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Small Alaska town embraces state’s 1st swimmer to win gold

The topic of the Olympics pervaded the coastal area of ​​Alaska, thousands of miles from Japan, almost a day after Lydia Jacoby recorded a major upset at the Tokyo Olympics to bring back money with a woman’s 100-meter chest stroke. He will return to the 17-year-old Jacoby Seward’s third-year high school, qualifying for the first time in Alaska to compete in the Olympic Games for Swimming. “We wanted a medal, but it was far beyond our expectations that she first hit the wall,” volunteered at the Seward Tsunami Swim Club, a small team to which Jacoby belongs. Swim mom Saras Panos said. “And everyone is shining with pride, joy, just tears, and lots of tears.” Nearly 500 fans came to society as they filled Seward’s Alaska Railroad Terminal Building for a watch party late Monday afternoon. Observed the target distance protocol. When Jacoby was declared the winner, the room erupted with cheers, hoops, and horror, with the exception of Spanos. “And at that point, my tears had just begun and I was crying ugly for the next 20 minutes,” she said with pride. Size as the game progresses. Despite being screened around 2:30 am Alaska time, Jacoby’s first race was attended by about 60 people at the beginning of the week. Allon Lefever of Lancaster, PA, took his grandson to Alaska for a special trip and happened to be in an ice cream parlor when Jacoby won the gold medal. He didn’t see or understand why downtown streets were applauding, screaming, and hanging car windows in Seward, a community of about 2,700 people named after the country’s first president. rice field. Then someone at the next table said, “Hey, Lydia just got the money.” Then someone else says, “No, that’s impossible.” “Yeah, yeah, yeah.” After stopping to take a picture of the “lucky” sign along the road, Refever said. Many companies support Jacoby by placing signs on windows, marquees, or Tammy Nicholas. ‘Case, on her T-shirt. It was adorned with the slogan “Go Lydia Go” and featured an Alaska Native fish design with the phrase “Too Fast to Freeze”. “I’m very proud of her,” said Nicholas, office manager for a gravel pit and concrete supplier. Peterson has just graduated from Seward High School and is a year ahead of Jacoby. They appeared in the play “You are a good man, Charlie Brown” a few years ago. “Just before the COVID hit, we were all in school and going to the Olympic trials was a challenge. The whole school was watching on this little little TV, and everyone was hooked,” he said. Told. At that time and now she participated in the Olympics and won a gold medal. For example, it’s insane. It’s hard for everyone to figure out here, “he said. Solomon Damiko, one of the swim club coaches. “She really made sure she was making the most of that extra year,” he said. “Damiko and other coaches also attended the watch party, and said he wasn’t nervous. I did. Omaha, Nebraska. Instead, he was excited and hopeful. “I knew that her way of thinking was really good, her physical training was really good, and the environment at Team USA was really great,” he said. “I can’t say I’m expecting a gold medal, but I was hoping she would shock the world,” Damiko said. Especially because she was flying under the radar of many media. A person with good work ethic and a sweet temperament. “What happened last night couldn’t happen to a better kid,” he said.

The topic of the Olympics pervaded the coastal areas of Alaska, thousands of miles from Japan, almost a day after Lydia Jacoby recorded a major upset at the Tokyo Olympics to bring back money in a women’s 100-meter breaststroke.

Returning to Seward’s third year of high school, 17-year-old Jacoby participated in Alaska’s first swimming Olympics.

“We wanted a medal, but it was far beyond our expectations that she first hit the wall,” volunteered at the Seward Tsunami Swim Club, a small team to which Jacoby belongs. Swim mom Saras Panos, who is doing, said. “And everyone is shining with pride, joy, just tears, and lots of tears.”

Nearly 500 fans observed the social distance protocol when filling Seward’s Alaska Railroad Terminal Building for a watch party late Monday afternoon.

When Jacoby was declared the winner, the room erupted with cheers, hoops, and horror, with the exception of Spanos.

“And at that point, my tears just started, and I just cried ugly for the next 20 minutes,” she said with pride and so much overcoming.

As the tournament progressed, the size of the watch party grew. Despite being screened around 2:30 am Alaska time, Jacoby’s first race was attended by about 60 people at the beginning of the week. It was even bigger in the semi-finals.

Allon Lefever of Lancaster, PA, took his grandson to Alaska for a special trip and happened to be in an ice cream parlor when Jacoby won the gold. He didn’t see or understand why downtown streets were clapping, screaming, and hanging car windows in Seward, a community of about 2,700 people named after the country’s first president. ..

“Then someone at the next table said,’Hey, Lydia just got the money.’ Then someone else says,’No, that’s impossible.’ “Yeah, yeah, yeah.” And the place was raging. It was very cool, “said Refever, after stopping to take a picture of the” lucky “sign placed along the road.

Many companies support Jacoby by putting a sign on her T-shirt for windows, marquees, or Tammy Nicholas. It was adorned with the slogan “Go Lydia Go” and featured an Alaska Native fish design with the phrase “Too Fast to Freeze”.

“She is working hard to compete in the Olympics and we are very proud of her,” said Nicholas, office manager of a gravel pit and concrete supplier.

“It’s amazing that she can push hard and that she has the support of this community to push her,” she said.

Xuchang / Xinhua via Getty Images

Lydia Jacoby of the United States will react after the women’s 100m breaststroke final of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics held at the Tokyo Aquatics Center in Tokyo on July 27, 2021.

Clay Peterson has just graduated from Seward High School and is a year ahead of Jacoby. They appeared in the play “You are a good man, Charlie Brown” a few years ago.

“Just before the COVID hit, we were all in school and going to the Olympic trial was a challenge. The whole school was watching on this little little TV and everyone was hooked,” he said. I did.

“It was just then, and now she went to the Olympics and then won money, for example, it’s … it’s insane. It’s hard for anyone here to figure out,” he says. I did.

Jacoby benefited from the one-year delay in the Olympics due to the COVID-19 pandemic, said Solomon Damiko, one of the swim club coaches.

“In this extra year, you can get stronger and faster all year round and make your technique much faster. She took the ball and ran with it,” he said. “She really made sure to get the most out of that extra year.”

Gold & # x20; Medalist & # x20; Lydia & # x20; Jacoby & # x20; & # x20; United & # x20; State & # x20; Celebrate & # x20; On & # x20; Podium & # x20; After & # x20; Final & # x20; Female & # x27; s & # x20; 100m & # x20; Breaststroke & # x20; At & # x20; 2020 & # x20; Summer & # x20; Olympic, & # x20; Tuesday, & # x20; July & # x20; 27, & # x20; 2021, & # x20; Tokyo, & # x20; Japan.

Matthias Schroeder / AP Photo

US gold medalist Lydia Jacoby will celebrate on the podium after the women’s 100-meter breaststroke final at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo on Tuesday, July 27, 2021.

Damiko and other coaches also attended the watch party, he said, less nervous than being on the pool deck with her during the Olympic trial in Omaha, Nebraska. Instead, he was excited and hopeful.

“I knew that her way of thinking was really good, her physical training was really good, and the environment at Team USA was really great,” he said.

“I can’t say I’m expecting a gold medal, but I was hoping she would shock the world,” Damiko said. Especially because she was flying under the radar of many media.

He called Jacoby a wonderful person with great work ethic and a sweet temperament.

“What happened last night couldn’t happen to a better kid,” he said.

Small Alaska town embraces state’s 1st swimmer to win gold Source link Small Alaska town embraces state’s 1st swimmer to win gold

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