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Sacramento’s first woman elected mayor Anne Rudin dies at 97

According to her family, Anne Rudin, the first woman to be elected mayor of Sacramento, died on Thanksgiving for complications from pneumonia. She was 97 years old. Rudin was president of both the Women’s Voter’s Federation in Sacramento and the Women’s Voter’s Federation in California. She has been a member of the Sacramento City Council for 12 years. She was subsequently elected Mayor of Sacramento and served the city from 1983 to 1992. The Federation of Female Voters has a scholarship in her name. The Anne Rudin Peace Pond in the Land Park area was also named after her. “I didn’t hesitate to tackle the controversial issue,” Rudin said in a message his son Jay Rudin provided to KCRA 3 for posthumous publication. She gave some examples in her self-analysis of the results. Read Anne Rudin’s autobiographical note here In a message, Rudin thought that the city should focus on the needs of the old regions of the city, so in favor of becoming an Alcoarina, the North Natomas region. He emphasized that he voted against the rezoning of. She also said she believed that with proper planning, the closure of the military base “did not have to be disastrous for Sacramento.” “In 1984, I made a fuss when I asked for an appointment with the Director of the Department of Defense’s Office of Local Defense Community Cooperation on a trip from the Parliament to the Parliament of the annual Chamber of Commerce.” Rudin writes. “I wanted to know what kind of support a city or county could receive if a military base was closed.” When the McClellan and Mather Air Force Bases and the Sacramento Army Base were closed “Military to domestic use The transition to wasn’t simple. It wasn’t easy, but it was successful, “Rudin wrote. She also emphasized that she is working on a local ordinance banning the sale and possession of offensive weapons in Sacramento. To help Mayor Stockton, who was seeking a ban after a deadly shooting at Cleveland Elementary School in 1989. “This is useless, but a deliberate gesture, probably a bit naive, but I wanted to show that the gun control position wouldn’t lose the election. Unfortunately, other cities are our example. I didn’t obey, “Rudin also talked about his achievements. “Progressive” changes in homosexual rights over 20 years. It began with going to see the police chief shortly after being first elected to the city council in 1971. He liked to wear women’s clothing, “she wrote. “It lasted until the end of the second mayor’s term in 1992, when the Cohabitation Ordinance was successfully enacted.” Rudin also defended women’s rights by helping female employees organize women’s caus. wrote. “Especially in non-traditional jobs that have been harassed by male employees,” she continued, helping workers in private workplaces raise children in the field. Regarding election funds, Rudin wrote that he had enacted several ordinances that were overturned by a court decision. She wrote that those efforts were a “desperate cause.” Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg called Rudin “decent” and “tough” in a statement on Saturday. “Mayor Anne Rudin has always been a leader ahead of the times,” Steinberg said. “She first realized that LGBTQ rights were core civil rights. She quickly realized the potential to turn a military base into an economic opportunity. She broke the glass ceiling. She became the first female mayor to be elected in Sacramento. She was decent, tough and always promoted. Sacramento’s highest values. ”Rudin is Philip Note and Angelina Makuri. Born as the eldest son of a child. Her father, an immigrant from Sicily, fought the US military in France in World War I. Her mother, who also has Sicilian roots, grew up in New Jersey. Rudin met his husband, Dr. Edward Rudin, when he was a medical student at Temple University. Ann Rudin earned a bachelor’s degree in education from Temple University and attended Temple University Hospital Nursing School before becoming a registered nurse, where she worked as a nursing educator. She also earned a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Southern California, worked at the Zion Mountain Hospital Nursing School in San Francisco, and then professionally “rested” while raising four children at Riverside and Sacramento. While in the Sacramento City Council, Rudin considered in the highlights his opposition to development along the banks of the Sacramento River, proposing that Sacramento County be responsible for dispatching and funding emergency ambulance services, Sacramento. Introduced the first smoking ordinance, but as her “most important achievement”, Rudin wrote that she considered the heritage of her family. She and her husband said, “We raised four children who had a social conscience and planted them in their children. All four were as self-sufficient as the children and of value to the community. Engaged in valuable efforts and careers. Where they live. They helped me, each other, and the community with their spouse. ”

According to her family, Anne Rudin, the first woman to be elected mayor of Sacramento, died on Thanksgiving for complications from pneumonia. She was 97 years old.

