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Niece of missing Navajo woman walking almost 2,400 miles for change

For Ella Mae Begay’s family and friends, the nightmare continues. “The only thing he tells me is ‘we’re still investigating. We’re fighting. We’re trying to do everything we can to solve the case,'” said Seraphine Warren, Begay’s niece. The 62-year-old Navajo woman disappeared on June 15, 2021 from her home in Sweetwater, Arizona. However, despite the elapsed time, there are still no answers. Warren said it is a problem only fueled by limited resources and lack of resources. communication between local and federal agencies. “I’m very concerned about how the process is and how slow it is going,” he said. “I still don’t see that sense of urgency. I still feel like I’m running frantically trying to find my aunt.” Begay’s disappearance is especially harsh on relatives like Warren. Since his aunt disappeared, Warren has been a key advocate for families with similar situations. She has made a dozen trips to demand changes from local leaders. The sister station KOAT contacted her in February 2021 during her most recent trip to the capital of the Navajo Nation. There he met with President Jonathan Nez. However, this time, Warren is thinking more and more: Washington, DC , said. Over the next few weeks, Warren will walk to the country’s Capitol. It will start at your aunt’s house in Arizona, and then it will go a long way. A few days earlier, preparations for the trip had become emotional for Begay’s niece. “Why am I walking around, in every room, looking for what to take when my aunt didn’t get that chance?” she said. “When I left, I hugged my kids. I told them where I was going to be. My aunt didn’t get that chance.” Through his trip around the country, Warren plans to pique the interest of federal lawmakers. and persuade leaders to put more pressure on law enforcement agencies that handle cases of missing and murdered Indians. “When there was a shooting in Texas, they practically put the police in place. If they mishandle something here, they should take responsibility and say, ‘Hey, we did this wrong.’ Police officers and leaders should know what is going on themselves, “Warren said. She also hopes to be a voice for other grieving families, some of whom she plans to meet along the way. “I feel like this ride is. It’s going to grab a lot of people’s attention in any way they can relate,” he said. “It’s going to happen. The pain I’m probably going to endure with my pain, I know someone is going to relate.” Doing what she knows best. “I don’t know what I’m doing, but I just need attention on this and someone has to do something,” Warren said. Begay’s niece is not sure when she is expected to arrive in Washington, DC. He said the trip would take about 779 hours and cover nearly 2,400 miles. Watch the video above to see the full story.

For Ella Mae Begay’s family and friends, the nightmare continues.

“Everyone [authorities] tell me it’s “we’re still investigating”. We are fighting. We are trying our best to resolve the matter, “said Seraphine Warren, Begay’s niece.

The 62-year-old Navajo woman disappeared on June 15, 2021 from her home in Sweetwater, Arizona.

Hearst OwnedSeraphine Warren

Photo: Ella Mae Begay

However, despite the elapsed time, there are still no answers.

Warren said it is a problem only fueled by limited resources and a lack of communication between local and federal agencies.

“I’m very concerned about how the process is and how slow it is going,” he said. “I still don’t see that sense of urgency. I still feel like I’m running frantically trying to find my aunt.”

why a Navajo woman walks almost 2,400 miles to the national chapter

Hearst OwnedSeraphine Warren

Photo: Ella Mae Begay

Begay’s disappearance is especially harsh on relatives like Warren.

Since his aunt disappeared, Warren has been a key advocate for families with similar situations.

She has made a dozen trips to demand changes from local leaders.

The sister station KOAT contacted her in February 2021 during her most recent trip to the capital of the Navajo Nation. There he met with President Jonathan Nez.

However, this time, Warren is thinking more and more: Washington, DC

“During one of my prayers, what I talked about is that I’m going to do this walk to DC because I’m not the only one who’s dealing with this,” he said.

Over the next few weeks, Warren will walk to the country’s Capitol.

It will start at your aunt’s house in Arizona, and then it will go a long way.

A few days earlier, preparations for the trip had become emotional for Begay’s niece.

“Why am I going around, in every room, looking for something to take when my aunt didn’t get that chance?” she said. “When I left, I hugged my kids. I told them where I was going to be. My aunt didn’t get that chance.”

Through his trip across the country, Warren plans to pique the interest of federal lawmakers and persuade leaders to put more pressure on law enforcement agencies handling cases of missing and murdered Indians.

When a shooting occurred in Texas, they practically put the police on the spot. If they mishandle something here, they should take responsibility and say, “Hey, we did this wrong.” They should say, “Hey, we’re missing so much police force.” I mean, police officers and leaders should know what’s going on themselves, “Warren said.

He also hopes to be a voice for other grieving families, some of whom he plans to meet along the way.

“I feel like this ride is going to get a lot of people’s attention in any way they can relate,” he said. “It’s going to happen. The pain I’m probably going to endure with my pain, I know someone is going to relate.”

Doing what you know best.

I don’t know what I’m doing, but I just need to pay attention to this and someone has to do something, ”Warren said.

Begay’s niece is not sure when she is expected to arrive in Washington, DC

She said the trip will take her about 779 hours and she will walk nearly 2,400 miles.

Watch the video above to see the full story.

Niece of missing Navajo woman walking almost 2,400 miles for change Source link Niece of missing Navajo woman walking almost 2,400 miles for change

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