California

Mountain guide is killed after falling 2,500 feet from peak of California’s Mount Shasta 

Mountain guide killed after climber slips on treacherous climb up Mount Shasta, California: Three people linked to each other fall to 2,500 feet

  • Jillian Elizabeth Webster, 32, of Redmond, Oregon died while accompanying a couple on Mount Shasta
  • A friend and girlfriend accompanied Webster on the Avalanche Gulch
  • The three climbers were linked and when the man lost his footing, all three were descended the icy slope.
  • The trio fell to 2,500 vertical feet after the icy foot became treacherous in the morning sun.
  • Two more climbers had to be rescued the same day when they also fell
  • Tuesday, a sixth climber had to be lifted from the dangerous mountain

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A day of mountain climbing on CaliforniaMount Shasta became tragic when three climbers crashed thousands of feet, killing a guide and injuring two others.

Jillian Elizabeth Webster, 32, of Redmond, Oregonassisted a pair on top of the dangerous mountain on Monday when one of the climbers slipped, and the other two pulled down 1,500 to 2,500 feet of snow and ice, according to the Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Department.

“They were connected,” sheriff’s spokeswoman Courtney Kreider said San Francisco Gate.

Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office and the U.S. Forest Service assisted six climbers from Mount Shasta this week

On Monday alone, five climbers fell thousands of feet down the icy slope of Mount Shasta

On Monday alone, five climbers fell thousands of feet down the icy slope of Mount Shasta

On Monday alone, five climbers fell thousands of feet down the icy slope of Mount Shasta

It was generally a dangerous day on the mountain. In less than 24 hours on Monday, six climbers had to be rescued from the 14,180-foot mountain.

Webster’s group was above Helen Lake when they fell around 8:30 a.m. Monday when sunlight hit the newly fallen snow in an area called Avalanche Gulch.

“What makes it dangerous now is the change from really cold to really hot,” Kreider told the Gate. ‘We had snow on the weekend, but a little snow, and it made this thin layer of ice in Avalanche Gulch, and when it warms up, that thin layer of ice slips off, so you have to have really good climbs – climbs that are really in can dig ice. ‘

Jillian Elizabeth Webster, 32, a mountain guide, did not respond when she fell near Mount Shasta on Monday. She was medevacked to an area hospital where she was pronounced dead

Jillian Elizabeth Webster, 32, a mountain guide, did not respond when she fell near Mount Shasta on Monday. She was medevacked to an area hospital where she was pronounced dead

Jillian Elizabeth Webster, 32, a mountain guide, did not respond when she fell near Mount Shasta on Monday. She was medevacked to an area hospital where she was pronounced dead

A nurse climbing the mountain tried to give Webster first aid, but she did not respond. Siskiyou County Sheriff's Office assisted the surviving climbers of the mountain

A nurse climbing the mountain tried to give Webster first aid, but she did not respond. Siskiyou County Sheriff's Office assisted the surviving climbers of the mountain

A nurse climbing the mountain tried to give Webster first aid, but she did not respond. Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office assisted the surviving climbers of the mountain

A nurse who climbed into the area tried to give Webster first aid, but she did not respond.

She was taken by helicopter to Mercy Mount Shasta, but she could not be rescued.

The male climber in Webster’s group suffered head injuries and a compound fracture to his leg, according to Krieder.

He has already been released from Mercy Medical Center Redding. The girlfriend remains under observation in the same hospital with a lower leg injury.

“It was just a perfect storm of bad conditions, people on the mountain and inexperienced,” said lead ranger Nick Meyers of the U.S. Forest Service. San Francisco Chronicle.

‘Even a total pro would find it difficult to stop or even arrest with such conditions.’

Dozens of climbers are rescued each year from the treacherous slopes of Mount Shasta

Dozens of climbers are rescued each year from the treacherous slopes of Mount Shasta

Dozens of climbers are rescued each year from the treacherous slopes of Mount Shasta

At 12:30 a.m. on the same day, a male climber who was also hitting Avalanche Gulch slipped and fell 1,000 feet down the icy slope. He was also medevacked from the mountain and is expected to recover.

The rest of his group went up the mountain, but at 4 p.m., a female climber in the same party lost her footing and dropped 1,000 vertical feet, Krieder told the Gate.

“It took a few hours to locate her,” the spokeswoman told the newspaper. “They found her shortly after 6pm and took her to the airborne hospital.”

The U.S. Forest Service warned climbers to consult with them before tackling the mountain under the shifting conditions.

But Tuesday, a male climber from Long Beach, California, had to be rescued from the mountain.

“We work in an environment where things happen,” climbing guide David Cressman told the Mailonline. ‘Climbing and weather can change in a few hours.’

The Forest Service coordinates about a dozen search and rescue operations each year and usually sees about one person killed each year, according to Meyers.

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Mountain guide is killed after falling 2,500 feet from peak of California’s Mount Shasta  Source link Mountain guide is killed after falling 2,500 feet from peak of California’s Mount Shasta 

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