Rudin was president of both the Women’s Voter’s Federation in Sacramento and the Women’s Voter’s Federation in California.

She has been a member of the Sacramento City Council for 12 years. She was subsequently elected Mayor of Sacramento and served the city from 1983 to 1992.

NS The Federation of Female Voters has a scholarship in her name.. The Anne Rudin Peace Pond in the Land Park area was also named after her.

“I didn’t hesitate to tackle the controversial issue,” Rudin said in a message his son Jay Rudin provided to KCRA 3 for posthumous publication. She gave some examples in her self-analysis of the results.

In the message, Rudin emphasized that he voted against the rezoning of the North Natomas region in support of becoming an al-coalina because he thought the city should focus on the needs of the city’s old regions. bottom. She also said she believed that with proper planning, the closure of the military base “did not have to be disastrous for Sacramento.”

“In 1984, I made a fuss when I asked for an appointment with the Director of the Department of Defense’s Office of Local Defense Community Cooperation on a trip from the Parliament to the Parliament of the annual Chamber of Commerce.” Rudin writes. “I wanted to know what kind of support cities and counties could use if a military base was closed.”

“The transition from military to home was neither simple nor easy, but it was successful,” Rudin wrote when the McClellan and Mather Air Force Bases and the Sacramento Army Base were closed.

She also emphasized that she was working on a local ordinance banning the sale and possession of assault weapons in Sacramento, but was eventually superseded by a state ban.

Rudin felt that he had a “moral obligation” to support Mayor Stockton, who had sought a ban after being shot deadly at Cleveland Elementary School in 1989.

“Banning guns in one city wouldn’t help if it was readily available in a neighboring city,” she wrote. “This is useless, but a deliberate gesture, probably a bit naive, but I wanted to show that the gun control position wouldn’t lose the election. Unfortunately, other cities are our example. I didn’t obey. “

Rudin also talked about achieving “gradual” changes in gay rights for over 20 years.

“I started by going to see the police chief on behalf of a member who felt discriminated against because he liked to wear women’s clothes shortly after I was first elected to the city council in 1971. “She wrote. “It continued until the end of my second mayoral term in 1992, when I succeeded in enacting a cohabitation ordinance.”

Rudin also embraced women’s rights by helping female employees organize female caucuses “to assist women, especially in non-traditional jobs that were harassed by male employees.” I wrote that I defended it.

She said she continued to support on-site childcare for workers in private workplaces.

Regarding election funds, Rudin wrote that he had enacted several ordinances that were overturned by a court decision. She wrote that those efforts were a “desperate cause.”

Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg called Rudin “decent” and “tough” in a statement on Saturday.

“Mayor Anne Rudin has always been a leader ahead of her time,” Steinberg said. “She first realized that LGBTQ rights were core civil rights. She quickly realized the potential to turn a military base into an economic opportunity. She broke the glass ceiling. Became the first female mayor to be elected in Sacramento. She was decent, tough and always promoted. Sacramento’s highest values. “

Rudin was born as the eldest of three children, Philip Note and Angelina Makuri. Her father, an immigrant from Sicily, fought the US military in France in World War I. Her mother, who also had Sicilian roots, grew up in New Jersey.

Rudin met his husband, Dr. Edward Rudin, when he was a medical student at Temple University. Ann Rudin earned a bachelor’s degree in education from Temple University and attended Temple University Hospital Nursing School before becoming a registered nurse, where she worked as a nursing educator.

She also earned a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Southern California, worked at the Zion Mountain Hospital Nursing School in San Francisco, and then professionally “rested” while raising four children at Riverside and Sacramento.

While in the Sacramento City Council, Rudin considered in the highlights his opposition to development along the banks of the Sacramento River, with Sacramento County responsible for dispatching and funding emergency ambulance services, and Sacramento’s first smoking. Proposed to introduce the ordinance.

However, Rudin writes that he considers the family heritage to be the “most important achievement.”

She and her husband said, “We raised four children who had a social conscience and planted them in their children. All four were as self-sufficient as the children and of value to the community. Engaged in valuable efforts and careers. Where they live. They helped me, each other, and the community with their spouse. “

Sacramento’s first woman elected mayor Anne Rudin dies at 97 Source link Sacramento’s first woman elected mayor Anne Rudin dies at 97

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