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No college degree? More employers than ever don’t care

If you don’t have a four-year college degree, you’re almost alone. The majority of working-age adults in the United States do not. You might think that there are few opportunities for Fortune 500 companies to develop high-paying careers with profit and growth potential. After all, so many jobs require a bachelor’s degree, but Google, Amazon, Salesforce. Such programs provide paid on-the-job training, benefits, coaching, and access to a network of employees and alumni. In the face of reality, for the past five years, employers have tried to solve two things. One is the long-predicted shortage of skilled labor, especially in technology. The other is the need to proactively address systematic inequality and unconscious prejudice in recruitment and promotion practices. We realized that we needed to expand our search for promising candidates because of the growing awareness of lack of race and ethnicity in order to remain competitive. , Gender, zip code, diploma dominates talent. “We are a talent-based company. That is our only asset, so we have broadened our horizons,” said Pallavi Verma, managing director of consulting firm Accenture. Since launching its first apprenticeship program in Chicago in 2016, it has accepted 1,200 apprentices in 35 cities. “Is part of our talent strategy.” YearUp is an organization that offers tuition-free, college-eligible vocational training in 29 locations in the United States. We are also looking for promising apprentices in partnership with employers such as Accenture, as are many nonprofits and community colleges across the country. YearUp specifically provides training in business and technical skills to prepare a company’s job candidates before recommending them to their employer. The group’s main mission is to help close the gap in opportunity, especially for minority applicants. “If you need a four-year college degree, 70% of African Americans and 80% of Latino Americans are excluded,” said Morris Applewhite, YearUp’s Chief Corporate Engagement Officer. One of YearUp’s free tuition programs. After working as an Accenture apprentice, he was hired full-time as a junior analyst. Since then, he has been promoted twice and is now working as a senior analyst in cloud computing. “It was a life-changing experience,” said Rodnes. According to IBM’s Director of Career, Skills and Performance, Kelly Jordan, we will create an apprenticeship program that started in 2017. By the end of this year, we plan to train more than 1,000 apprentices and hire most of them. According to the company, it is 50% higher than the average income in the area where people work. According to Jordan, when someone is hired, salaries usually spike from there. Up to 20% of IBM’s jobs no longer require a four-year college degree, but of course many large companies. Then you will climb the ladder. Ultimately, the candidate must have a bachelor’s degree or higher. Apprentices can also find support in that regard. For example, at IBM, some training courses allow up to 45 apprentice college credits for software engineering apprentices. In Bank of America, job seekers without a college degree have an internal program called Pathways. It provides salaries and benefits, including on-the-job training and related training, coaching, and tuition refunds to college. To date, the company has hired 10,000 people from the low- and middle-income communities through this program and aims to hire another 10,000 by 2025. Accenture, along with Aon, has created a playbook that other employers can use as a guide in creating their own apprenticeship programs. Meanwhile, there is growing interest in bridging the gap between opportunity and wealth. At the end of last year, a coalition of CEOs formed One Ten. It is a non-profit organization that aims to promote the goal of hiring, promoting and promoting one million black people without a four-year degree in the next decade. Due to the lack of infrastructure to directly procure, train and guide potential apprentice candidates, we are now able to work with companies like Multiverse to help create and manage apprenticeship programs. The UK-based company was founded in 2016 and is just getting started. We are active in the United States this year. Since its inception, it has provided more than 300 employers with 5,000 apprenticeship reviews, training, coaching, networking and placement. More than half of the program participants come from people of color, half are women, and one-third come from resource-poor communities. The company said. The majority of apprentices who complete the program will stay with their employer for at least two years. To date, Multiverse has 12 US clients, including Google, Verizon and ClassPass. But that number could more than double by the end of the year, said Sophie Ruddock, vice president and general manager of North American operations.

If you don’t have a four-year college degree, you’re almost alone. The majority of working-age adults in the United States do not.

You might think that there is little chance of a high-paying career with profit and growth potential at a Fortune 500 company. After all, so many jobs require a bachelor’s degree.

