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Nearly 1 million in CA face long-term health issues due to unsafe drinking water, audit says

A new report released by the California State Auditor says nearly 1 million Californians could face long-term health problems after drinking unsafe drinking water, which could include liver and kidney damage along with an increased risk of cancer. (Video above: Top headlines for July 26, 2022)The audit also criticized the State Water Resources Control Board, saying it lacked the urgency to address the state’s troubled water systems.| MORE | Read the full report here According to the report, there were more than 370 water systems that were failing in December 2021, providing water to 920,000 people.” Nearly 240 of these water systems have failed for at least three years and more than 150 have has been failing for five years. Additionally, for 2022, State Water Board data shows an additional 432 water systems serving more than 1 million people are at risk of failure,” the audit said. The majority of failed water systems were in disadvantaged communities in the Central Valley, with more people affected in San Joaquin, Stanislaus and Merced counties. The audit said the State Water Board had not prioritized the processing of water systems’ funding applications to improve water quality, explaining that the average time for water systems to complete their applications and receive funding had doubled in recent years. five years from 17 months — to 33 months. Part of that trend, the audit says, is due to a change in state law that allowed the State Water Board’s focus to shift to helping smaller and less sophisticated water systems. State Water Board staff say working with smaller water systems has helped increase processing times for their applications. However, the audit found that “the State Water Board’s cumbersome application process and lack of adequate communication and follow-up with water systems also contribute to the delay in funding.” which included streamlining its application process by no longer asking for “redundant application documents and financial information,” developing a process to fast-track urgent water projects, and developing benchmark metrics at key phases of the application and funding process.

A new report released by the California State Auditor says nearly 1 million Californians could face long-term health problems after drinking unsafe drinking water, which could include liver and kidney damage along with an increased risk of cancer.

(Video above: Top headlines for July 26, 2022)

The audit also criticized the State Water Resources Control Board, saying it lacked the urgency to address the state’s troubled water systems.

| MORE | Read the full report here

According to the report, by December 2021 there were more than 370 problematic water systems, which provide water to 920,000 people.

“Nearly 240 of these water systems have been failing for at least three years, and more than 150 have failed for five years. Additionally, for 2022, State Water Board data shows that an additional 432 water systems serving more than 1 million people are at risk to fail,” the audit said.

The majority of failed water systems were in disadvantaged communities in the Central Valley, with the most people affected in San Joaquin, Stanislaus and Merced counties.

The audit said the State Water Board had not prioritized the processing of water systems’ funding applications to improve water quality, explaining that the average time for water systems to complete their applications and receive funding had doubled in recent years. five years from 17 months — to 33 months.

Part of that trend, the audit says, is due to a change in state law that has allowed the State Water Board’s focus to shift to helping smaller and less sophisticated water systems.

State Water Board staff say working with smaller water systems has helped increase application processing times.

However, the audit found that the State Water Board’s “burdensome application process and lack of adequate communication and follow-up with water systems also contribute to funding delays”.

The comptroller’s office made several recommendations to the state water board, including streamlining its application process by no longer asking for “unnecessary application documents and financial information,” developing a process to fast-track urgent water projects and developing metrics for benchmarks in the key. phases of the application and funding process.

Nearly 1 million in CA face long-term health issues due to unsafe drinking water, audit says Source link Nearly 1 million in CA face long-term health issues due to unsafe drinking water, audit says

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