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Mom whose 1-year-old son died in hot car shares warning

A mother from Florida, whose son died in a hot car, shared her heartbreaking story in the hope that it would prevent future tragedies. Makia Wallace’s 1-year-old son Jace died after leaving him in a car for seven hours by a caregiver in 2020. Wallace initially thanked God for giving her the strength to discuss her story. “Jay Lucas Leslie was a unique child. He did not demand much but he gave everything,” he said. “He was tender, smart and energetic … he loved animals, especially dogs, and he loved playing basketball. But most importantly, he loved Jesus and he led me to love him too.” Wallace said the day Jace died he received a phone call telling her to hurry to school. “As soon as we got on the road, I sat down to take a closer look and noticed the yellow tape,” he said. Wallace said he broke down as he approached first responders and police. “I ran before I fell to my knees and screamed, ‘God, what happened? What happened to my baby? “” He remembers. She said the news hit her like a ton of bricks when officials told her Jayce had died after seven hours in a 105-degree car. Wallace said she became bitter and angry and wanted revenge after her son’s death. No charges were brought against the man who left Jayce in the hot car. “The pain I have endured has given me a greater purpose in life,” he said. “These tragedies can be avoided and that is to be hoped for.” She said her son is in Heaven and often tells her, “Go on, Mom.” Along with Wallace was Sheriff John Mina, representatives of Safe Kids Worldwide, the National Road Safety Administration. and the Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association to raise awareness of the tragedy of car deaths and to share strategies to prevent further losses. Mina urged parents to leave something, their shoe, wallet or phone in their back seat to remind them to check before getting out of the car. There is also an effort to force automakers to add new technology that warns drivers when children are left behind in the back seat. Technology is already here to fill our memory gaps, from manufacturers like Vayyar, Aptiv and VitaSense. Officials say “active sensors can even see through blankets to detect a child’s breath or pulse” using this new technology. They use sensors and radar to detect the presence of a child. Alerts include horns, flashing lights and even text messages. “Some manufacturers are already installing rear passenger warning systems. Customers definitely want to see the rear passenger safety features on display,” said Shannon Kominowski, general manager of Holler Hyundai. He says it is an option for his two largest SUVs.

A mother from Florida, whose son died in a hot car, shared her heartbreaking story in the hope that it would prevent future tragedies.

Makia Wallace Jace’s 1-year-old son died after leaving him in a car for seven hours by a caregiver in 2020.

Wallace initially thanked God for giving her the power to discuss her story.

“Jay Lucas Leslie was a unique child. He did not demand much but he gave everything,” he said. “He was tender, smart and energetic … he loved animals, especially dogs, and he loved playing basketball. But most importantly, he loved Jesus and he led me to love him too.”

Wallace said the day Jace died she received a call telling her to rush to school.

“As soon as we got on the road, I sat down to take a closer look and noticed the yellow tape,” he said.

Wallace said she broke down as she approached first responders and police.

“I ran before I fell to my knees and screamed, ‘God, what happened? What happened to my baby? ” remembers.

She said the news hit her like a ton of bricks when officials told her that Jayce had died after seven hours in a 105-degree car.

Wallace said she became bitter and angry and wanted revenge after her son’s death. No charges were brought against the man who left Jayce in the hot car.

“The pain I have endured has given me a greater purpose in life,” he said. “These tragedies can be prevented and that is hopeful.”

She said that her son is in Paradise and often tells her, “Go on, mom.”

Wallace teamed up with Sheriff John Mina, representatives of Safe Kids Worldwide, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association to raise awareness of the tragedy of hot car deaths and share strategies to prevent further losses.

Mina urged parents to leave something, their shoe, wallet or phone in their back seat to remind them to check before getting out of the car.

There is also an effort to force automakers to add new technology that warns drivers when children are left behind in the back seat.

Technology is already here to fill our memory gaps, from manufacturers like Vayyar, Aptiv and VitaSense.

Officials say “active sensors can even see through blankets to detect a child’s breath or pulse” using this new technology.

They use sensors and radar to detect the presence of a child. Alerts include horns, flashing lights and even text messages.

Some manufacturers already install rear passenger warning systems.

“Customers definitely want to see the rear passenger safety features on display,” said Shannon Kominowski, general manager of Holler Hyundai.

She says it is a choice for her two largest SUVs.

Mom whose 1-year-old son died in hot car shares warning Source link Mom whose 1-year-old son died in hot car shares warning

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