But your chances may be better than you think, thanks to the expanding network of white-collar apprenticeship programs that lead to work in top-tier companies, including major tech companies like Google, Amazon, and Salesforce. not.

Such programs provide paid on-the-job training, benefits, coaching, and access to a network of employees and alumni.

Facing reality

Over the last five years, employers have tried to solve two things.

One is the long-predicted lack of skilled workforce, especially in technology. Second, there is a need to proactively address systematic inequality and unconscious prejudice in recruitment and promotion practices.

As there is growing awareness that race, ethnicity, gender, zip code, and diplomas do not monopolize talent in order to remain competitive, we realize that we need to expand our search for promising candidates. I did.

Pallavi Verma, Senior Managing Director of a consulting firm, said: AccentureCreated its first apprenticeship program in Chicago in 2016 and has since accepted 1,200 apprenticeships in 35 cities. “”[The program] It’s part of our talent strategy. “

Year Up is an organization that provides college-qualified vocational training in 29 states with no tuition fees. place.And like many nonprofits and community colleges across the country, it Partner with employer, To find promising apprentices, like Accenture.

Year Up specifically provides business and technical skills training to prepare potential candidates for a company’s work Before recommending them to your employer.

The group’s main mission is to help close the gap in opportunity, especially for minority applicants. “Requires a four-year college degree excludes 70% of African Americans and 80% of Latin Americans,” said Morris Applewhite, YearUp’s Chief Corporate Engagement Officer.

A few years ago, 30-year-old Chance Rodness found his way to Accenture after graduating from one of the year-up tuition-free programs. After working as an Accenture apprentice, he was hired full-time as a junior analyst. Since then, he has been promoted twice and said he is now working as a senior analyst in cloud computing.

“that is A life-changing experience. “

Big blue moves towards skill-based adoption

IBM It was one of the first technology companies to create an apprenticeship program launched in 2017.

IBM’s Director of Career, Skills and Performance, Kelly Jordan, said he plans to train more than 1,000 apprentices and hire most of them by the end of this year.

According to the company, its average apprenticeship salary is about 50% higher than the average local income on which people work. And when someone is hired, they usually see wage increases from it.

Up to 20% of IBM’s jobs no longer require a four-year college degree, Jordan said.

But of course, many large companies ultimately require candidates to earn a bachelor’s degree or higher in order to climb the ladder.

Apprentices may also find support in that regard. For example, at IBM, some training courses allow up to 45 apprentice college credits for software engineering apprentices.

so Bank of AmericaJob seekers without a college degree will be considered for beginner and possibly higher positions through an internal program called Pathways. To date, the company has hired 10,000 people from the low- and middle-income communities through this program and aims to hire another 10,000 by 2025.

There are likely to be more apprentices

There is reason to believe that skills are more important than apprentice availability and employment degrees.

together AonAccenture has created a playbook that other employers can use as a guide in creating their own apprenticeship programs.

Meanwhile, there is growing interest in bridging the gap between opportunity and wealth. At the end of last year, a coalition of CEOs formed One Ten. It is a non-profit organization that aims to promote the goal of hiring, promoting and promoting one million blacks without a four-year degree in the next decade.

Employers who do not have the infrastructure to directly procure, train and guide promising apprentice candidates can now work with companies like Multiverse to help create and manage apprenticeship programs. rice field.

The UK-based company was founded in 2016 and has just started operations in the United States this year.We have provided it since our establishment Examination, training, coaching, networking and placement of 5,000 apprentices across more than 300 employers.

The company said more than half of the program’s participants came from people of color, half were women, and one-third came from underfunded communities. The majority of apprentices who complete the program will stay with their employer for at least two years.

these days, Multiverse Acquired 12 US clients, including Google. Verizon And the classpath. But that number could more than double by the end of the year, said Sophie Ruddock, vice president and general manager of North American operations.

“I see a surge in demand.”

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