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Lights come back on in Texas as water woes rise in the South

Related video above: Many of the millions of Texas people who had a power outage for several days now have regained it after a deadly winter explosion overwhelmed the grid after extreme weather hits Texas firefighters. The crisis was far from over in parts of the South, where many were unsafe. In Texas, about 325,000 homes and businesses continued to lose power on Thursday, down from about 3 million the day before. However, limited rolling blackouts are still possible, according to power company officials. The storm also caused more than 450,000 power outages from West Virginia to Louisiana. 100,000 people in Oregon endured a week-long power outage after a massive ice and snowstorm. Snow and ice moved to the Appalachians, northern Maryland, southern Pennsylvania, and then northeast after extreme weather killed at least 56 people. In the Houston area, a family member died of carbon monoxide while the car was idle. In their garage. Power companies from Minnesota to Texas used rolling blackouts to alleviate the tense power grid, and in a fire officials said the fireplace used by the authorities could be the cause. A woman and three grandchildren have died. However, according to the state grid manager, the Texas Electric Reliability Council, the remaining Texas power outages were primarily weather-related, with increased demand for electricity as people supplied electricity and regained heating. In that case, Texas’s outage could recur, said Dan Woodfin, senior council member. Texas Governor Greg Abbott warns that residents of the state are “not out of the woods,” temperatures throughout the state are still below freezing, and south-central Texas is experiencing winter storms and disruption of food supply chains. I’m under threat. Misery, the weather endangered the drinking water system. Authorities ordered 7 million people (a quarter of the population of the second largest state in the United States) to boil before drinking tap water, following record low temperatures that damaged infrastructure and pipes. I did. After the line froze, many people left the faucet and the water pressure dropped. The pipes drip to prevent them from freezing, said Toby Baker, Secretary-General of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. President Joe Biden called Abbott Thursday night, saying the federal government provided additional support to state and local agencies, and Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner said the population was probably the fourth largest in the United States. In cities, tap water needs to be boiled until Sunday or Monday. Federal Emergency Management Agency has sent generators to support water treatment plants, hospitals, and nursing homes in Texas, providing thousands of blankets and ready-to-eat meals. .. The Texas Restaurant Association was coordinating food donations to hospitals. Two of the Houston Methodist regional hospitals had no water supply and were treating patients, but canceled most non-urgent surgery and procedures on Thursday and perhaps Friday. As of Thursday afternoon, more than 1,000 Texas public water systems and 177 out of 254 counties in the state reported weather-related operational disruptions of 14 million, according to the Texas Environmental Quality Commission. Affected more than one person. Tennessee’s largest county has approximately 260,000 homes and businesses. Memphis was told to bring the water to a boil after the low temperature caused the water mains to burst and pumping station problems. And in Jackson, Mississippi, most of the cities of about 150,000 people said they had no water on Thursday night. The crew was pumping water to replenish the city’s tanks, but faced a shortage of chemicals to treat the water. “We are tackling the extreme challenge of getting more water through our water distribution system,” said Roomba. Bill lost water on Monday and relied on delivery from Bill’s manager, according to Linda Weathersby, an approximately 85 senior resident of Jackson’s apartment. Weathersby went out, collected and melted a bucket of ice, flushed the toilet and said, “I have a backache now.” Twelve people were rescued from the boat on Wednesday night after the dock collapsed on the Cumberland River in Tennessee due to snow and ice, according to the Nashville Fire Department. And a nine-year-old Tennessee boy was killed when his father was pulling a tube behind an ATV and hit a mailbox. In and around the city of Abilene in western Texas, officials said six people, including the age of 60, had died in the cold. -A man who died in a medical facility because an old man died in a bed in a frigid house and treatment was impossible due to lack of water pressure. A 69-year-old Arkansas man was found dead after falling into a frozen pond. While trying to rescue the calf. In Kentucky, a 77-year-old woman was found dead two days later, probably with hypothermia, in the absence of electricity and fever. Nearly 10 inches of snow fell in the city of Del Rio along the US-Mexico border before winter weather moved from Texas. On Thursday, it broke the daily record of a snowy city. — Bleeding reported from Little Rock, Arkansas. Dallas Associated Press journalist Terry Wallace. Juan Lozano, Houston; Rear Willingham, Jackson, Mississippi. Rebecca Reynolds in Louisville, Kentucky. Jay Reeves of Birmingham, Alabama. Kevin Magill of New Orleans; Darlene Superville, Washington. Contributed by Tammy Webber of Fenton, Michigan.

Related video above: Frozen weather hinders Texas firefighters

Many of the millions of Texas who lost power for days after a deadly winter explosion overwhelmed the power grid have now regained it, but the crisis is far from over in parts of the South. And many people lacked safe drinking water.

