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mpacts of DACA still felt on the Central Coast 10 years later

DACA’s tenth anniversary was celebrated on Wednesday. DACA stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program. Former President Barack Obama introduced the program in 2012 to offer protection against deportation to eligible immigrants who came as children. The program affects more than 800,000 people, including Adriana Gonzalez. Sebastián, a former DACA student, university graduate, and now a DACA professional, “Just thinking that ten years later, there is still no solution. There has to be something. And maybe starting with people who have DACA is a start, “Adriana said. She says many want a solution for the 11 million undocumented, but DACA is at least a start.” And while there are certain people who may not want me here “I’ve experienced a lot more than they do,” Adriana said. As she grows up, Adriana recalls struggling with mental health issues while trying to find her own identity. Congressman Jimmy Panetta says Immigrants make an impact and contribute a lot here on the Central Coast. ” , to our economy, “Panetta said. Panetta says many of these men and women contribute to the country’s labor shortage.” So in the House of Representatives. they are fighting for them and for the passage of the Dream and Promise act. It’s time for the Senate to do its job and accept that bill and do the same, “Panetta said. For years, the program has been on unstable ground. This uncertainty has made immigrants, known as dreamers, afraid that “Our students are also specializing and pursuing careers that are having a positive impact on the country,” Macias said. Miriam Vazquez-Gonzalez, undocumented link to Hartnell “We’ve really seen how students who are DACA recipients have gone beyond community college education and continued their careers and become professional DACA recipients,” he said. Regardless of where DACA is, Vázquez-Gonzalez said student education persists, and the Hartnell Mi Casa Center will continue to serve its undocumented students.

DACA’s tenth anniversary was celebrated on Wednesday.

DACA stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program.

Former President Barack Obama introduced the program in 2012 to offer protection against deportation to eligible immigrants who came as children.

The program affects more than 800,000 people, including Adriana González Sebastián, a former DACA student, a college graduate and now a DACA professional.

“Just thinking that ten years later, there is still no solution. There has to be something. And maybe starting with people who have DACA is a start, “Adriana said.

She says many want a solution for the 11 million undocumented, but DACA is at least a start.

“And while there are certain people who may not want me here, I’ve experienced many more than I do,” Adriana said.

When it comes to growing up, Adriana remembers struggling with mental health issues while trying to find her own identity. Adriana said it is more than her undocumented status.

She is a professional who wants to contribute to her community.

Congressman Jimmy Panetta says immigrants impact and contribute a lot here on the central coast.

“We are lucky on the central coast to know the benefits that immigrants bring to our community, our culture, and of course our economy,” Panetta said.

Panetta says many of these men and women contribute to the country’s lack of manpower.

“Therefore, in the Chamber of Deputies we fight for them and for the approval of the Dream and Promise Act. It’s time for the Senate to do its job and accept that bill and do the same, “Panetta said.

For years, the program has been on unstable ground. This uncertainty has made immigrants, known as dreamers, afraid that a single court order could change their lives forever.

Clementina Macias, director of University Support Programs at California State Monterey Bay, says her college students can invest in themselves and the community without fear of DACA.

“Our students are also specializing and pursuing careers that are having a positive impact on the country,” Macias said.

Miriam Vazquez-Gonzalez, an undocumented liaison for Hartnell College, says DACA has impacted the lives of its students and the community.

“We’ve really seen how students who are beneficiaries of DACA have gone beyond community college education and continued their careers and become professional recipients of DACA,” he said.

Regardless of where DACA is, Vázquez-González said that education for undocumented students persists and that the Hartnell Mi Casa Center will continue to serve its undocumented students.

mpacts of DACA still felt on the Central Coast 10 years later Source link mpacts of DACA still felt on the Central Coast 10 years later

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