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Legally blind man outruns obstacles

This week, 22-year-old Alex France reaches some important milestones in life. He will graduate from Midland University in Nebraska with a degree from the Department of Youth and Family. He graduated from Midland as one of the school’s most successful distance runners. He intends to go to graduate school and become a consultant. “It’s healing for me. “It’s just relaxing,” France said, describing the 50 to 60 miles it runs each week. France holds the school record in the half marathon. And he won the All American status for finishing eighth in the marathon at the NAIA National Championships last year. These milestones are important because France is facing challenges that most young men could never have imagined. He began to lose his sight in high school. Legally blind, he sees a narrow field of granular, blurred images and uses assistive technology to learn and study. “I can not see the end of the sentence – or the word,” said Alex, which prevents him from reading traditionally. He used his faith and relied on friends, coaches, his sport and his family to build the life he always wanted. He hopes to run in the 2024 Paralympic Games in Paris, France. He also has more marathons and races on his list. His attitude is to push forward, as he does in racing. “Sometimes things happen in life. I would not let it change my life. Instead of asking why me, I ask “Why not me?” said France. Since high school, France has been training and competing with the help of runners-up, which poses some challenges. For beginners, the racing driver must be able to run as fast as France. The two are connected by holding a piece of rope 2 feet long. French runner-up Tim Grundmayer has traveled countless miles with his friend and assistant coach Phillip Duncan. “He is so kind and confident and he is an inspiration to others,” Duncan said, describing France. Duncan said he was giving his friend verbal cues about what was ahead along the way, removing him from traps with a pull of the rope. It is not without risk. France and its drivers have fallen into races. “You do not stop. You do not think about what just happened. “Keep going,” Duncan said. He said France was never justified. Alex said that the loss of his vision due to a genetic disease, retinitis pigmentosa, helped him become the person he is today. He says that going beyond his limits helps him to encourage others. “It was a privilege to be able to inspire people this way,” he said. Watch the video above for the full story.

This week, 22-year-old Alex France reaches some important milestones in life. He will graduate from Midland University in Nebraska with a degree from the Department of Youth and Family.

He graduated from Midland as one of the school’s most successful distance runners. He intends to go to graduate school and become a consultant.

“It’s healing for me. “It’s just relaxing,” France said, describing the 50 to 60 miles it runs each week.

France holds the school record in the half marathon. And he won the All American status for finishing eighth in the marathon at the NAIA National Championships last year.

These milestones are important because France is facing challenges that most young men could never have imagined. He began to lose his sight in high school. Legally blind, he sees a narrow field of grainy, blurred images and uses assistive technology to learn and study.

“I can not see the end of the sentence – or the word,” said Alex, which prevents him from reading traditionally.

He used his faith and relied on friends, coaches, his sport and his family to build the life he always wanted. He hopes to run in the 2024 Paralympic Games in Paris, France. He also has more marathons and races on his list.

His attitude is to push forward, as he does in racing.

“Sometimes things happen in life. I would not let it change my life. Instead of asking why me, I ask “Why not me?” said France.

Since high school, France has been training and competing with the help of runners-up, which poses some challenges. For beginners, the racing driver must be able to run as fast as France. The two are connected by holding a piece of rope 2 feet long. French driver Tim Grundmayer has traveled countless miles with his friend and assistant coach Phillip Duncan.

“He is so kind and confident and he is an inspiration to others,” Duncan said, describing France.

Duncan said he was giving his friend verbal cues about what was ahead along the way, removing him from traps with a pull of the rope. It is not without risk. France and its drivers have fallen into races.

“You do not stop. You do not think about what just happened. “Keep going,” Duncan said. He said France was never justified.

Alex said that the loss of his vision due to a genetic disease, retinitis pigmentosa, helped him become the person he is today. He says that going beyond his limits helps him to encourage others.

“It was a privilege to be able to inspire people this way,” he said.

Watch the video above for the full story.

Legally blind man outruns obstacles Source link Legally blind man outruns obstacles

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