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Sacramento-area Olympic gold medalist discusses mental health, pressure athletes face

Olympic gold medalists living in the Sacramento region discussed the pressure on athletes and how the situation is beginning to change with regard to mental health stigma. Sprinter Millard Hampton spoke with KCRA 3 after the withdrawal of Simone Biles, who was widely regarded as the best in her sport for mental health reasons, when she won the gold medal in the 4x100m relay. Talking about his own high-intensity moment, he won the silver medal at the 200 meters of the 1976 Montreal Olympics. When he competed, he was counted every move, every moment. He explained that he barely turned his head during the race to see what had happened to another sprinter. “It would cost you one to two feet per yard. I lost about eight inches,” Hampton said. It was the final of his individual race. Hampton said there was another example of things not going as planned in the heat that followed. He explained that he was so nervous that he completely forgot to wear his track shoes before he was called to the track. He had to borrow a pair from his teammates and ran in shoes that were too big for him. He faced great pressure at the age of only 20, but it’s even worse for today’s Olympic athletes, Hampton said. Mention all opportunities to face external pressure for mobile phones and social media. Team USA welcomed the first mental health professional to support athletes at the Olympic Games in Tokyo this year. “The courage and courage that many athletes talk about mental health has resulted in major changes in professional sports. Loudly,” he said. Dr. Almond Gonzalez, an elite athlete’s mental health coach, said. Hampton is a change that we believe will help not only Olympic athletes, but others who face challenges as they work toward their goals.

Olympic gold medalists living in the Sacramento region discussed the pressure on athletes and how the situation is beginning to change with regard to mental health stigma.

Sprinter Millard Hampton spoke with KCRA3 after Simone Biles, who is widely regarded as the best ever in her sport. Withdrawal for mental health reasons..

He talked about his own high-intensity moment when he won the gold medal in the 4x100m relay at the 1976 Montreal Olympics and the silver medal in the 200m. When he competed, every move, every moment was counted for him.

He explained that he barely turned his head during the race to see what happened to another sprinter.

“It would cost you one to two feet per yard. I lost about eight inches,” Hampton said.

It was the final of his individual race. Hampton said there was another example of things not going as planned in the heat that followed. He explained that he was so nervous that he completely forgot to wear his track shoes before he was called to the track.

He had to borrow a pair from his teammates and ran in shoes that were too big for him. At just 20 years old, he faced immense pressure, but Mr Hampton said the situation was even worse for today’s Olympic athletes.

“I think they’re tougher because they’re dealing with more than we’ve dealt with,” said Hampton, referring to all opportunities to face external pressure for mobile phones and social media.

Team USA welcomed the first mental health officer to support athletes at the Olympic Games in Tokyo this year.

Dr. Almond Gonzalez, Mental Health Coach for Elite Athletes, said:

This is a change that Hampton believes will help not only Olympic athletes, but also other athletes who face challenges as they work toward their goals.

Sacramento-area Olympic gold medalist discusses mental health, pressure athletes face Source link Sacramento-area Olympic gold medalist discusses mental health, pressure athletes face

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