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Teens rescue boy with autism struggling in pond

Teens Caron Caldwell and Tristone Santos intended to play basketball on Sunday night when they saw someone struggling for help in a pond in Lincoln, Nebraska. Caldwell said the young child’s head shook in the water and his hands floated in the air. “And his head sank into the water again and didn’t stand up,” Caldwell said. Caldwell jumped in and swam to the child. “He was clinging to me pretty strongly. When I grabbed him, it was a kind of surreal. He definitely couldn’t stand there,” Caldwell said. “He didn’t know where he lived, so he knocked on people’s doors to see if he knew his child,” said 15-year-old Santos. .. She called the police. “The boy stood there, completely soaked and shivering. He brought a towel, wrapped it in a towel, and tried to keep it warm,” Wilson said. When the police arrived, I found the boy’s parents looking for him. .. According to police, the boy had autism and wandered when his family wasn’t watching. Police didn’t quote, but told their parents about Project Life Saver. This is a program that provides a tracking device to help find people who are prone to wandering, such as children with autism. Wilson said he felt relieved on his mother’s face when he reunited with his son. “I’m glad we didn’t experience anything wrong, but it’s good that they were walking on the sidewalk,” Wilson said. I will go to my friend. I noticed the child, “said Santos. “I didn’t really think it was a () hero. It just grabbed a kid. It wasn’t too bad for me,” Caldwell said. They should have passed the pond 15 minutes ago, but were late because they couldn’t find their socks. “It took me forever to find socks and literally saved his life,” Caldwell said.

Teens Caron Caldwell and Tristone Santos intended to play basketball on Sunday night when they saw someone struggling for help in a pond in Lincoln, Nebraska.

“Tristone saw him and said,’I think the kid is drowning,'” said 16-year-old Caldwell.

He said the little child’s head shook in the water and his hands floated in the air.

“And his head sank again into the water, and he didn’t stand up,” Caldwell said.

The two rushed to help. Caldwell jumped in and swam to the child.

“He was pretty sticky to me. When I grabbed him, it was a kind of surreal. He definitely couldn’t stand there,” Caldwell said.

Upon arriving at the shore, the teenager said the boy was unable to communicate well.

“He didn’t know where he lived, so we knocked on people’s doors to see if they knew the kids,” said 15-year-old Santos.

One of the neighbors who answered was Abbey Wilson. She called the police.

“The little boy stood there, completely soaked and shivering. He brought a towel, wrapped it in a towel, and tried to keep it warm,” Wilson said.

When the police arrived, they found the boy’s parents looking for him. According to police, the boy had autism and wandered when his family wasn’t watching.

Police did not quote, but to parents Project life saver.. This is a program that provides a tracking device to help find people who are prone to wandering, such as children with autism.

Wilson said he was relieved on his face when he reunited with his son.

“Both hands went to her face and she got off with a little crying after hearing what had happened,” Wilson said.

She acknowledges the quick action of the two teens.

“I’m glad we didn’t experience anything wrong, but it’s good that those two boys were walking on the sidewalk when they did,” Wilson said. It was.

The two teens do not consider themselves heroes.

“Honestly, the credit goes to my friend. I just noticed the kid,” Santos said.

“I didn’t really think it was a () hero. It just grabbed a kid. It wasn’t too bad for me,” Caldwell said.

Caldwell said they might have missed it all.

They would have passed the pond 15 minutes ago, but he was late because he couldn’t find his socks.

“It took me forever to find socks and literally saved his life,” Caldwell said.

Teens rescue boy with autism struggling in pond Source link Teens rescue boy with autism struggling in pond

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