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Now the word CURRY is racist: Food blogger says it’s time to cancel the ‘British colonial’ term

Now the word curry is racist: food bloggers say it’s time to cancel the term “British colony” in South Asian cuisine

  • South Asian American Chaheti Bansal, 27, shares home cooking recipes online
  • She told her followers that the word curry was no longer used because of its Western origin.
  • Bansal says Indian food “couldn’t bother to learn the real name” used by whites to bring together very different Asian foods.


South Asian-American food bloggers are calling on people to cancel the word curry because of their relationship with British colonialism.

In recent fallout since increased surveillance of the history of the nation’s empire, critics have said that the word curry is used too often to bring together very different foods from different regions. Say there is.

Chaheti Bansal, 27 years old California She shared her home cooking online, shared video recipes, and called on people to cancel the word “curry.”

In a video that has been watched more than 3.6 million times since being shared by Buzzfeed Tasty, Bansal said:

“There is a saying that Indian food changes every 100km, but we still use this comprehensive term, which is popular with white people who couldn’t bother to learn the name of the actual food. Can’t learn yet. “

Food bloggers are calling for the word curry to be canceled because the word curry originated in the British colonial era and is used by Westerners as a generic term for very different dishes.

27 years old has said since then NBC Asian American He said it wasn’t “cancelling the word altogether”, but “terminating its use by people who didn’t know what it meant.”

Outlets say South Asian-American cooks spent their lives in the face of “misunderstandings” about their food, and now they report that they want to celebrate it. increase.

Bansal told NBC: “When you think about South Asian food, you shouldn’t just think about curry.

Photo: Chaheti Bansal featured on her various social media channels

Photo: Chaheti Bansal featured on her various social media channels

“You can move like 100km and get a completely different kind of food.

“And it’s a completely different language and a different culture, and it shows that our food has so much variety that it’s unrecognizable.

But she also said the term is used regularly in South Asian countries.

She added: “My partner is Sri Lanka. I have friends in Malayalam and Tamil. Yes, they use the word curry.

“I enjoy their curry. Even the name of their curry has a very specific traditional name that is paired with it, or it points to something very specific. But you shouldn’t put all our food together under this term.

There are many explanations for the origin of the word curry, but the most popular is that it was invented by an Englishman who misunderstood the Tamil word “kari” for “source.”

Its first use dates back to the mid-18th century when members of the East India Company traded with Tamil merchants in southeastern India.

Critics believe that the word curry is used too often to put together a variety of Asian dishes.

Critics believe that the word curry is used too often to put together a variety of Asian dishes.

Historically, the food served at British curry houses is Indian food cooked to British flavors, but there is a growing demand for authentic Indian food.

Some of Britain’s most popular dishes, including chicken tikka masala, were inspired by Indian cuisine, but adapted to Western flavors and, as a result, reflected traditional dishes made in India. Rarely.

Instagram food blogger Nisha Vedi Pawar, 36, reflects Bansal’s feelings and tells NBC: Don’t want to soak everything like Old Bay?

“You don’t want to put everything in good old American French mustard. Similarly, not everything in Ticca sauce.”

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Now the word CURRY is racist: Food blogger says it’s time to cancel the ‘British colonial’ term Source link Now the word CURRY is racist: Food blogger says it’s time to cancel the ‘British colonial’ term

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