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Outside Yellowstone National Park, flooded towns struggle to recover

As officials try to reopen Yellowstone National Park to tourists after the record floods hit southern Montana, some of those most affected by the disaster are living away from the spotlight of the famous park and leaning heavily on each other for to get their lives out of the mud. around the Fromberg rural community, the Clarks Fork River flooded nearly 100 homes and severely destroyed a large irrigation ditch serving many farms. The city mayor says about a third of the flooded homes are too far to be repaired. Above video: Officials seek quick repairs in Yellowstone floods Not far from the riverbank, trailer Lindi O’Brien’s house was raised high enough to avoid major damage. But she found water in her barns and sheds, lost some of her poultry, and saw her recently deceased parents’ house flooded with many feet. serve as gateways to Yellowstone – you have not reached Fromberg to see its destruction. O’Brien said the lack of attention came as no surprise given the city’s location away from major tourist routes. of which they work themselves. “We take care of each other,” O’Brien said as she and two longtime friends, Melody Murter and Aileen Rogers, combed items squeezed from the mud scattered across her property. O’Brien, an art teacher for the local school, was building her parents’ house in hopes of turning it into a holiday rental. She’s not sure she can be saved now. “When you’re tired and hurt, it’s okay to stop,” O’Brien told Murter and Rogers, whose clothes, hands and faces were muddy. Above video: Couple describes when they were at home drowned in the Yellowstone River Yellowstone will reopen in part at 8 a.m. Wednesday, more than a week after more than 10,000 visitors were forced to leave the park when Yellowstone and others rivers overflowed their banks after being swollen by melting snow and several inches of rainfall. However, the northern half of the country’s oldest national park, which is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year, is expected to remain closed this summer, if not longer, along with one of the park ‘s main entrances through Montana. The closure will deprive visitors of the opportunity to see Tower Fall and the Lamar Valley, one of the best places in the world to see wolves and grizzly bears. Meanwhile, outside the population centers bordering the park, there is a maze of damaged roads. A main bridge leading to the town of Fishtail collapsed, diverting traffic through a single-lane country road. There are about 500 people in Fishtail. Lee Johnson and his wife and daughter run the Montasia restaurant, which is so named because it combines Malaysian and Montana cuisine. He said businesses have plummeted. “When we first opened it after the flood, it started to die. And you start to feel that sense of dread. I did all this, I put all this money, I started this business and the people? Can’t you get here anymore?” Johnson said Johnson and Yoki’s Malaysian wife rented a 124-year-old Fishtail landmark earlier this year, moving their restaurant from across the state. For Yokie, the business was a dream come true. “I’m not from Montana, I wanted to have something,” she said, adding that doing business with her family was her biggest goal. “I’m not sure how much time I have left, so the time I have left I want to be with my family, to work with them every day, to see them every day,” he said. that he is humbled by the opportunity to support his wife and is determined to keep the restaurant open while the flood damage is repaired.

As officials try to reopen Yellowstone National Park to tourists after record floods hit southern Montana, some of those most affected by the disaster are living away from the spotlight of the famous park and leaning on each other to they make their living out of the mud.

In and around the Fromberg rural community, the Clarks Fork River flooded nearly 100 homes and caused severe damage to a large irrigation ditch that serves many farms. The city mayor says about a third of the flooded homes are too far away to be repaired.

Video above: Employees looking for quick flood repairs in Yellowstone

Not far from the river bank, Lindy O’Brien’s trailer house was raised high enough to avoid major damage. But she got water in her barns and sheds, lost some of her poultry and saw her recently deceased parents’ house flooded with many feet of water.

Elected officials appearing to tour the damage to Red Lodge and Gardiner – Montana’s tourist towns that serve as gateways to Yellowstone – have not arrived in Fromberg to witness the devastation. O’Brien said the lack of attention came as no surprise given the city’s location away from major tourist routes.

She said she was not outraged, but gave up on the idea that if Fromberg were to recover, its roughly 400 inhabitants would have to do much of the work themselves.

“We take care of each other,” O’Brien said as she and two longtime friends, Melody Murter and Aileen Rogers, combed items squeezed from the mud scattered across her property. O’Brien, an art teacher for the local school, was building her parents’ house in hopes of turning it into a holiday rental. Now she is not sure she can be saved.

“When you’m tired and doing bad things, it ‘s okay to stop,” O’Brien told Murter and Rogers, whose clothes, hands and faces were stained with mud.

Video above: Couple describes how the house was swept away by the Yellowstone River

Yellowstone will reopen in part at 8 a.m. Wednesday, more than a week after more than 10,000 visitors were forced to flee the park when Yellowstone and other rivers overflowed their banks after being blown away by melting snow and several inches. rainfall.

However, the northern half of the country’s oldest national park, which is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year, is expected to remain closed this summer, if not longer, along with one of the park ‘s main entrances through Montana. The closure will deprive visitors of the opportunity to see Tower Fall and the Lamar Valley, one of the best places in the world to see wolves and grizzly bears.

Meanwhile, outside the population centers bordering the park, there is a maze of damaged roads. A main bridge leading to the town of Fishtail collapsed, diverting traffic through a single-lane country road. There are about 500 people in Fishtail.

Lee Johnson and his wife and daughter run the Montasia Restaurant, named after a combination of Malaysian and Montana cuisine. He said businesses have plummeted.

“When we first opened it after the flood, it started to die. And you start to feel that sense of dread. I did all this, I put all this money, I started this business and the people? Can’t you get here anymore?” said Johnson.

Johnson and his Malaysian wife Yoki leased a 124-year-old Fishtail landmark building earlier this year, moving their restaurant from another part of the state. For Yokie, business was a dream come true.

Video above: Floods in Yellowstone hit nearby Montana cities

“I’m not from Montana, I wanted to own something,” he said. Doing business with her family was her biggest goal. Yokie said running the restaurant gives her strength as she battles cancer.

“I’m not sure how much time I have left, so the time I have left I want to be with my family, to work with them every day, to see them every day,” he said.

Johnson said he is humbled by the opportunity to support his wife and is determined to keep the restaurant open as the flood damage is restored.

“You are connecting your wagon to this community and it is just a matter of continuing,” he said.

Outside Yellowstone National Park, flooded towns struggle to recover Source link Outside Yellowstone National Park, flooded towns struggle to recover

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