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Northern California mothers warn about the dangers from fentanyl

Like most parents, Denise Gentile captured every moment of Jade English’s daughter’s landmarks and accomplishments. Gentil has a stack of photo albums full of photos during Jade’s 17 years. “I’m so grateful for all the memories I had with her,” Gentil said. “We did so much together.” “Every picture was a precious time between mom and daughter, but these memories are now all she has to keep.” These were actually her last birthdays I had to spend with her, “Gentil said of one of the photos. In March On the 4th of last year, Gentil’s phone rang. She was told that Jade was in the hospital and then rushed to her daughter’s side. “No one had prepared me for what I was going to do,” Gentil said. Jade was in life support. “I just lost my legs,” he said. “My knees became completely weak when I saw my daughter lying there with all these wires and tubes.” “Doctors were unable to save Jade’s life.” “He was my only child and now he is gone,” said Gentil. “In the days that followed, Gentile learned that Jade was another victim of a growing fentanyl epidemic involving counterfeit prescription drugs.” Only later did I learn that it was a Percocet that had taken Not Half. Not even the whole. “But it was fentanyl,” Gentil said. “Jade suffered from anxiety and depression.” “My daughter was poisoned to death,” said Gentil. “She was deceived to death. What he got he thought was a medicine pill. “Until today, Gentil still does not know where the medicine came from. I do not want any other family to go through it,” he said. “It’s the worst thing in the world. A parent should not never to live longer than his child. ” “The tragedy can also be felt in a house in Valley Springs.” It was unthinkable, “said Lita Rose. “My daughter has never had a history of drug use.” On January 2, 2021, Rose’s phone rang. “I was wondering why she was calling,” Rose said. Rose said her 39-year-old daughter Jamila Ward, a mother of three, was dead. “It was like a kick in the stomach,” Rose said. Like Jade, Jamila thought she was taking Percocet, but no Percocet was found on her system. It was fentanyl. “I’m thinking about it all the time,” he added. “I think about it all the time, every time I wake up. It’s the first thing I think about when I wake up in the morning and it’s the last thing I think about when I wake up. Go to bed.” “Like Gentile, Rose is looking for answers. ‘I want to know who got it,'” Rose said. “I want to know exactly what happened to my daughter.” “I feel like someone should be held accountable. I see it as if he was killed, because he was killed,” Rose added. “She did not know about fentanyl.” This story was created as part of a special report on the fentanyl-related death epidemic in Northern California. We looked at how the debate evolved over the past year, education and publicity in schools, and efforts to change legislation in California. We have also heard from teenagers who say that the problem is bigger and deeper than you think. Return to KCRA.com later to view the full report.

Like most parents, Denise Gentile captured every moment of Jade English’s daughter’s landmarks and accomplishments. Gentile has a stack of photo albums full of photos during Jade’s 17 years.

“I’m so grateful for all the memories I had with her,” Gentil said. “We did so much together.”

Each picture was a precious time between mom and daughter, but these memories are now all they have to keep.

“This was actually her last birthday I had to spend with her,” Gentil said of one of the photos.

On March 4 last year, Gentil’s phone rang. She was told that Jade was in the hospital and then rushed to her daughter’s side.

“No one had prepared me for what I was walking,” Gentil said.

Jade was in life support.

“I just lost my footing,” he said. “My knees became completely weak when I saw my daughter lying there with all these wires and tubes.”

Doctors failed to save Jade’s life.

“He was my only child and now he is gone,” said Gentil.

In the days that followed, Gentile learned that Jade was another victim of a growing fentanyl epidemic involving counterfeit prescription drugs.

“It was only later that I learned it was a Percocet that had taken half. Not a whole. But it was fentanyl,” Gentil said.

Jade suffered from anxiety and depression.

“My daughter was poisoned to death,” Gentil said. “She was deceived to death. What she took she thought was a drug pill. She thought she was taking and it was not.”

To this day, Gentil does not know where the drug came from.

“I do not want to go through this every day, but I do not want any other family to go through this,” he said. “It’s the worst thing in the world. “A parent should never live longer than his child.”

Tragedy can also be felt in a house in Valley Springs.

“It was unthinkable,” said Lita Rose. “My daughter has never had a history of drug use.”

On January 2, 2021, Rose’s phone rang. Her daughter’s girlfriend was frantic on the other end.

“I was wondering why he was calling,” Rose said.

Rose said her 39-year-old daughter Jamila Ward, a mother of three, was dead.

“It was like a kick in the stomach,” Rose said.

Like Jade, Jamila thought she was taking Percocet, but no Percocet was found in her system. It was fentanyl.

“I think about it all the time,” he added. “I think about it all the time, every time I wake up. It’s the first thing I think about when I wake up in the morning and it’s the last thing I think about when I go to bed.”

Like Gentile, Rose is looking for answers.

“I want to know who got it from,” Rose said. “I want to know exactly what happened to my daughter.”

He feels that someone must be held accountable.

“I see it as killing her, because they killed her,” Rose added. “She did not know about fentanyl.”


This story was created as part of a special report on the fentanyl-related death epidemic in Northern California. We looked at how the debate evolved over the past year, education and publicity in schools, and efforts to change California legislation. We have also heard from teenagers who say that the problem is bigger and deeper than you think. Return to KCRA.com later to view the full report.

Northern California mothers warn about the dangers from fentanyl Source link Northern California mothers warn about the dangers from fentanyl

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