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Light-activated ‘photoimmunotherapy’ could enhance brain cancer treatment

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A new light-enhanced technology developed at the Center for Cancer Research, London, could help identify and treat the type of advanced brain cancer, new research shows.

“Photoimmunotherapy” combines a special fluorescent dye with a cancer cell, which enhances the body’s immune system.

In a study in mice, a link was shown to improve vision cancer cells time surgery and, when activated by near-infrared light, to trigger an anti-tumor effect.

The drug, which was studied by an international team of researchers from the ICR and the University of Silesia, Poland, could ultimately help surgeons treat brain cancer like glioblastoma effectively, and physical response to cancer cells remaining after surgery.

Enlightenment brain cancer

Glioblastoma multiforme, also known as GBM, is one of the most common and serious types of brain cancer. New methods of improving surgery can help patients live longer.

Doctors often use a technique called Fluorescence Guided Surgery to treat diseases such as glioblastoma and other brain cancers, which use dye to help identify the tumor to be removed during surgery.

But because of these tumors that grow in areas of the brain such as motor skillsinvolved in the planning and management of voluntary movements, glioblastoma surgery can leave remnants of tumors that may be difficult to treat – and the disease may return in force later.

New study, published in the journal BMC MedicineBuild on Fluorescence Guided Surgery using a new technique called photoimmunotherapy (PIT).

This drug uses molecules called “affibodies” – small molecules manufactured in the laboratory to bind with a specific target with the same precision.

In this study, the researchers combined an “affibody” that was created to identify a protein called EGFR — which is altered in many cases of glioblastoma — with the gene called IR700, which is used for surgery.

The bright light on these compounds causes the dye to shine, exposing small areas of tumors left in the brain, while switching to near-infrared light results in anti-tumor action that kills tumors.

Giving new hope to brain cancer

The researchers tested this complex molecule, or “conjugate” – known scientifically as ZEGFR: 03115-IR700 — in mice with glioblastoma. They may see the chemical responsible for the cancer shining in the brain tumors during the surgical procedure, an hour after the procedure.

The near-infrared light on the tumor cells then activates the anti-tumor effect of the tumor, killing the cancer cells: scans of rats treated with the virus showed signs of bacterial death compared with non-infected rats take care of them.

Photoimmunotherapy also triggers an immune response in the body that can provide an immune system to target cancer cells, so treatment can help prevent glioblastoma cells from returning after surgery.

As well as being a possible future treatment for glioblastoma, the system used for ZEGFR: 03115-IR700 and can be adapted to other targets in other types of cancer, using newer antibodies.

Researchers at the ICR are also currently reviewing treatment in pediatric neuroblastoma.

Lead researcher Dr. Gabriela Kramer-Marek, Team Leader at Preclinical Surgery at ICR, says: “Brain cancer like glioblastoma can be difficult to treat and unfortunately, there are few treatment options for patients. is challenging because of the location of tumor tumors, tumor tumors, and new ways of seeing bacteria to be removed during surgery, and treating other cancer Cells that are left behind, can be of great benefit.

“Our research shows that a new drug for photoimmunotherapy using a combination of light signal, protein ‘affibody’ and pro-infrared light can detect and control the presence of glioblastoma cells in mice. In the future, we hope this method can be used to treat human glioblastoma and possibly other cancers as well. “

Professor Axel Behrens, Scientific Director of the British Institute of Cancer Research at the ICR and Imperial College London, and President of the Cancer Society at ICR, said: “Multidisciplinary work is critical to finding new solutions to our challenges face. face in cancer research, diagnosis and treatment — and this study is a great example of how researchers at our center work across traditional training boundaries. This research suggests a new way to identify and treat glioblastoma Cells in the brain using light to turn the immune system into a weak state, and which has an interesting advantage as a treatment for this type of inflammation. brain kumburi. ”


Treatment that ‘kills’ the cancer cells and limits growth can make the cancer cells easier to treat


Learn more:
Justyna Mączyńska et al, Induces anti-GBM immune response with EGFR-mediated photoimmunotherapy, BMC Medicine (2022). DOI: 10.1186 / s12916-021-02213-z

hintLight-activated photoimmunotherapy can improve brain cancer treatment (2022, June 20) Revised 20 June 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-06-light-activated-photoimmunotherapy-brain-cancer -treatment.html

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Light-activated ‘photoimmunotherapy’ could enhance brain cancer treatment Source link Light-activated ‘photoimmunotherapy’ could enhance brain cancer treatment

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