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New imaging technique allows researchers to see gene expression in brains of live mice in real time

The team led by the University of Minnesota Twin Cities has developed a new technique for imaging mRNA molecules in the brains of living mice. By modifying the mouse’s natural way of producing mRNA labeled fluorescent proteins (shown above), the researchers were able to see when and where the mouse brain produces Arc mRNA. Credit: Hye Yoon Park, University of Minnesota Twin Cities

The University of Minnesota Twin Cities has developed a new technique that allows scientists and engineers, for the first time, to detect mRNA molecules in the brains of living mice. The study reveals new information about how memories are created and stored in the brain and could give scientists new information about diseases like Alzheimer’s.

The paper is printed inside Submissions by the National College of Science (PNAS).

There is still a lot of privacy surrounding the system of how memory is actually created and stored in computer. It is well known that mRNA — a type of RNA involved in protein synthesis — is produced during the process of creating and storing memories, but the technology of studying this process at the cellular level is limited. Past studies often include classification beraye to check their brains.

A team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota Twin Cities researcher has developed a new technique that allows scientists to call RNA through the brain. mouse while he was alive.

“We still know very little about memory in the brain,” said Hye Yoon Park, a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Minnesota and lead author of the study. “It is known that mRNA synthesis is important for memory, but it has never been possible to compare this in the living brain. Our work has a significant contribution to this field. Now we have this new technology that biologists will be able to can be used for different tests and for different tests and memory tests in the future. “

The team’s course, led by the University of Minnesota, includes genetic engineering, dual-image imaging, and advanced image processing software. By modifying the mouse’s natural way of producing mRNA labeled fluorescent proteins (proteins derived from jellyfish), the researchers were able to see when and where the mouse brain produced the Arc. mRNA, the specific type of molecule they are looking for.

Watch a 3D video that captures the hippocampus area of ​​a living mouse brain. Credit: University of Minnesota

Because the mouse is alive, researchers can study it for a long time. Using this new system, the researchers performed two experiments on the mouse in which they were able to see in real time over a month what the neurons — or neurons — do while the mouse is create and store memories.

Historically, neurons have speculated that certain groups of neurons in the brain burn out when memory is acquired, and these same neurons re-ignite when memories of that moment or event occur. However, in two experiments, the researchers found that different groups of neurons are shot every day resulting in memory in the mouse.

Within several days after the mouse created this memory, they were able to detect a small group of cells that invaded, or caused Arc mRNA every day, in retrosplenial how (RSC) area of ​​the brain, the organization they believe is responsible for long-term memory retention.

“Our investigation is based on that memory design and bring them back, ”says Park.“ If we can understand how this happens, it will help us a lot in understanding Alzheimer’s disease and others. memory-Related diseases. Maybe people with Alzheimer’s disease are still storing memories somewhere – they can’t bring them back. So in the long run, maybe this research can help us overcome these diseases. “

In addition to Park, the team includes researchers from Seoul National University researchers By Hun Lee, Jae Youn Shim, Hyungseok Moon, and Dong Wook Kim; and researchers at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology Jiwon Kim, Jang Soo Yook, and Jinhyun Kim.


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Learn more:
Byung Hun Lee et al, Real-world enhancement of mRNA synthesis while creating memory in live dances, Submissions of the National College of Science (2022). DOI: 10.1073 / pnas.2117076119

hintThe new imaging technology allows researchers to see the appearance of the cell in the brains of live mice in real time (2022, July 6) retrieved 6 July 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-07-imaging -technique-gene-brains – mice.html

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New imaging technique allows researchers to see gene expression in brains of live mice in real time Source link New imaging technique allows researchers to see gene expression in brains of live mice in real time

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