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NOAA shares first images from GOES-T weather satellite to improve forecasts for the West

On Wednesday morning, NOAA shared the first images of the recently launched GOES-T satellite. GOES-T was launched into space and the Atlas-V rocket from Cape Canaveral on March 10. Once it starts to work, it will produce essentials. data for weather forecasters, especially those predicting West American imagery taken from satellites 22,000 miles above Earth show the exact details that this new data could provide. | VIDEO ABOVE | How the new NASA satellite will help track wildfires and speculation . Each channel really looks at the environment through different lenses, reflecting different different characteristics. Two of those channels will provide a satellite image of the visible, true color image of what is happening below. You see our KCRA 3 team uses satellite images that are often seen when talking about their predictions. Some channels will provide information on cloud conditions, atmospheric humidity, smoke emission, fog and lightning with consistent accuracy. For Northern California, this means the best forecast for events such as river floods, wildfires and severe thunderstorms. Eventually GOES-18 will replace GOES-17, which is currently based in the Western United States Shortly after its launch, GOES-17 began to experience problems with the cooling system. The cooling system has been redesigned to avoid such a problem by GOES-18. So far, NOAA scientists say the devices are working as expected. It will continue testing, verification and adaptation exercises in the next few months. GOES-18 is scheduled to launch early next year.

On Wednesday morning, NOAA shared the first images of the recently launched GOES-T satellite.

GOES-T has been send in navigation In an Atlas-V rocket and rocket from Cape Canaveral on 10 March. Once operational, it will provide important information to weather forecasters, especially Western forecasters.

Photographs taken from a 22,000-mile satellite into space show just how much detail this new data could provide.

| VIDEO ABOVE | How the new NASA satellite will help detect wildfires and forecasts

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NOAA’s GOES-T satellite will take 16 different images. Each image offers a different view of the weather and the ground, providing a wide range of forecasting tools to determine when to make predictions.

The GOES-T satellite is equipped with a tool called Advanced Baseline Imager, which collects data and generates images through 16 different channels. Each channel really looks at the environment through different lenses, reflecting different different characteristics.

Two of those channels will provide a satellite image of the visible, true color image of what is happening below. You see our KCRA 3 weather team uses satellite imagery often when talking about their predictions.

Other stations will provide information on cloud conditions, humidity, smoke, precipitation and lightning with accuracy.

For Northern California, this means the best forecast for events such as river floods, wildfires and severe thunderstorms.

Eventually GOES-18 will replace GOES-17, which is currently based in the Western United States Shortly after its launch, GOES-17 began to experience problems with the cooling system. The cooling system has been redesigned to avoid such a problem by GOES-18.

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So far, NOAA scientists say the devices are working as expected. It will continue testing, verification and adaptation exercises in the next few months.

GOES-18 is scheduled to launch early next year.

NOAA shares first images from GOES-T weather satellite to improve forecasts for the West Source link NOAA shares first images from GOES-T weather satellite to improve forecasts for the West

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