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Lake Tahoe landscapes drawn using charcoal from NorCal wildfire

Many are still trying to recover nearly a year after the Caldor fire burned hundreds of homes in its wake and sparked the unprecedented evacuation of South Lake Tahoe. The devastating fire prompted an artist to use her work to heal and give back to her community. Shelley Zentner was forced to evacuate her home in Christmas Valley in late August last year. “It was already raining ash. We couldn’t go out already,” she said. Plus, he had already seen what happened at Grizzly Flats when the fire broke out. cabin that had been in her family for generations, going back to her great-grandfather.”Actually, I was sure we were going to lose it. I was positive,” Vaughn said. The fire was located on the 50 freeway and moved down toward Christmas Valley. But what happened next surprised Vaughan. “Right up there, unbelievable,” he said. The fire seemed to jump over their community, aided by the wind and the work of firefighters, leaving only a strip of green trees between the burn scar.” I mean, it’s hard not to use the word miracle when you see what happened,” Vaughn said. “We couldn’t believe it. It was so surreal,” Zendner said. When Zendner returned home, she realized how close some of the fires had come. he burned wood and I started stacking it in my hands like this,” he said, pointing with pieces of charcoal. “Like I do when I work.” The charcoal residue from the fire sparked an idea.” Once I started painting with it, I said, “Huh, this is how we heal. That’s how I’ve always healed,” Zendner said. She took the dead trees around her and gave them new life. “I feel like each piece seeds the next,” she said. .” Her collection includes a painting called “Choir.” It features trees, which Zendner’s neighbor said she grew up with.“Here, these are,” she said, pointing to what remained of the trees that had been cut down. “This cemetery here is these four trees.” Vaughn and her husband can now remember them through Zendner’s work. Dan and I knew we had to have this painting,” Vaughn said. They admire more than just Zentner’s talent. They admire how he uses it to give back. Zentner is donating all profits from the prints of “Choir” and copies of the catalogs in her collection to the Wildland Firefighter Foundation, which helps families of firefighters killed or injured on the job. She said she has raised more than $1,000 so far.”We were so deeply grateful and had no idea the hardships they endure while they put out fires like this, so I wanted to give back in some way,” Zentner said. Zentner’s work will be on display at the Halden Gallery at Lake Tahoe Community College, beginning with a reception Friday at 5 p.m. The solo exhibition will be on display until Friday, September 2.

Many are still trying to recover nearly a year after the Caldor fire burned hundreds of homes in its wake and triggered an unprecedented evacuation of south Lake Tahoe.

The devastating fire broke out an artist to use her work to help heal and give back to her community. Shelley Zentner was forced to evacuate her home in Christmas Valley in late August last year.

“It was already raining ash. We couldn’t go out already,” he said.

Plus, he had already seen what happened at Grizzly Flats when the fire broke out there.

“There was definitely part of me that was preparing for the worst,” Zentner said.

Her neighbor, Kathy Vaughan, felt the same way after evacuating the cabin that had been in her family for generations, going back to her great-grandfather.

“Actually, I was sure we were going to lose it. I was positive,” Vaughn said.

The fire was located above the 50 freeway and moved down toward Christmas Valley. But what happened next surprised Vaughn.

“Right up there, incredible,” he said.

The fire appeared to have jumped over their community, aided by the wind and the work of firefighters, leaving only a strip of green trees between the burn scar.

“I mean, it’s hard not to use the word miracle when you see what happened,” Vaughn said.

“We couldn’t believe it. It was so surreal,” Zentner said.

When Zendner returned home, she examined how close some of the fires had come.

“I just started leafing through the burnt wood and started stacking it in my hands like this,” he said, pointing at pieces of charcoal. “Like I do when I work.”

The charcoal remains from the fire sparked an idea.

“Once I started designing with it, I was like, ‘Huh, this is how we heal. That’s how I’ve always healed,” Zentner said.

She took the dead trees around her and gave them new life.

“I feel like each piece seeds the next,” he said.

Eventually, it led to an entire collection of art he called, “Call and Response.”

“Some of the works are hard to look at. I know that, but I wanted to include light in each piece so that there is always an element of hope.”

Her collection includes a painting called “Chorus”. It features trees, which Zentner’s neighbor said she grew up with.

“Here, these are them,” he said, pointing to what was left of the trees that had been cut down. “This here cemetery is these four trees.”

Vaughn and her husband can now be remembered through Zentner’s work.

“Dan and I knew we had to have this painting,” Vaughn said.

They admire more than Zentner’s talent. They admire how he uses it to give back.

Zentner is donating all profits from prints of “Chorus” and from copies of the catalogs of her collection to the Wildland Firefighter Foundation, which helps families of firefighters killed or injured on the job.

He said he has raised more than $1,000 so far.

“We were so deeply grateful and had no idea the hardships they suffer while putting out fires like this, so I wanted to give back in some way,” Zentner said.

Zentner’s work will be presented at Halden Gallery at Lake Tahoe Community College, beginning with a reception on Friday at 5 p.m. The solo exhibition will be on display until Friday, September 2.

Lake Tahoe landscapes drawn using charcoal from NorCal wildfire Source link Lake Tahoe landscapes drawn using charcoal from NorCal wildfire

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