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Sacramento Mayor Steinberg explains why he didn’t call for event closures downtown after mass shooting

KCRA 3 NEWS. >> THANK YOU. ANDREA: LISA: HAND TODAY WE AOLS SPOKE WITH SACRAMENTO MAYOR DARRELL STEINBERG. >> LET’S GO TOND AREA FLORES WITH MORE ON WHAT HE HAD TO SAY TO HER TODAY. ANDREA: TONIGHT, THE COMMUNITY WILL COME TOGETHER FOR A VIGIL TO REMEMBER THE SIX PEOPLE KILLED, AND 12 OTHERS INJURED. A FEW HOURS AGO. I SPOKE ONE-ON-ONE WITH SACRAMENTO MAYOR, DARRLEL STEINBERG, ABOUT THE RISE IN GUN VIOLENCE. >> IF THOSE WHO ARE OPPOSED TO ABORTION CAN SUE ABORTION PROVIDERS, AS THE SUPREME COURT SAYS, THEY CAN, WHICH I DISAGREE WITH BY THE WAY, STRONGLY, WELL, HEAD AND ALLOW PEOPLE TO SUE THE MANUFACTURERS OF THESE WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION. THIS IS NOT JUST A CITY ISSUE. I MEAN, IT HAPPENED HERE, WE ARE EXPERIENCING THE TRAUMA, WE ALL HAVE TO LOOK INSIDE AND SEE WHAT WE CAN DO BETTER, BUT THIS IS A NATIONAL ISSUE. ANDREA A:LSO DURING OUR ONE-ON-ONE CONVERSATION, THE MAYOR TOLD ME HE IS AGAINST ANY NOTION OF DEFUNDING THE POLICE. AND WANTS TO MAKE SURE THEY VEHA

Sacramento Mayor Steinberg explains why he didn’t call for event closures downtown after mass shooting

“I think we are more than capable of both giving the space and the priority to the victims and at the same time encouraging people to be with one another,” Steinberg said.


Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg sat down Monday for an interview with KCRA 3’s Andrea Flores to talk about his reaction to Sunday’s shooting downtown that killed six adults and wounded 12 others. Steinberg talked about what he said was a need for national action on guns, how the city is supporting victims of the tragedy and whether it was too soon for him to have urged people to return downtown while bodies were still lying in the street nearby. “I think we are more than capable of both giving the space and the priority to the victims and at the same time encouraging people to be with one another,” Steinberg said. He also said he was “against any notion of defunding the police.”This Q&A has been lightly edited. You can watch the full interview in the video below. Q: How does it feel now a day plus later knowing that this happened in your city?Steinberg: “It feels like my city has just experienced a tremendous trauma, which it has. This was a terrible and an unacceptable event. I really emphasize the word unacceptable because we shouldn’t tolerate, not just in our city but in our state and in our country, the proliferation of these weapons that can indiscriminately fire at large numbers of people and injure and kill dozens. We have a real sickness in this country and in this culture. I know it’s not all about guns but I think that must be the primary focus. I put it this way. Why can’t we have a sane conversation in this country and have a line. And on one side of the line we say that we respect private gun ownership for self-defense, for hunting and for sport. And on the other side of the line we will do everything we can to eliminate assault weapons, ghost guns, guns that have only one purpose – and that is to maim and injure dozens of people at a time. We don’t make that distinction in this country. Now in California we have a number of very aggressive laws, the best in the nation. But what does it take for somebody to go to Nevada, to go to another state, go to a gun show without any background check requirement and come back? What does it take for someone to go on the internet and to be able to purchase the component parts of a ghost gun. There’s more we can do, including Gov. Newsom’s idea around if those who are opposed to abortion can sue abortion providers as the Supreme Court says they can, which I disagree with strongly, why can’t we turn that on its head and allow people to sue the manufacturers of these weapons of mass destruction? This is not just a city issue. It happened here. We are experiencing the trauma. We all have to look inside and see what we can do better. But this is a national issue and until we come to grips with curing this sickness around the glorification of violence and the proliferation of multi-fire weapons, this is going to, unfortunately, continue to happen.”Q: Today we learned the names of the six people who were killed. What’s your message to their families today? Steinberg: “This is senseless and my message to the families is that we will do anything and everything we can to envelop you with our support. We have set up, working with the district attorney’s office, working with the governor’s office, support centers at Cal Expo and elsewhere where we are going to do everything we can for the families as we should as we must. They’re the ones suffering the most. And tonight at our vigil at 7:30, we have to hold them close even if they’re not there. But it’s not enough to just give our thoughts and prayers and support and then move on. That’s what happens too often. That’s what happens when these sorts of mass shootings occur throughout the country. Thoughts and prayers are not enough. What is the action we are going to take? In our city, we are already investing significant resources, unprecedented level of resources in young people and in gang intervention. Now, these were adults that were killed and we don’t know who the perpetrators were but it all starts upstream. We got thousands, tens of thousands of guns off the street last year and we can never prove what tragedies were averted as a result of those efforts. But we need to double or triple those efforts and put the resources behind getting more of these guns off the street. And so it is a time to support the victims and their families and anyone who witnessed this. But it’s also our opportunity to continue to take stock of what we can all do better to do everything in our power to try to avert the next tragedy.”Q: We heard yesterday during one of the press conferences you encouraged people to continue to come to downtown. The bodies of the victims were still at the scene. Do you think that was a little bit too soon to send that message?Steinberg: “I was asked the question and so I responded. I was referring to the days and the weeks and the months ahead. And I think it is very important, obviously that we put the victims first, but we also recognize that there are also a lot of hard-working men and women who have opened small businesses downtown. There are a lot of people who work downtown and I think it is important for the mayor to speak to the wide audiences here and to all of the issues that we are feeling in the moment. I don’t think it was too soon because it wasn’t isolated. I answered the question, ‘do I think people should go downtown?’ And my answer is yes. There are two responses to tragedy, which by the way could have occurred everywhere, and occurred at 2 o’clock in the morning. We can cower and we can say that we are going to isolate ourselves from one another or we can recognize that this downtown is a growing and beautiful place with a lot of challenges. Look at this week, we had three major concerts. You had Wicked. You have restaurants that have long waiting lists, reservations for people to get in. People need to be among each other. People need to be out. We’ve had enough with COVID and people being isolated. So it is not in any way inconsistent with our first responsibility and that is to care for the people who are suffering, the victims. And to continue to elevate the precautions that we’re already taking. Additional security. Additional lighting. Additional security cameras to assure and reassure people that downtown is safe and to say, live your lives because we need to be with each other.Q: Yesterday, as the crime scene was still being processed we had a Kings game, we had things going on in the city. We had folks walking down the sidewalk on the same street as the families that are still mourning these victims whose bodies are still on the street. Do you think the city should have taken the approach to cancel all major events? Or do you think that was the right thing to do?Steinberg: “First, a couple of things. I want to really thank our first responders. Our police and our fire departments. The heroic work that they did in the most difficult of circumstances, including really trying to save lives of victims. Do I think the city should have canceled all events? No, I don’t. Because I think we are capable of mourning the victims. I think we are capable of supporting their families and at the same time making sure that people can be connected with one another in positive ways. That’s really what downtown and a civic center is all about. People need to be connected. I think we are more than capable of both giving the space and the priority to the victims and at the same time encouraging people to be with one another.”Q: Some people may be frankly scared to come downtown at this point. What’s your message to them? What is the city doing? Saturday night’s going to come pretty soon here. Steinberg: “We have recently over the last several months invested over $8 million in what we call clean and safe Sacramento. That’s the money that’s being invested in additional security cameras, in lighting on J, K, and L streets. On additional security. A separate pot of money to do the same things in Old Sacramento. And so we are enhancing security. I would urge people to take precautions. To be aware of your circumstances. That’s the prudent thing to do. And I would say, and it’s just my opinion, get home early. I don’t know that people need to be out late, late hours. Maybe that’s just my age speaking. Get home at a decent hour. But come down, be aware of your circumstances. We’re taking extra precautions. Have a good time and live your life.”Q: Is this going to be San Francisco? LA, where we’ve seen a recent uptick in crime? Should people be worried about that happening in this city?Steinberg: “Crime is up all over the country. It was two-plus years ago right before COVID where the city went two years without a single youth homicide. This was not a youth homicide but those numbers are changing and there is an uptick in crime and in violent crime. It’s not unique to Sacramento. Yes, people should be concerned. We’re all concerned. The question is what do we do about it? I’m against any notion of defunding the police. I think the police play a very, very important role in protecting our community but they can’t do it alone. It has to be a real partnership with those who provide the youth services, with the community-based ambassadors who know what’s really going on, who can intervene if there’s a fight to make sure that it does not escalate into something more violent. So it’s all about a partnership. The city must invest in its public safety resources, including its police and fire. But public safety includes investing in young people, investing in our community. Building up the hope in these communities and not just in downtown but all of neighborhoods of Sacramento. I like to think that in my five years we have begun to change the arc of what we consider to be a core priority of our city. The city used to be just a service provider and that’s still our most important function. But now we are directly investing in communities, directly investing in youth and violence prevention and gang intervention and economic development and attracting new industry and the creative economy and affordable housing. And so that’s the modern role of a city and our city and it’s the combination of all those strategies that will help Sacramento get through this. I’m not a Pollyanna about any of it. I know what’s happening. I know that people are afraid. But I also see unprecedented amount of construction and building in our downtown, people moving downtown. I see all the new restaurants, the food scene, the new theater, the convention center, the Golden 1 Center, top-notch concerts and sporting events. And so we just have to be smart. We need to lead. We need to enhance all that we have started to do to provide people the assurance that they’re going to be safe and recognizing that there are never guarantees in life, that sometimes these terrible things happen and it’s our job to do everything we can to prevent it from ever happening again without guaranteeing that in any city in California and in the United States, especially back to the proliferation of these awful weapons – that these kinds of things will happen. We need help. We need help from the federal government. We’re getting a lot of help from the state government. The president has been very vocal on gun violence as has the governor. But we have to choose to live, to move forward and to do everything we can to keep people safe but also to promote the great quality of life in our city.”Q: We ended our newscast last night the unity that we have seen so far. And Sacramento strong has been something we have seen. What makes Sacramento strong? Steinberg: “This is a terrible crisis but it’s not our first crisis. You think about what we have been through over the past couple of years. I remember back when I was a new public official. Sacramento was hit by a number of hate crimes from white supremacists. Here’s the thing about Sacramento. We always step up. This is an inclusive community. It is an engaged community. It is a community that cares for one another. When one suffers, the others who weren’t the direct victims stand up. And then when it happens to the next group, the people who were victimized stand up for them. That’s the beauty of this community and it never ever changes. And so together we are going to envelop the victims of this family. That’s number one. We’re going to take our pain, we’re going to take our trauma, we’re going to learn our lessons and then we’re going to continue to be and to continue to become a great city.”

Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg sat down Monday for an interview with KCRA 3’s Andrea Flores to talk about his reaction to Sunday’s shooting downtown that killed six adults and wounded 12 others.

Steinberg talked about what he said was a need for national action on guns, how the city is supporting victims of the tragedy and whether it was too soon for him to have urged people to return downtown while bodies were still lying in the street nearby.

“I think we are more than capable of both giving the space and the priority to the victims and at the same time encouraging people to be with one another,” Steinberg said.

He also said he was “against any notion of defunding the police.”

This Q&A has been lightly edited. You can watch the full interview in the video below.

Q: How does it feel now a day plus later knowing that this happened in your city?

Steinberg: “It feels like my city has just experienced a tremendous trauma, which it has. This was a terrible and an unacceptable event. I really emphasize the word unacceptable because we shouldn’t tolerate, not just in our city but in our state and in our country, the proliferation of these weapons that can indiscriminately fire at large numbers of people and injure and kill dozens. We have a real sickness in this country and in this culture. I know it’s not all about guns but I think that must be the primary focus. I put it this way. Why can’t we have a sane conversation in this country and have a line. And on one side of the line we say that we respect private gun ownership for self-defense, for hunting and for sport. And on the other side of the line we will do everything we can to eliminate assault weapons, ghost guns, guns that have only one purpose – and that is to maim and injure dozens of people at a time. We don’t make that distinction in this country. Now in California we have a number of very aggressive laws, the best in the nation. But what does it take for somebody to go to Nevada, to go to another state, go to a gun show without any background check requirement and come back? What does it take for someone to go on the internet and to be able to purchase the component parts of a ghost gun. There’s more we can do, including Gov. Newsom’s idea around if those who are opposed to abortion can sue abortion providers as the Supreme Court says they can, which I disagree with strongly, why can’t we turn that on its head and allow people to sue the manufacturers of these weapons of mass destruction? This is not just a city issue. It happened here. We are experiencing the trauma. We all have to look inside and see what we can do better. But this is a national issue and until we come to grips with curing this sickness around the glorification of violence and the proliferation of multi-fire weapons, this is going to, unfortunately, continue to happen.”

Q: Today we learned the names of the six people who were killed. What’s your message to their families today?

Steinberg: “This is senseless and my message to the families is that we will do anything and everything we can to envelop you with our support. We have set up, working with the district attorney’s office, working with the governor’s office, support centers at Cal Expo and elsewhere where we are going to do everything we can for the families as we should as we must. They’re the ones suffering the most. And tonight at our vigil at 7:30, we have to hold them close even if they’re not there. But it’s not enough to just give our thoughts and prayers and support and then move on. That’s what happens too often. That’s what happens when these sorts of mass shootings occur throughout the country. Thoughts and prayers are not enough. What is the action we are going to take? In our city, we are already investing significant resources, unprecedented level of resources in young people and in gang intervention. Now, these were adults that were killed and we don’t know who the perpetrators were but it all starts upstream. We got thousands, tens of thousands of guns off the street last year and we can never prove what tragedies were averted as a result of those efforts. But we need to double or triple those efforts and put the resources behind getting more of these guns off the street. And so it is a time to support the victims and their families and anyone who witnessed this. But it’s also our opportunity to continue to take stock of what we can all do better to do everything in our power to try to avert the next tragedy.”

Q: We heard yesterday during one of the press conferences you encouraged people to continue to come to downtown. The bodies of the victims were still at the scene. Do you think that was a little bit too soon to send that message?

Steinberg: “I was asked the question and so I responded. I was referring to the days and the weeks and the months ahead. And I think it is very important, obviously that we put the victims first, but we also recognize that there are also a lot of hard-working men and women who have opened small businesses downtown. There are a lot of people who work downtown and I think it is important for the mayor to speak to the wide audiences here and to all of the issues that we are feeling in the moment. I don’t think it was too soon because it wasn’t isolated. I answered the question, ‘do I think people should go downtown?’ And my answer is yes. There are two responses to tragedy, which by the way could have occurred everywhere, and occurred at 2 o’clock in the morning. We can cower and we can say that we are going to isolate ourselves from one another or we can recognize that this downtown is a growing and beautiful place with a lot of challenges. Look at this week, we had three major concerts. You had Wicked. You have restaurants that have long waiting lists, reservations for people to get in. People need to be among each other. People need to be out. We’ve had enough with COVID and people being isolated. So it is not in any way inconsistent with our first responsibility and that is to care for the people who are suffering, the victims. And to continue to elevate the precautions that we’re already taking. Additional security. Additional lighting. Additional security cameras to assure and reassure people that downtown is safe and to say, live your lives because we need to be with each other.

Q: Yesterday, as the crime scene was still being processed we had a Kings game, we had things going on in the city. We had folks walking down the sidewalk on the same street as the families that are still mourning these victims whose bodies are still on the street. Do you think the city should have taken the approach to cancel all major events? Or do you think that was the right thing to do?

Steinberg: “First, a couple of things. I want to really thank our first responders. Our police and our fire departments. The heroic work that they did in the most difficult of circumstances, including really trying to save lives of victims. Do I think the city should have canceled all events? No, I don’t. Because I think we are capable of mourning the victims. I think we are capable of supporting their families and at the same time making sure that people can be connected with one another in positive ways. That’s really what downtown and a civic center is all about. People need to be connected. I think we are more than capable of both giving the space and the priority to the victims and at the same time encouraging people to be with one another.”

