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North Carolina ‘miracle girl’ turns childhood injury into campaign

For the past 14 years, Jesse Keaton has been called a “miracle girl”. But the name comes from a nightmare. At age 6, she fell from her dad’s tractor in Yadkin County, North Carolina, while mowing hay. “In an interview with sister station WXII in 2008, days after the accident, Keaton described the horrific moments of trying to save herself as the blades kept going.” The big wheel pulled me back and went all over my body. he said in the interview. “I cut my arm a little, but I did not feel it.” She suffered injuries to her leg – which required amputation just above the knee – her ribs, a few toes and the rest of her leg, which still plagues her now as a 20-year-old. Keaton said she has met many other mutilated people since then and their injuries involved farm equipment more often than she expected. According to the National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety, a child dies in an agricultural incident about every 3 days. “Here in Yadkin County, it is very common to put children in tractors,” Keaton said. . “There are families who tell me ‘It happened to you but it will not happen to me.’ But I think this is something they need to be educated about because it can happen to anyone. No one knew it was going to happen to me. “Not only does she support tractor safety now, but Keaton is also trying to give back to those who go through injuries like she did. “July 1.” It’s something that keeps my mind away from my accident, “Keaton said. The movements also serve as a distraction for the “miracle girl” who has struggled with her injuries and the lasting impact she has had on her life. “, explained. As she thinks about the weeks after her injury, Keaton said she is trying to focus on the medical team that helped her recover at Brenner Children’s Hospital. She says they owe them a huge thank you for saving her life, even if she is 14 years late. And he hopes to work with them one day on a pre-med track at Appalachian State University this fall. ” my. I hope one day to make my career there. ”

For the past 14 years, Jesse Keaton has been called a “miracle girl”. But the name comes from a nightmare.

At age 6, she fell from her dad’s tractor in Yadkin County, North Carolina, while mowing hay. In an interview with sister station WXII in 2008Days after the accident, Keaton described the horrific moments of trying to save himself as the blades kept going.

“The big wheel pulled me back and went all over my body,” he said in the interview. “I cut a little in my hand, but I did not feel it.”

She suffered injuries to her leg – which required amputation just above the knee – her ribs, a few toes and the rest of her leg, which still causes problems now as a 20-year-old.

Keaton said she has met many other mutilated people since then and their injuries involved farm equipment more often than she expected. According to National Center for Children of Rural and Rural Health and Safetya child dies in an agriculture-related incident about every 3 days.

“Here in Yadkin County, it’s very common to put kids in tractors,” Keaton said. “There are families who tell me ‘It happened to you but it will not happen to me.’ But I think this is something they need to be educated about because it can happen to anyone. “Nobody knew it would happen to me.”

Not only does she support the safety of tractors now, but Keaton is also trying to give back to those who go through injuries like hers. Since 2020, she organizes blood donations on the anniversary of her accident – July 1.

“It’s something that keeps my mind off my accident,” Keaton said. “It keeps me in a good mood, because I help give back to the community and to those desperately seeking blood as I once was.”

The moves also serve as a distraction for the “miracle girl”, who has struggled with her injuries and the lasting impact she has had on her life.

“I feel like anyone is going through a kind of traumatic experience, their date is affecting them, like a ‘sad date’,” he explained.

As she thinks about the weeks after her injury, Keaton said she is trying to focus on the medical team that helped her recover at Brenner Children’s Hospital. She says they owe them a huge thank you for saving her life, even if she is 14 years late. And he hopes to work with them one day, entering a pre-med track at Appalachian State University this fall.

“I was between prosthesis and pre-treatment,” he said. “I completely decided on pre-med because I thought it would be great to work in the same place that helped me after my accident. I hope one day to make a career out of it there.”

North Carolina ‘miracle girl’ turns childhood injury into campaign Source link North Carolina ‘miracle girl’ turns childhood injury into campaign

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