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Judge denies abortion clinic’s request to block Mississippi trigger law

Video above: Mississipi AG confirms abortion ban Tuesday in three South American states, Lawyers debated abortion law on Tuesday, in response to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling give states the power to limit or ban contraception. the state’s only abortion clinic to block state law for a period of time that would prevent most abortions. If there are no further developments in the hospital case, the law will take effect on Thursday. Lawmakers passed a violent lawsuit before the U.S. Supreme Court recently overturned a 1973 ruling that allowed abortions across the country. The hospital, Jackson Women’s Health Association, has sought a temporary restraining order that would allow it to remain open, while the case continues in court. The case is being monitored as part of a nationwide crackdown since the Supreme Court ruled. Conservative states have reverted to banning or limiting abortion while some seek to assert their right to abortion, while some women are trying to find a medical system on legal change. Florida’s new 15-week abortion ban was blocked, but it quickly returned Tuesday after an appeal by the state attorney general in a lawsuit challenging the law. Judge John C. Cooper ordered the law to be suspended for a time after maternity caregivers complained that the state constitution allows for the system. The state immediately appealed his order, repealing the law directly. Florida law prohibits abortion after 15 weeks, unless the procedure is necessary to save the life of a pregnant woman, prevent serious injury or if the fetus is severe damage. It does not allow the exclusion of pregnant women through rape, incest or human trafficking. Violators can face up to five years in prison. Physicians and other medical professionals may lose their licenses and face a $ 10,000 administrative fine for each violation. The bill, which went into effect Friday, was approved by the GOP House of Representatives and signed into law by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis this summer. In Louisiana, the state attorney general has asked the state Supreme Court to allow the enforcement of abortion laws in most pregnancies. . Louisiana’s abortion laws include so-called provisions designed to take effect immediately if the U.S. Supreme Court changes its abortion rights. But a judge in New Orleans last week barred enforcement of the law until a lawsuit filed by an abortion clinic in northern Louisiana and others was heard. probably on when the law came into force and the private doctors. ban. Entering the attorney general’s office on Tuesday said the law enforcement order should be repealed.Mississippi is one of several states that has a “chaotic” law in the Supreme Court that overturned Roe v. Wade. The law was enacted in 2007 and has never been challenged in court. He said abortion was only permissible if the life of a pregnant woman was in danger or if another pregnancy occurred as a result of rape by security personnel. It is not exclusive to pregnant women who cause miscarriage. The hospital’s lawsuit refers to a 1998 Mississippi Supreme Court ruling that said the state constitution has the right to privacy which “includes the right to vote or to have an abortion or not.” The attorney general’s office argued that the 1998 ruling stemmed from U.S. Supreme Court decisions in 1973 and 1992 that established or protected abortion rights but were repealed on June 24. The decision was made because of the Federal Constitution. “They never said she would resign if Roe ever abandoned him,” McDuff said in court Tuesday. “Over the past two weeks, the legal situation has changed dramatically,” state attorney Scott Stewart said Tuesday. The case was filed three days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in a case that originated in Mississippi. The hospital continued to see patients, but owner Diane Derzis said it would close if the abortion ban was almost in effect. Judge Debbra K. Halford rejected the hospital’s request to stop the new state law from taking effect on Tuesday. . Outside the court. On Tuesday in the Mississippi capital, several women held up signs of abortion support while two men used a microphone to tell supporters of abortion rights that God would punish them. never. “You are bloody. Bloody, dirty before God,” said one of the anti-abortion protesters, Allen Siders. “Consider your ways today, you sinners. Consider your ways today, shame on you.” in front of Siders to make fun of him, and many women laughed.

Video above: Mississippi AG confirms abortion law

Lawyers debated the abortion law on Tuesday in three South American states in response to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that gave states the power to limit or ban contraception.

In Mississippi, a judge rejected a request by the state’s only abortion clinic to block state law for a while to prevent more abortions. With no further progress in the hospital case, the law will take effect on Thursday.

Lawmakers passed a controversial law before the U.S. Supreme Court recently overturned a 1973 ruling that allowed abortions across the country. The hospital, Jackson Women’s Health Association, has sought a temporary restraining order that would allow it to remain open, while the case is pending in court.

The case is being monitored as part of a nationwide crackdown since the Supreme Court ruled. Conservative states have reverted to banning or limiting abortion while some seek to assert their right to abortion, while some women are trying to find a medical system on legal change.

Florida’s new 15-week abortion ban was blocked but was quickly repealed on Tuesday after an appeal by the state attorney general in a lawsuit challenging the measure. Judge John C. Cooper ordered the law to be suspended for a time after maternity caregivers complained that the state constitution allows for the system. The state immediately appealed his order, reinstating the direct employment law.

Florida law prohibits abortion after 15 weeks, unless the procedure is necessary to save the life of the pregnant woman, prevent serious injury or if the fetus is severely damaged. It does not allow the exclusion of pregnant women through rape, incest or human trafficking.

Offenders could face up to five years in prison. Physicians and other medical professionals may lose their licenses and face a $ 10,000 administrative fine for each violation. The bill, which went into effect on Friday, was approved by the GOP congress and approved by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis this summer.

In Louisiana, the state attorney general asked the state Supreme Court to authorize the enforcement of the abortion ban. Louisiana’s abortion laws include so-called provisions designed to take effect immediately if the U.S. Supreme Court changes its abortion rights. But a judge in New Orleans last week blocked enforcement of the law until a lawsuit was filed by an abortion clinic in northern Louisiana and others.

Louisiana law says the law is uncertain about when the law will take effect and the medical exception to the law. The attorney general’s office filed a lawsuit on Tuesday, saying the ban should be overturned.

Mississippi was one of several states that had a “chaos” law on the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade. The law was enacted in 2007 and has never been challenged in court. He said abortion was only permissible if the life of a pregnant woman was in danger or if another pregnancy occurred as a result of rape by security personnel. It is not exclusive to pregnant women resulting in offspring.

The hospital case cited a Mississippi Supreme Court ruling in 1998 that said the state constitution required privacy rights including the right to choose or have an abortion.

The attorney general’s office argued that the 1998 ruling originated from a U.S. Supreme Court ruling in 1973 and 1992 that established or protected abortion rights but was repealed on June 24. Their decision was made because of the federal constitution.

“They never said she would step down if Roe was ever ignored,” McDuff said in court Tuesday.

The state attorney general’s office says the Mississippi constitution does not recognize abortion rights and the state has long restricted the practice.

“Over the past two weeks, the nature of the law has changed dramatically,” state attorney Scott Stewart argued Tuesday in court.

The lawsuit was filed three days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in a case that originated in Mississippi. The hospital continued to see patients, but owner Diane Derzis said it would close if almost all abortions stopped working.

Judge Debbra K. Halford dismissed the hospital’s request to prevent the new state law from taking effect on Tuesday.

Outside the court on Tuesday in the Mississippi capital, several women held up signs of abortion support while two men used a microphone to tell abortion supporters that God would punish them forever. .

“You are bloody. Bloody, dirty before God, “said one of the anti-abortion protesters, Allen Siders.”

An abortion advocate performed an inappropriate role in front of Siders to make fun of him, and many women laughed.

Judge denies abortion clinic’s request to block Mississippi trigger law Source link Judge denies abortion clinic’s request to block Mississippi trigger law

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