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Some cities are discussing returns to indoor masking

It’s too early to know whether the highly transmissible ba-5 subvariant will fuel a COVID outbreak here or if the 42 percent increase in cases in Boston earlier this month is just a fluke. 14 21:35 MOS Wearing a mask just in case Some are taking extra precautions as cases rise across the country. In Boston, public health officials say about 22 people a day go to the hospital because of COVID which is about 25 percent. 2:53 Gergen for people who are infected or have received vaccines, mild to moderate illness, so we’re not seeing an increase in ICU admissions. . 1:56 Gergen If nothing else, this is a big wake-up call for people who haven’t gotten their booster that it’s really time. Cities like Boston are encouraging people to wear masks in crowded indoor public spaces as doctors encourage caution rather than alarm. 8:20 Doron don’t confuse the need to always be prepared for the worst with the worst.

Some cities are discussing a return to indoor coverage. Here’s what you need to know


It’s a confusing time, once again, in the COVID-19 pandemic. Cases of COVID-19 are on the rise in the US, due to the most contagious variant of the coronavirus to date. Re-infections are also increased and may increase the chance of new health problems. Even President Joe Biden has contracted the virus, forcing him to work in isolation from the White House. Each of these developments is troubling in its own way. But none of them seem to have shaken the public consciousness the way previous pandemic news could. In CNN’s latest national poll, COVID-19 was a central concern for only 26% of voters, far behind the economy, abortion and the climate crisis. There’s good reason for that: A significant percentage of Americans are vaccinated — though the percentage who have received the booster is lower — and there are new treatments that offer better outcomes for those who catch the virus. Although Biden’s age puts him at risk for severe COVID-19, for example, because of these advances, his experience with the coronavirus should be very different from that of President Donald Trump, who was in the hospital for days in October 2020. with a minor variant that can overcome vaccination or immunity from recent COVID infections, our days of putting COVID-19 on the back burner may be numbered. Take for example Los Angeles, the second most populous city in the U.S. Health officials say Los Angeles County’s high level of community-level COVID-19 means a universal indoor cover-up order could go into effect as soon as this week. While daily reported cases have leveled off, with about 6,700 new cases daily, Department of Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said last week that the community level must drop back to “moderate” by July 28 to avoid a mask requirement indoors on July 29. And it’s not just Los Angeles that is reacting to the increase in the number of cases and hospitalizations. The share of the United States population living in a county with a “high community level of COVID-19,” where the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends universal indoor coverage, has doubled in the past two weeks. And as Americans have turned to faster at-home testing, official case counts reflect only a fraction of the disease’s true burden. That’s why there’s renewed talk about covering indoor spaces, with Boston, for example, issuing a new mask advisory earlier this month. But much depends on local politics, and the merits of such measures—especially mandates—remain up for debate.

It’s a confusing time, once again, in the COVID-19 pandemic.

Cases of COVID-19 are on the rise in the US, due to the most contagious variant of the coronavirus to date. Re-infections are also increased and may increase the chance of new health problems. Even President Joe Biden has contracted the virus, forcing him to work in isolation from the White House.

Each of these developments is troubling in its own way. But none of them seem to have shaken the public consciousness the way previous pandemic news could. In CNN’s latest national poll, COVID-19 was a central concern for just 26% of voters, far behind the economy, abortion and the climate crisis.

There’s good reason for that: A significant percentage of Americans are vaccinated — though the percentage who have received a booster is lower — and there are new treatments that offer better outcomes for those who catch the virus. Although Biden’s age puts him at risk for severe COVID-19, for example, because of these advances, his experience with the coronavirus should be very different from that of President Donald Trump, who was in the hospital for days in October 2020.

But with a secondary variant that can overcome vaccination or immunity from recent COVID infections, our days of putting COVID-19 on the backburner may be numbered.

Take Los Angeles, for example, the second most populous city in the U.S. Health officials say LA County’s high level of community COVID-19 means a universal indoor cover-up order could go into effect as soon as this week. While daily reported cases have leveled off, with about 6,700 new cases daily, Department of Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said last week that the community level must drop back to “moderate” by July 28 to avoid a mask requirement indoors on July 29.

And it’s not just Los Angeles that is reacting to the increase in the number of cases and hospitalizations. The share of the United States population living in a county with a “high community level of COVID-19,” where the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends universal indoor coverage, has doubled in the past two weeks. And as Americans have turned to faster at-home testing, official case counts reflect only a fraction of the disease’s true burden.

That’s why there’s renewed talk about covering indoor spaces, with Boston, for example, issuing a new mask advisory earlier this month. But much depends on local politics, and the merits of such measures—especially mandates—remain up for debate.

Some cities are discussing returns to indoor masking Source link Some cities are discussing returns to indoor masking

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