In Texas, about 325,000 homes and businesses continued to lose power on Thursday, down from about 3 million the day before, but utility officials said limited rolling blackouts were still possible.

The storm also left more than 450,000 people incapacitated from West Virginia to Louisiana, and 100,000 in Oregon survived a week-long power outage after a major ice and snow storm.

Snow and ice moved to the Appalachian Mountains, northern Maryland, and southern Pennsylvania, after which extreme weather blamed at least 56 deaths and increased casualties for those who died trying to keep warm, northeast. I moved to.

In the Houston area, a family died of carbon monoxide while a car was idling in the garage. The woman and her three grandchildren were killed in a fire that authorities said could have been caused by the fireplace they were using.

Power companies from Minnesota to Texas used rolling blackouts to mitigate the overloaded grid. However, according to the state grid manager, the Texas Electrical Reliability Council, the remaining Texas blackouts were primarily weather-related.

Dan Woodfin, senior director of systems operations at the council, said the Texas outage could recur if electricity demand increased as people supplied electricity and regained heating. ..

Texas Governor Greg Abbott warns that residents of the state are “not out of the woods,” and temperatures throughout the state are still below freezing, threatening winter storms and disruption of food supply chains in south-central Texas. Being exposed.

In addition to the state’s misery, the weather endangered the drinking water system. Authorities ordered 7 million people (a quarter of the population of the second largest state in the United States) to boil before drinking tap water, following record low temperatures that damaged infrastructure and pipes. I did.

Toby Baker, Secretary-General of the Texas Environmental Quality Commission, said water pressure dropped as many left the faucets dripping to prevent the pipes from freezing after the line froze. It was. Abbott urged residents to stop water in order to prevent pipe breakage and maintain municipal system pressure.

President Joe Biden called Abbott Thursday night and said the federal government had provided additional assistance to state and local agencies.

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner said residents would probably have to boil tap water in the fourth largest city in the United States until Sunday and Monday.

Federal emergency authorities have sent generators with thousands of blankets and ready-to-eat meals to support water treatment plants, hospitals and elderly homes in Texas, officials said. The Texas Restaurant Association was coordinating food donations to hospitals.

Two of the Houston Methodist regional hospitals had no running water and treated patients, but canceled most non-emergency surgeries and procedures on Thursday and perhaps Friday, spokeswoman Gale Smith said.

As of Thursday afternoon, more than 1,000 Texas public water systems and 177 out of 254 counties in the state reported weather-related operational disruptions to more than 14 million, according to the Texas Environmental Quality Commission. It had an impact.

Approximately 260,000 homes and businesses in Tennessee’s largest county, including Memphis, were told to boil water after low temperatures caused water main ruptures and pumping station problems.

Also, Mayor Chokwe Antal Rumba of Jackson, Mississippi, said Thursday night that most of the cities of about 150,000 people were waterless. The crew was pumping water to replenish the city’s tanks, but faced a shortage of chemicals to treat the water, she said.

“We are tackling the extreme challenge of getting more water through our water distribution system,” Lumumba said.

According to resident Linda Weathersby, about 85 seniors in Jackson’s apartment lost water on Monday and relied on deliveries from building managers.

Weathersby went out, collected and melted the ice in the bucket, washed the toilet and said, “I have a backache now.”

Twelve people were rescued from the boat Wednesday night after the dock collapsed on the Cumberland River in Tennessee with snow and ice as the storm headed east, according to the Nashville Fire Department. And a nine-year-old Tennessee boy was killed when his father was pulling a tube behind an ATV and hit a mailbox.

In and around the city of Abilene in western Texas, officials said six people had died in the cold. Among them are a 60-year-old man who was found dead in a bed in a frigid house and a man who died in a medical facility when there was a shortage. Water pressure made treatment impossible.

A 69-year-old man in Arkansas was found dead after falling into a frozen pond in an attempt to rescue a calf. In Kentucky, a 77-year-old woman was found dead two days later in the absence of electricity and fever due to a high likelihood of hypothermia.

Before the winter weather moved from Texas, the city of Del Rio along the US-Mexico border snowed nearly 10 inches on Thursday, surpassing the city’s daily snowfall record.

— —

Bleeding reported from Little Rock, Arkansas. Dallas Associated Press journalist Terry Wallace. Juan Lozano, Houston; Rear Willingham, Jackson, Mississippi. Rebecca Reynolds in Louisville, Kentucky. Jay Reeves of Birmingham, Alabama. Kevin Magill of New Orleans; Darlene Superville, Washington. Contributed by Tammy Webber of Fenton, Michigan.

Lights come back on in Texas as water woes rise in the South Source link Lights come back on in Texas as water woes rise in the South

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