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Man gets life in prison for killing 21-year-old college student who mistook his car for Uber

A South Carolina man was sentenced to life imprisonment for the 2019 kidnapping and the murder of a 21-year-old college student who mistakenly boarded and carred Uber. The jury took just over an hour before Nathaniel Roland was found guilty. He killed Samantha Josephson, a student at the University of South Carolina, who disappeared from the Five Points Entertainment District of Columbia in March 2019. “Her dream was my dream and her death was my death. Close your eyes and feel what she endured with his hands. Victim’s mother, Marsi Josephson, said Tuesday. A student in Robinsville, New Jersey, thought it was Uber’s vehicle to bring her back to her apartment and boarded Roland’s car. Instead, Roland put a safe lock on her child. As she was wearing her, she realized she was trapped, the investigator said. She was never seen alive again. She was covered with about 120 stings. The body was later found in a forest about 65 miles from Colombia. Death shed a national spotlight on vehicle dispatch safety and brought about several changes, including a more prominent display of driver’s licenses. Roland maintained his innocence before being sentenced, but Patrol Judge Clifton Newman said all evidence showed Roland, apparently amazing to you. The battle was fought, leaving enough for the jury to see what you did, “Newman said after sentenced Roland to life. A person convicted of murder is not eligible for parole in South Carolina. Roland, wearing a mask, showed little emotion about how Josephson’s relatives reflected the pain of their loss and Josephson’s future – college seniors in law with a full scholarship. I was planning to go to graduate school – the prosecution spent about a week presenting vast amounts of evidence and called about three dozen witnesses. Experts have associated Josephson’s blood with the interior of Roland’s Chevrolet Impala and the two-bladed knife, a suspected murder weapon. Experts testified that her blood was also found in the trash can cleaning supplies behind the man’s girlfriend’s house at the time, as well as in Roland’s socks and bandanas. Other evidence included cell phone tracking data locating Roland on the night of the crime. .. One forensic scientist testified that the DNA collected from Roland’s fingernails matched the victim’s genetic material, and that DNA belonging to both the suspect and the victim was found in gloves in the trash can. Roland’s defense lawyer pointed out that Roland’s DNA is not guaranteed to exist. knife. His lawyer also claimed that Josephson appeared to be fighting her attacker, but Roland’s DNA was not found in her body and there was no visible evidence of such a fight after her arrest. did. The defense did not call witnesses, and Roland did not testify. Before taking a break from the defense’s proceedings, Roland’s lawyer demanded that the prosecutor’s case be revoked because he had filed a case in some circumstances. Newman rejected the request, saying there was an avalanche of direct and circumstantial evidence that the jury should consider. ___ Jeffrey Collins contributed to this report. ___ Liu is a member of the Associated Press / American Capitol News Initiative. Report for America is a non-profit national service program that places journalists in the local newsroom to report on unreported issues.

A South Carolina man was sentenced to life imprisonment for the 2019 kidnapping and the murder of a 21-year-old college student who mistaken his car for an Uber ride.

The jury took just over an hour to find Nathaniel Roland for murdering Samantha Josephson, a student at the University of South Carolina, who disappeared from the red-light district of Five Points in Columbia in March 2019.

“Her dream was my dream and her death was my death. Close your eyes and feel what she endured with his hands,” said the victim’s mother, Marsi Josephson. Said during the decision phase of Roland’s trial on Tuesday.

A student in Robinsville, NJ, thought it was Uber’s vehicle to bring her back to her apartment and boarded Roland’s car, the prosecutor said. Instead, she found herself trapped because Roland had a safe lock on her child, the investigator said. She was never seen alive again.

Her body, covered with approximately 120 puncture wounds, was later found in a forest about 65 miles from Colombia. Death shed a national spotlight on ride safety and led to several changes, including a more prominent display of driver’s licenses.

Roland remained innocent before being sentenced, but Circuit Court Judge Clifton Newman said all evidence pointed to Roland.

“She apparently fought an amazing fight against you, leaving enough for the jury to see what you did,” Newman said after sentenced Roland to life imprisonment. A person convicted of murder is not eligible for parole in South Carolina.

Roland wore a mask about how Josephson’s relatives looked back on the pain of their loss and how Josephson’s future (a college senior was planning to attend law school with a full scholarship) was shortened. He showed little emotion.

The prosecution took about a week to present a huge amount of evidence and called about three dozen witnesses. Experts have associated Josephson’s blood with the interior of Roland’s Chevrolet Impala and the two-bladed knife, a suspected murder weapon. Experts testified that her blood was also found in the trash can cleaning supplies behind the man’s girlfriend’s house at the time, as well as in Roland’s socks and bandanas.

Other evidence included cell phone tracking data locating Roland on the night of the crime. One forensic scientist testified that the DNA collected from Roland’s fingernails matched the victim’s genetic material, and that DNA belonging to both the suspect and the victim was found in gloves in the trash can.

Roland’s defense lawyer pointed out that scientists are not completely convinced that Roland’s DNA is on the knife. His lawyer also claimed that Josephson appeared to be fighting her attacker, but Roland’s DNA was not found in her body and there was no visible evidence of such a fight after her arrest. did. The defense did not call witnesses, and Roland did not testify.

Roland’s lawyer sought to revoke the prosecution’s case because the prosecutor filed a case-by-case lawsuit before taking a break from the defense’s case. There was no indication that Roland had actually killed Josephson or that he was driving a car when she disappeared.

Newman rejected the request, saying there was an avalanche of direct and circumstantial evidence that the jury should consider.

___

Jeffrey Collins contributed to this report.

___

Liu is a corps member of the Associated Press / Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a non-profit national service program that places journalists in the local newsroom to report on unreported issues.

Man gets life in prison for killing 21-year-old college student who mistook his car for Uber Source link Man gets life in prison for killing 21-year-old college student who mistook his car for Uber

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