Q: Some people may be frankly scared to come downtown at this point. What’s your message to them? What is the city doing? Saturday night’s going to come pretty soon here.

Steinberg: “We have recently over the last several months invested over $8 million in what we call clean and safe Sacramento. That’s the money that’s being invested in additional security cameras, in lighting on J, K, and L streets. On additional security. A separate pot of money to do the same things in Old Sacramento. And so we are enhancing security. I would urge people to take precautions. To be aware of your circumstances. That’s the prudent thing to do. And I would say, and it’s just my opinion, get home early. I don’t know that people need to be out late, late hours. Maybe that’s just my age speaking. Get home at a decent hour. But come down, be aware of your circumstances. We’re taking extra precautions. Have a good time and live your life.”

Q: Is this going to be San Francisco? LA, where we’ve seen a recent uptick in crime? Should people be worried about that happening in this city?

Steinberg: “Crime is up all over the country. It was two-plus years ago right before COVID where the city went two years without a single youth homicide. This was not a youth homicide but those numbers are changing and there is an uptick in crime and in violent crime. It’s not unique to Sacramento. Yes, people should be concerned. We’re all concerned. The question is what do we do about it? I’m against any notion of defunding the police. I think the police play a very, very important role in protecting our community but they can’t do it alone. It has to be a real partnership with those who provide the youth services, with the community-based ambassadors who know what’s really going on, who can intervene if there’s a fight to make sure that it does not escalate into something more violent. So it’s all about a partnership. The city must invest in its public safety resources, including its police and fire. But public safety includes investing in young people, investing in our community. Building up the hope in these communities and not just in downtown but all of neighborhoods of Sacramento. I like to think that in my five years we have begun to change the arc of what we consider to be a core priority of our city. The city used to be just a service provider and that’s still our most important function. But now we are directly investing in communities, directly investing in youth and violence prevention and gang intervention and economic development and attracting new industry and the creative economy and affordable housing. And so that’s the modern role of a city and our city and it’s the combination of all those strategies that will help Sacramento get through this. I’m not a Pollyanna about any of it. I know what’s happening. I know that people are afraid. But I also see unprecedented amount of construction and building in our downtown, people moving downtown. I see all the new restaurants, the food scene, the new theater, the convention center, the Golden 1 Center, top-notch concerts and sporting events. And so we just have to be smart. We need to lead. We need to enhance all that we have started to do to provide people the assurance that they’re going to be safe and recognizing that there are never guarantees in life, that sometimes these terrible things happen and it’s our job to do everything we can to prevent it from ever happening again without guaranteeing that in any city in California and in the United States, especially back to the proliferation of these awful weapons – that these kinds of things will happen. We need help. We need help from the federal government. We’re getting a lot of help from the state government. The president has been very vocal on gun violence as has the governor. But we have to choose to live, to move forward and to do everything we can to keep people safe but also to promote the great quality of life in our city.”

Q: We ended our newscast last night [covering] the unity that we have seen so far. And Sacramento strong has been something we have seen. What makes Sacramento strong?

Steinberg: “This is a terrible crisis but it’s not our first crisis. You think about what we have been through over the past couple of years. I remember back when I was a new public official. Sacramento was hit by a number of hate crimes from white supremacists. Here’s the thing about Sacramento. We always step up. This is an inclusive community. It is an engaged community. It is a community that cares for one another. When one suffers, the others who weren’t the direct victims stand up. And then when it happens to the next group, the people who were victimized stand up for them. That’s the beauty of this community and it never ever changes. And so together we are going to envelop the victims of this family. That’s number one. We’re going to take our pain, we’re going to take our trauma, we’re going to learn our lessons and then we’re going to continue to be and to continue to become a great city.”

Sacramento Mayor Steinberg explains why he didn’t call for event closures downtown after mass shooting Source link Sacramento Mayor Steinberg explains why he didn’t call for event closures downtown after mass shooting

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