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Mass. woman’s effort inspires 4-way kidney swap

For anyone who needs a kidney transplant, the wait can be excruciating. The COVID-19 pandemic has only complicated the process of salvation. But the kindness of a Massachusetts woman saved more than one life through her efforts to help. Eric Jenson has always been quite active. He enjoys mountain biking and hockey, and even had the energy to keep up with caring for a new baby. But in 2020, he started to lose the effort. “I started seeing my nephrologist more often. My numbers were dropping a lot faster than I expected,” Jenson said. Already struggling with kidney disease in his family, Jenson’s doctor at Tufts Medical Center put him on the list for a kidney transplant.Dr. Ashtar Chami, a nephrologist at Tufts Medical Center, said: “Generally, it takes six months, sometimes over a year or over two years, to fit through this system. Eric was also approaching dialysis at the time,” he said. Dr. Ashtar Chami, a nephrologist at Tufts Medical Center. Tsami said the wait for a compatible kidney is long because one-third of donors are not compatible due to either blood type or antibody problems. Jenson and his family turned to Facebook, posting his story and hoping for help. Enter Courtney Martin. He was sitting in the doctor’s office and was being treated when he saw this position. “I read the story and called my husband and he said, ‘What’s wrong with the hip?’ And I said, ‘Well, I can not run Chicago. But I’ll give my kidney to someone,’ “Martin said. Jenson and Martin are complete strangers, but he said his Facebook post reached home. “Eric is involved in the music scene in Boston. My husband is involved in the music scene. Eric plays hockey. My husband plays hockey. They have a little son. We have a little son,” said Martin. “If I were in her position, I would like everyone to come forward and try to help him and I just knew I could do it. I’m healthy. I’m extremely active.” “We are really very careful with our donors. We want to make sure we are not putting anyone at risk,” said Tsami. . Martin was right, but not just for Jenson. He also met another stranger named Dan, whose brother was willing to donate but was irreconcilable. “Courtney here, with her super universal kidney donor, could also be a candidate for Dan and his brother happened to be a candidate for me,” Jenson said. In December 2021, everyone came in for surgery. “After the successful transplants, all four patients got to know each other.” When we all met, there was a lot of hugging and I was able to exchange messages with Dan’s mom who is very grateful and very sweet, “Martin said. “In my mind, this was not a big deal for me. If anyone needed help, you helped. Eric needed a kidney. I could help. There was no hesitation.” Chami said she had never heard of a donor who regretted choosing to help, even a stranger. For the person in need, the results can be incredible – they change their whole life in a few days. He adds that the COVID-19 pandemic has led to a serious drop in donations and transplant surgery. He hopes people will learn more about the process because it can really save a life.

For anyone who needs a kidney transplant, the wait can be excruciating. The COVID-19 pandemic has only complicated the process of salvation. But the kindness of a Massachusetts woman saved more than one life through her efforts to help.

Eric Jenson has always been quite active. He enjoys mountain biking and hockey, and even had the energy to keep up with caring for a new baby. But in 2020, he started to lose the effort.

“I started seeing my nephrologist more often. My numbers were dropping a lot faster than I expected,” Jenson said.

Already struggling with kidney disease in his family, Jenson’s doctor at Tufts Medical Center put him on the list for a kidney transplant.

Dr. Ashtar Chami, a nephrologist at Tufts Medical Center, said: “Generally, it takes six months, sometimes over a year or over two years, to fit through this system. Eric was also approaching dialysis at the time.” said Dr. Ashtar Chami, nephrologist at Tufts Medical Center.

Chami said the wait for a compatible kidney is long because one-third of donors are incompatible because of either blood type or certain antibody problems.

Jenson and his family turned to Facebook, posting his story and hoping for help.

Enter Courtney Martin. He was sitting in the doctor’s office and was being treated when he saw this position.

“I read the story and called my husband and he said, ‘What’s wrong with the hip?’ And I said, ‘Well, I can’t run Chicago. But I’ll give my kidney to someone,’ “Martin said.

Jenson and Martin are complete strangers, but he said his Facebook post reached home.

“Eric is involved in the music scene in Boston. My husband is involved in the music scene. Eric plays hockey. My husband plays hockey. They have a little son. We have a little son,” said Martin. “If I were in her position, I would like everyone to come forward and try to help him and I just knew I could do it. I’m healthy. I’m extremely active.”

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Eric Jenson and Courtney Martin

Martin applied for a donor and went through the screening process, including examinations and appointments with doctors and social workers.

“We are really very careful with our donors. We want to make sure we do not put anyone at risk,” Chami said.

Martin was right, but not just for Jenson. He also met another stranger named Dan, whose brother was willing to donate but was irreconcilable.

“Courtney here, with her super universal kidney donor, could also be a candidate for Dan and his brother happened to be a candidate for me,” Jenson said.

For this team, it was a joke. In December 2021, everyone came in for surgery. After the successful transplants, all four patients met

“When we all met, there was a lot of hugging and I was able to exchange messages with Dan’s mom who is very grateful and very sweet,” Martin said. “In my mind, this was not a big deal for me. If anyone needed help, you helped. Eric needed a kidney. I could help. There was no hesitation.”

Chami said she has never heard of a donor regretting choosing to help someone, even a stranger. For the person in need, the results can be incredible – they change their whole life in a few days.

He adds that the COVID-19 pandemic has led to a serious drop in donations and transplant surgery. He hopes people will do it learn more about the process because it can really save a life.

Mass. woman’s effort inspires 4-way kidney swap Source link Mass. woman’s effort inspires 4-way kidney swap

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