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PG&E worker shares his story of helping Electra Fire evacuees

Helicopters hovered over the site of the Electra Fire in Amador County on Saturday as crews from Pacific Gas and Electric Co. they were working to replace burned power poles to restore power. The day the fire broke out, PG&E relief operator Gabe Garcia just happened to be nearby doing a routine check on the Electra Powerhouse when he saw the fire. “While it was a little unnerving to see the flames myself, I think it was a priority to respond,” Garcia said. As the fire spread, nearly 100 people were forced out of the river canyon. “Seeing the fire coming over some hills and approaching quickly, it was obvious that everyone who was out in the quarter enjoying their time was interrupted,” Garcia said. .|READ MORE|Electra fire rises to 72% containment, all evacuation orders downgraded in Amador and Calaveras counties Authorities believe the fire started at the Vaught’s Beach Recreation Area, possibly by fireworks or a barbecue.It spread quickly and people who were celebrating the 4th of July and had to make a quick escape. Just over the ridge from the beach was Garcia and the sturdy Electra Powerhouse. Cal Fire crews battled the flames and Amador Sheriff’s deputies moved boulders and trees to clear the path on the only road to the Electra Powerhouse.” Once everyone saw the power plant, there was a little sigh of relief that there’s somewhere else we can go. There’s a place where we can be safe,” Garcia said. Soon, the nearly 100 people trying to enjoy the vacation on the river, surrounded by fire and took cover inside the power plant. “I was taken back a little bit, not just adults, but children, babies, old people, people from different countries speaking different languages,” he said. People like Milka Mikula and her family from the Valley Springs, who took refuge there.” it was the closest I’ve ever been to a fire. It was literally a stone’s throw away from us,” Mikula said. “It was very smoky in there, very hard not to breathe.” it has been through fires, floods and storms. We know he can handle almost anything thrown at him,” Garcia said. For six hectic hours, Garcia tried to keep the evacuees calm. But he said the real hero is a 9-year-old girl who asked people to respond to a simple question on a piece of paper.” I looked at the scroll and said, ‘I’m so thankful we could have a place for you to come be safe.’ And he smiled and said, ‘You’re not the only one who said that,'” Garcia said. Arson investigators are still are investigating the exact cause of the fire.On Saturday, all evacuation orders had been downgraded to warnings as crews continued to gain leverage on the flames.

Helicopters hovered over the site of the Electra Fire in Amador County on Saturday as crews from Pacific Gas and Electric Co. they were working to replace burned power poles to restore electricity.

On the day of the fire, PG&E relief operator Gabe Garcia happened to be nearby doing a routine check on the Electra Powerhouse when he saw the fire.

“Although it was a little disturbing to see the flames myself, I think it was a priority to respond,” Garcia said.

As the fire spread, nearly 100 people had to fight their way out of the river canyon.

“Seeing the fire coming up over some hills and coming in fast, it was obvious that everybody was out in the quarter enjoying their time, they were interrupted,” Garcia said.

| READ MORE | Electra fire rises to 72%, all evacuation orders downgraded in Amador and Calaveras counties

Authorities believe the fire started at the Vaught’s Beach Recreation Area, possibly from fireworks or a barbecue. It spread quickly and people celebrating the Fourth of July had to flee quickly.

Just over the ridge from the beach was Garcia and the sturdy Electra Powerhouse.

Cal Fire crews battled the flames and Amador Sheriff’s deputies moved boulders and trees to clear the path on the only road to the Electra Powerhouse.

“Once everyone saw the power plant, there was a little sigh of relief that there’s somewhere else we can go. There’s a place we can be safe,” Garcia said.

Soon, the nearly 100 people, who were trying to enjoy the vacation on the river, were surrounded by fire and took cover inside the power plant.

“I was taken back a little bit, not just adults, but children, babies, old people, people from different countries who spoke different languages,” he said.

People like Milka Mikula and her family from Valley Springs, who fled there.

“That was the closest I’ve ever been to a fire. It was literally a stone’s throw away from us,” Mikula said. “It was quite smoky in there, very hard not to breathe.”

“[The powerhouse] it has been through fires and floods and storms. We know he can handle almost anything thrown at him,” Garcia said.

For six hectic hours, Garcia tried to keep the evacuees calm. But he said the real hero is a 9-year-old girl who asked people to answer a simple question on a piece of paper.

“I looked at the scroll and said, ‘I’m so thankful we could have a place to come and be safe.’ And he smiled and said, ‘You’re not the only one who said that,'” Garcia said.

Arson investigators are still investigating the exact cause of the fire. By Saturday, all evacuation orders had been downgraded to warnings as crews continued to gain leverage on the flames.

PG&E worker shares his story of helping Electra Fire evacuees Source link PG&E worker shares his story of helping Electra Fire evacuees

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