New Laws Taking Effect in California on July 1, 2024 4o

A number of new laws on topics ranging from housing to hidden fees will come into effect in California on July 1.

Here are some of the laws likely to directly impact the average Californian.

Hidden Fees

Two new bills target hidden fees.

  • Senate Bill 478 and Assembly Bill 537 mandate that the advertised or displayed price for most goods or services must include all fees and other charges required for purchase, excluding government taxes and fees.
    • SB 478 applies to most businesses, with exceptions for those under different advertising regulations.
    • AB 537 specifically addresses short-term lodging rates, such as hotels or peer-to-peer platforms like Airbnb.

Drug Testing Kits

Businesses with “on-sale general public premises” alcohol licenses, like bars and restaurants, must sell drug-testing kits at prices not much higher than wholesale cost. They must also display a notice stating, “Don’t get roofied! Drink spiking drug test kits available here. Ask a staff member for details.”

Menstrual Products for Students

Assembly Bill 230, signed into law last October, expands the existing requirement for public schools to provide free menstrual products in bathrooms. The law now includes grades 3-5, in addition to grades 6-12. The bill’s author, Assemblymember Eloise Reyes, noted that 10% of girls have their first period by age 10.

Right to Repair

Senate Bill 244 requires electronics manufacturers to make documentation and spare parts or tools available to repair or maintain products priced at $50 or higher for wholesale. For products priced at $100 or more, parts and documentation must be available for at least seven years after the product was last manufactured.

Housing

Senate Bill 684 aims to expedite the approval process for subdivision maps to encourage more housing construction. Local agencies must approve maps for projects in urban areas, provided they meet certain criteria, including a limit of 10 housing units. The legislature’s analysis indicates that small lot divisions facilitate more medium-density housing, such as duplexes, fourplexes, garden apartments, and townhomes.

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