modifying existing bans on supersonic flight on land.”

Timelapse shows construction of NASA’s supersonic aircraft set to fly next year Source link Timelapse shows construction of NASA’s supersonic aircraft set to fly next year

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