Local

Many migrants from border camp staying in US – San Bernardino Sun

ELLIOT SPAGAT, MARIA VERZA, JUAN A. LOZANO

Del Rio, Texas (AP) — Many Haitian migrants who camp in a small border town in Texas have been released in the United States, two U.S. officials said, and thousands of camps were immediately expelled. It overturned the official statement of the Biden administration that it had faced it.

Haitians have recently been released “very, very large”, according to thousands of US officials. Officials who knew the operation directly were not allowed to discuss the issue on Tuesday and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Many were released after being notified to appear at the Immigration Bureau within 60 days. As a result, border guard agents have a shorter processing time than ordering them to appear in immigration courts, demonstrating the speed of movement of the authorities.

The Department of Homeland Security is taking Haitians by bus from Del Rio to the Rio Grande Valley along the El Paso, Laredo, and Texas borders, and added a flight to Tucson, Arizona this week, officials said. They are processed by border guards at those locations.

A second U.S. official, also directly informed and speaking on condition of anonymity, said that a large number of Haitians were being processed under immigration law and were on board an exile flight to Haiti that began on Sunday. Said not. Officials couldn’t be more specific about that number.

The White House faces sharp bipartisan accusations. Republicans say the Biden administration’s policies have led to the belief that Haitians will be in exile. Democrats have expressed anger this week after images of border guard agents riding horses using offensive tactics against immigrants spread in word of mouth.

U.S. officials recently scrambled for a bus to Tucson, but relied on planes because they couldn’t find enough carriers, both officials said. A Coast Guard plane took Haitians from Del Rio to El Paso.

Release in the United States occurred despite the signal of extensive efforts to expel Haitians during their flight to Haiti under a pandemic-related authority that denies immigrants the opportunity to seek asylum. A third U.S. official who was not allowed to discuss the operation said seven daily flights to Haiti were planned from Wednesday.

The description of the massive release observed by Associated Press journalists at the Del Rio bus stop conflicts with a statement from the previous day by Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mallorcus, who visited Del Rio to promise swift action.

“If you come to the United States illegally, you will return home, your journey will be unsuccessful, and you will endanger your life and the lives of your family,” he said at a press conference on Monday.

According to some estimates, the release came in a swift effort to empty the camp under a bridge that accommodated more than 14,000 people on weekends in a town of 35,000 people. Texas Governor Greg Abbott said when he visited Del Rio on Tuesday that the county chief executive officer said a recent count at the camp was about 8,600 migrants.

The criteria for determining who was sent to Haiti and who was released in the United States were unclear, but two U.S. officials said one adult was a priority for exile.

The Department of Homeland Security did not immediately respond to requests for comment late Tuesday night.

Meanwhile, Mexico has begun to fly Haiti immigrants from the US border by bus, officials said Tuesday.

Mexico has helped at important moments. It stepped up patrols to prevent unaccompanied Central American children from reaching the Texas border in 2014, with tens of thousands of asylum seekers in Mexico in the U.S. Immigration Court in 2019. Allowed to wait for hearings and just last month began deporting Central American immigrants to Guatemala after the Byden administration flew them to southern Mexico.

Haitians have migrated from South America to the United States in large numbers for several years, and many have left the Caribbean after the 2010 catastrophic earthquake. Haiti is also struggling to recover from the assassination of President Jovenel Moise on July 7 and the magnitude 7.2 earthquake in mid-August.

Mexico’s Secretary of State Marcelo Evrad said he had spoken to US Secretary of State Antony Blinken on the situation in Haiti on Tuesday. Most Haitians were already in refugee status in Chile and Brazil and did not seek it in Mexico, according to Evlard.

“They want to allow them to freely pass through Mexico to the United States,” Evrad said.

Two Mexican federal officials who demanded anonymity because they were not allowed to speak publicly confirmed Mexico’s actions.

One official said Tuesday morning that three migrants left Acuña for Piedras Negras, about 55 miles (90 km) down the border, and boarded a plane to Villahermosa, the southern city of Tabasco. Said that.

Other officials said there was a flight on Monday from a city north of Monterey to a city south of Tapachula near the Guatemalan border. Tapachula is home to the largest immigration detention center in Latin America. The flight carried about 100 immigrants picked up around the Monterey bus stop, the hub of various routes to the US border.

A second official said the plan was to move all Haitians already seeking asylum in Mexico to tapachula.

Haiti migrants who are already in Mexico’s detention center and have not requested asylum will be first sent directly to Haiti when Mexico begins their flight, officials said.

Around Ciudad Real Madrid, Mexican authorities have stepped up efforts to keep migrants away from the border. There was an overnight detention in a raid with an immigrant agent at a hotel known to contain immigrants.

“Suddenly, they knocked on the door and shouted’immigrants’,’police’ as if they were looking for a drug trafficker,” said 37-year-old Venezuela, who is staying in one hotel with Haitians. Said Freddie Registre. Wife, Venezuela. The couple was surprised at midnight.

Authorities took four and others outside the hotel, he said. “They used our phone to investigate, took us to the Immigration Bureau and took a picture of us,” Registre said. They were held all night, but eventually their phone was returned and released. Authorities gave them two options: leaving Mexico or returning to tapachula.

They decided to leave the town on Tuesday afternoon. They planned to go to Tapachula, where they had already applied for asylum, and bought a bus ticket to Veracruz’s Gulf Province.

Others left without being told. A small group arrived at the Ciudad Real Madrid bus stop and bought tickets for Veracruz, Monterrey and Mexico City. The same bus route banned the sale of tickets for vehicles going north in Mexico and sold tickets going south without problems.

In Haiti, dozens of migrants, angry at being deported from the United States, rushed back to the plane that landed in Port-au-Prince on Tuesday afternoon, yelling at authorities. Security guards closed the plane’s doors as some exiles began throwing rocks and shoes on the plane. When the police arrived, some of them lost their belongings in a conflict. The group was disembarking from one of the three scheduled flights that day.

___

Verza reported from Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, and Spagat, San Diego. Associated Press writer Mark Stevenson of Mexico City, Felix Marquez of Ciudad Akunya, Mexico, Danikakoto of San Juan, Puerto Rico, Evens Sanon of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Michael Balsamo of Washington, Michael R. Sisak of Fenton, Michigan, New York Tammy Webber also contributed to this report.

___

Follow the Associated Press article at https://apnews.com/hub/migration

Many migrants from border camp staying in US – San Bernardino Sun Source link Many migrants from border camp staying in US – San Bernardino Sun

Related Articles

Back to top button