Local

Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps provides jobs for youth

Not all jobs require you to get your hands dirty, and most would agree that the Sacramento Regional Conservation House is a little more useless than others. “Yes, it can be very vulgar,” said 22-year-old Malia McAdams. “Sometimes there are worms in here, moldy food.” McAdams started working at the SRCC a few months ago. The SRCC is the largest education and training program in the city, employing only 18- to 26-year-olds. “Well, this is an age group that is being cut and also this is an age group that sometimes needs to be redirected and receive skills, training and certification to help them get on the path to full employment,” said the executive director. SRCC’s Paula Birdsong. These young people are gaining life skills. “It’s 7 a.m. to 3:30 a.m.,” McAdams added. “Drink or do anything.” For the future because it trains us as young adults for the future, “Turner said.” But it’s a job that pays real money. ” “Turner. Everything else is work.” This includes working with the city to keep the ditches and streets of the city tidy. There are many things you would not do on a daily basis. ” at 6 pm We focus on those who work to make our communities safer and help our young people thrive, especially in neighborhoods facing social and economic inequalities. Is there a direction upwards or downwards? “Saving one life, one cast at a time”: Man was changing life, now uses fishing to keep teens away from violence. crime

Not all jobs require you to get your hands dirty and most would agree that Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps is a little more useless than others.

“Yes, it can be very ugly,” said 22-year-old Malia McAdams. “Sometimes there are worms in here, moldy food.”

McAdams started working at the SRCC a few months ago. The SRCC is the largest education and training program in the city, employing only 18- to 26-year-olds.

“Well, this is an age group that is being cut and also this is an age group that sometimes needs to be redirected and receive skills and training and certification to help them get on the path to full time,” said the Executive Director. of the SRCC, Paula Birdsong.

These young people acquire life skills.

“It’s from 7 to 3:30,” McAdams added. “This is an eight-hour break where they are productive and not just on the streets, smoking or drinking or doing anything.”

KCRA 3 caught McAdams and its crew sorting out the recycling. It’s not bright at all, but it does give them a chance to recycle their lives.

“It helps the community for the future because it educates us as young adults about the future,” Turner said.

But it is a job that pays real money.

“Surely this part of the bodyguard is the dirty work,” Turner said. “It’s not all dirty work. “Everything else is work.”

This includes working with the city to keep the city’s ditches and streets tidy.

“It’s out there a lot more than you think it would be to landscaping and conserving vegetation,” said Emilio Barrera. “We make fires and work with the city. There are many things you would not do on a daily basis. ”


This story was created as part of it Project Community: Saving Our Cities. The series airs on KCRA 3 and on the Internet from Monday to Friday throughout May each night during the News at 6 p.m. We focus on those who work to make our communities safer and help our young people thrive, especially in neighborhoods facing social and economic inequalities.

Here are more stories from the Saving Our Cities series:

Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps provides jobs for youth Source link Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps provides jobs for youth

Related Articles

Back to top button