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People becoming desensitized to COVID-19

As the number of cases of COVID-19 increases in California, a new study from the University of California, Davis shows that many people become desensitized to the virus and are less worried about following public health guidelines. Twitter Health News: Observational Studies was recently published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research Infodemiology. People in Sacramento told KCRA3 that they agreed with the study. “I think it’s absolutely true,” said Emily Brockley. “I try my best to avoid expecting it from others.” “The general public is fed up with it and we want to continue our lives.” Bill Lidostar said. “But everyone gets sick and hopes there are no supervariants that the vaccine doesn’t cover.” Researchers at the University of California, Davis, School of Communication, said 1,465 news from Twitter to 2020 users. I looked up the article and the corresponding post. coronavirus. According to published research, they found: “As the number of casualties increased, news articles seemed to lose the ability to induce anxiety among readers. Desensitization explains why increased threats do not induce widespread behavioral compliance with public health guidance. In short, over time, people have become less concerned about the effects of the virus. This is a concern for Dr. Dean Brunberg, who is responsible for UC Davis Health’s pediatric infections. “First of all, it’s counterintuitive,” he said. “And second, it’s sad to think that if the increase in mortality is the exact opposite of what we usually expect, people will be less worried about it.” Blumberg said. He added that he was concerned about low vaccination rates. In Sacramento, false information is spreading online. Hannah Stevens, a PhD student in Communication and the lead author of the treatise, told KCRA about the study: Throughout the pandemic, the general public has been repeatedly exposed to horrific media coverage of the health risks and deaths of COVID-19, but nothing more is surprising. Over time, individuals may be experiencing anxiety relief, despite increasing threats. The discussion has begun. Hopefully it will help people realize that just because they are not feeling serious anxiety does not mean that the problem is gone. “The University of California, Davis research team hopes that their research will help public health authorities communicate in the future in the event of another health crisis.

As the number of cases of COVID-19 increases in California, a new study from the University of California, Davis shows that many people have become insensitive to the virus and are less concerned about following public health guidelines.

paper, “COVID-19 Desensitization to Health News: Observational Study” It was recently published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research Infodemiology.

People in Sacramento told KCRA3 that they agreed with the study.

“I think it’s absolutely right,” said Emily Brockley. “I do my best and try not to expect it from others.”

“The general public is fed up with it and we want to continue our lives,” said Bill Lidostar. “But everyone gets sick and hopes there are no super variants that the vaccine does not cover.”

Researchers at the University of California, Davis’ Faculty of Communication Studies examined 1,465 news articles and their corresponding posts by users from Twitter to 2020 that talked about the coronavirus.

According to published research, they found:

“As the number of casualties increases, news articles appear to have lost the ability to induce anxiety among readers. Desensitization is why the increased threat does not induce widespread behavioral compliance with guidance from public health authorities. I will provide an explanation. “

In short, over time, people have become less concerned about the effects of the virus.

This is a concern for Dr. Dean Brunberg, who is responsible for pediatric infectious diseases at the University of California, Davis.

“First of all, it’s counterintuitive,” he said. “And second, it’s sad to think that higher mortality rates make people less worried about it, in the exact opposite of what we usually expect.”

Bloomberg added that he was concerned about Delta variants, low vaccination rates in Sacramento, and the spread of false information online.

Hannah Stevens, a PhD student in Communication and the lead author of the treatise, sent this statement to KCRA about her research.

“Desensitization helps people deal with horrific experiences. When we are repeatedly exposed to horrific and stressful things, we get used to it, or at least become less responsive to it. Through a pandemic. , The public has been repeatedly exposed to horrifying media coverage of COVID-19’s health risks and deaths. Despite increasing threats, individuals may reduce anxiety over time That’s not surprising. It may be an opportunity to start a discussion. I hope people can realize that just because they don’t feel serious anxiety doesn’t solve the problem. I am. “

A research team at the University of California, Davis hopes that their research will help public health authorities communicate in the future in the event of another health crisis.

People becoming desensitized to COVID-19 Source link People becoming desensitized to COVID-19

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