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Possible monkeypox cases in Sacramento County increases to 21

Sacramento County health officials reported more possible monkeypox cases over the weekend. There were seven more possible cases of monkeypox added to the Sacramento County Public Health Department’s dashboard, bringing the total to 21. As of Friday, that total was 14. The dashboard does not say whether these latest cases are related to any previously mentioned. Although it remains unknown, Sacramento County officials have expanded eligibility for monkeypox vaccinations. This category now includes men who have sex with men and, or, transgender people who meet at least one of the following criteria: Tested positive for an STD in the past two months Had two or more sexual partners in the past three weeks Attended or worked in commercial sex in the past three weeks Had anonymous sex in the past three weeks Engaged in transactional sex work in the past three weeks Previously, the right was only for people in close contact with those who are infected. In California, there are 250 “probable and confirmed cases” from July 14 at 2 p.m. However, that number is likely already out of date as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 267 confirmed cases of monkeypox. The CDC numbers were updated this Monday. Nationwide, there are 1,972 confirmed cases of monkeypox/orthopoxides. Almost a week ago, there were 929 cases in the United States. Worldwide, the CDC reports 13,340 cases as of July 18. Learn more here. Symptoms of monkeypox include fever, headache, muscle aches, back pain, swollen lymph nodes, chills and exhaustion. The patient may also develop a rash days later that often starts on the face and spreads to other parts of the body. It can cause damage. The illness can last anywhere from two to four weeks. Some people only develop the rash as their first symptom. Monkeypox virus can be transmitted when a person comes into contact with an animal, human or materials such as clothing or bedding contaminated with the virus. The virus can enter the body through the broken skin of a lesion, the respiratory tract, or the mucous membranes, which include the eyes, mouth, and nose.

Sacramento County health officials reported more possible monkeypox cases over the weekend.

There were seven more possible cases of monkeypox added to the Sacramento County Department of Public Health’s checklist, bringing the total to 21. As of Friday, that total was 14.

The dashboard does not identify whether these latest cases are related to any previous ones reported.

While that remains unknown, Sacramento County officials last week expanded eligibility for monkeypox vaccinations.

This category now includes men who have sex with men and, or, transgender people who meet at least one of the following criteria:

  • Tested positive for STDs in the past two months
  • Had two or more sexual partners in the past three weeks
  • Attended or worked in a commercial sex venue in the past three weeks
  • She has been having anonymous sex for the past three weeks
  • She has been engaged in transactional sex work for the past three weeks

Previously, eligibility was only for people in close contact with the infected.

In California, there are 250 “probable and confirmed cases” as of July 14 at 2 p.m.

However, this number is likely already outdated as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 267 confirmed cases of monkeypox. The CDC numbers were updated this Monday. Nationwide, there are 1,972 confirmed cases of monkeypox/orthopoxides. Almost a week ago, there were 929 cases in the United States.

Worldwide, the CDC reports 13,340 cases as of July 18.

Learn more here.

Symptoms of monkeypox include fever, headache, muscle aches, back pain, swollen lymph nodes, chills and exhaustion. The patient may also develop a rash days later that often starts on the face and spreads to other parts of the body. It can cause damage. The illness can last anywhere from two to four weeks. Some people only develop the rash as their first symptom.

Monkeypox virus can be transmitted when a person comes into contact with an animal, human or materials such as clothing or bedding contaminated with the virus. The virus can enter the body through the broken skin of a lesion, the respiratory tract, or the mucous membranes, which include the eyes, mouth, and nose.

Possible monkeypox cases in Sacramento County increases to 21 Source link Possible monkeypox cases in Sacramento County increases to 21

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