Health

New research confirms that racism in health care settings increases vaccine hesitancy among ethnic minority groups

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A new study examining the associations between racism and xenophobia and COVID-19 prevention found that 1 in 10 people from ethnic minorities who refuse to be vaccinated face racism at the health center since the onset of the disease. They also experienced twice as much racism as those who received treatment.

The results of the study, which The newspaper Journal of the Royal Society of Medicineshowing the effect of direct racism on lack of confidence in health system to treat the disease, which also predicts rejection.

Participants in the study included 633 adults from ethnic minorities who were vaccinated with COVID-19 between December 2020 and June 2021. The study found that 6.69% of participants who refused the treatment reported having a lack of service or treatment than other people. at the doctor because of race or ethnicity.

Lead author Dr. Elise Paul, Chief Research Officer at Cancer and Statistics at UCL, said, “Our research confirms evidence from pre-existing disasters, which found associations between factors racism and distrust of the health system and doctors among ethnic minorities. adults. “

The researchers said their findings highlight the important role that the NHS plays in restoring racial trust. minority groups to increase immunization coverage between these different groups.

The researchers said the public health campaign to increase COVID-19 immunization coverage in ethnic minorities should include not only reliance on vaccines, but also strategies to prevent racism and xenophobia and support people with they face discrimination.

Dr. Paul added, “Efforts to encourage confidence in the COVID-19 vaccine are not enough to prevent imbalances in vaccination. on small tribes. “

Dr Mohammad Razai, Research Fellow at the Center for Public Health, St George’s University, London, notes, “Our research shows how racism undermines trust in the system and prevents minorities from interacting. and the NHS. Failure to tackle racism will lead to conflict.


People from all major ethnic and racial groups in the United States report high rates of discrimination related to COVID-19


Learn more:
Racism, lack of trust in the health system and prevention of COVID-19: a long-term study of 633 British adults from minority groups, Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine (2022). DOI: 10.1177 / 01410768221095241

hint: New research confirms that racism in the health system is increasing the risk of immunization among ethnic minorities (2022, May 5) restored 5 May 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022 -05-racism-health-vaccine-hesitancy- ethnic.html

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New research confirms that racism in health care settings increases vaccine hesitancy among ethnic minority groups Source link New research confirms that racism in health care settings increases vaccine hesitancy among ethnic minority groups

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