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Texas transgender youth: Texas judge hears case regarding state’s investigations on gender care

Austin, Texas – A Texas judge has heard whether he should have prevented government officials from investigating reports of transgender young people receiving care confirming gender as child abuse.

The hearing came the same day that dozens of major companies – including Apple, Google, Johnson & Johnson, Meta and Microsoft – criticized the Texas directive in a full-page ad on the Dallas Morning News.

“A recent attempt to criminalize a parent for helping their transgender child gain access to medically necessary Texas-based health care runs counter to our corporate values,” read the ad, which used the headline. “DISCRIMINATION IS BAD FOR BUSINESS. “

District Judge Amy Clark Meachum heard Friday from state attorneys and the parents of a 16-year-old girl who was being investigated by the Department of Family and Welfare Services for such care.

Meachum blocked the investigation last week and is considering blocking similar investigations by other families. Parents have sued Republican Governor Greg Abbott for research and instruction by the DFPS to investigate reports of transgender young people receiving care confirming gender as child abuse.

The lawsuit marked the first report of parents being investigated since the Abbott directive and a previous non-binding legal opinion from Republican Attorney General Ken Paxton that described specific treatments that confirmed gender as “child abuse.”

The DFPS said it had launched nine inquiries following Abbott’s directive and Paxton’s opinion.

The American Civil Liberties Union and Lambda Legal sued on behalf of the parents.

The teams also represent a clinical psychologist who said the governor’s directive forces her to choose between reporting clients to the state or losing her license and other sanctions.

ABC13 Courtney Carpenter spoke with the parent of a local transgender child who says the last two weeks have been extremely difficult since the directive was issued.

He did not want to be recognized out of fear of this situation. The parent will be referred to as Jane Doe in this article.

“Our trans child is not the center of our world. We tried not to make it the center of his world. It’s just a footnote. But right now, he’s in front of the center, and that affects her, and “It affects us as a family,” Doe explained.

During the hearing, a CPS employee testified that she resigned over her disagreement with the directive, saying she considered it immoral.

Also Friday, Dr. Megan Mooney, a Houston-based psychologist who works with trans young people, took the position, calling the directive “very annoying” and saying she was concerned about families.

Doe, a seventh generation Texan, is now considering moving to her family.

“I have said it from the beginning. We will fight it. But last week, we started guessing and I could name 10 families moving immediately. As soon as possible,” Doe explained.

Friday’s decision is a welcome relief, but not the end. Doe said, “This will be a pause, as we will not worry that CPS will show up at our door, but we know this is just the beginning.”

The governor’s directive and Paxton’s opinion run counter to the nation’s largest medical groups, including the American Medical Association, which have opposed Republican-backed transgender restrictions on government buildings.

For more news updates, follow Courtney Carpenter at Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

SEE ALSO: ACLU sues Texas over implementation of ‘illegal and dangerous new directives’ for trans children

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Texas transgender youth: Texas judge hears case regarding state’s investigations on gender care Source link Texas transgender youth: Texas judge hears case regarding state’s investigations on gender care

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