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Job scams are on the rise. Watch out for these red flags

The labor market has given us low unemployment, higher wages – and a rise in the number of fraudulent job seekers reports. “Obviously we see fraud at work,” said Rhonda Perkins, a lawyer and chief of staff. of the business unit of the Federal Trade Commission. In 2021, the commission received more than double the number of fraud reports than in 2020, Perkins said. And in the first quarter of this year, more than 16,000 complaints were received. Job fraud is temporary and the tactics used by fraudsters may vary. Some will try to gain access to your personal information, while others may seek payment from you or hire you for a legal activity, such as recovering luxury items purchased using credit cards I stole. Video above: Beware of scams at work if you are. Looking for a job So if you are looking for a job, here are some red flags and experts say look for opportunities to review opportunities: Job positions are bright, but provide details In the job market, employers they are trying to do that. exit. But if sending a job is about making quick money or other big promises – keep it simple. “, ‘Or’ laptop for free ‘and it has very little technical requirements … and many limitations and photos to share your attention, it just doesn’t come with technology, “said Sara Sutton, CEO and co-founder of FlexJobs.If you are not sure about the authenticity of the message, check to see if you can get the opening printed directly on the company’s website. You have questions, but they have no answers Getting a call from an employer is interesting, but make sure they talk. they are the ones who say they are – especially if it is for a job you are not applying for. “Pay attention to the questions they ask you,” Sutton said. “If an employer hires you quickly without verifying your work experience or looking for references and moving very fast, fast – those are also red flags.” about status, job prospects and experience requirements. “Obviously they will run away from you when you start asking more questions,” said Sinem Buber, an economist at ZipRecruiter. “If they start giving you the wrong answers or not answering your questions properly, you know that this is not a real job.” Sutton added that scammers could use company names and scams and suggested they check the email of a legitimate employee. For example, if the domain “company-inc.com” is on “company.com,” it is recommended to look online to see what the company is using. They are looking for personal information Applications The application includes questions such as your name, address, contact information and qualifications, but should not go further than that. “Buber before giving any personal information, Perkins suggested doing some search. search online. “Check the name of the company, the person who claims to be carrying you, the word ‘scam,’ ‘review,’ or ‘complaint’ … and do not agree to a review on the company’s website. These could be false. ” training or software or equipment, that should be a big red flag. ” work – only scammers will ask you to do that, “Perkins said. computer and then ask you to pay past due payments.s money through mobile money transfer service, cryptocurrency or free cards.These types of remittances are difficult for security officers to identify and people to recover their money, Perkins it appears. so when you put a check and it looks like it has been deleted it does not mean it is a good check, “Perkins said. “The bank will find out later that it has a bad check.”

The booming labor market has given us lower unemployment, higher wages – and more violence in the number of fraudulent job seekers reports..

“Obviously we’re seeing fraud,” said Rhonda Perkins, a lawyer and chief of staff for the Commerce Department of the Federal Trade Commission. In 2021, the commission received more than double the number of fraud reports than in 2020, Perkins said. And in the first quarter of this year, more than 16,000 complaints were received.

Job fraud is temporary and the tactics used by fraudsters may vary. Some will try to gain access to your personal information, while others may seek payment from you or hire you for a legal activity., such as recycling luxury items purchased using stolen credit cards.

Video above: Beware of scams when you are looking for a job

So if you are looking for a job, here are some red flags experts say look for opportunities to review opportunities:

The office is flashing, but it provides little details

In the job market, employers are trying to get out. But if sending work is all about making quick bucks or other big promises – keep being cautious.

“If a job ad uses good-to-be-used terms like: ‘fast money,’ or ‘unlimited profit,’ or ‘free laptop’ and has fewer technical requirements … Sara Sutton, CEO and founder of FlexJobs said.

If you are not sure of the authenticity of the message, check to see if you can find the openings published directly on the company website.

You have questions, but they have no answers

Getting a call from an employer is fun, but make sure they know who they are – especially if the job you are not applying for.

“Pay attention to the questions they ask you,” Sutton said. “If an employer hires you quickly without verifying your work experience or looking for references and it moves so fast, fast – those are also red flags.”

If the job description is too interesting, be sure to look for more details about the position, job prospects and qualifications.

“Of course they will run away from you when you start asking more questions, Says Sinem Buber, an economist at ZipRecruiter. “If they start giving you the wrong answers or not answering your questions properly, you know this is not a real job.”

Sutton added that scammers can use company names and scams and are advised to check the employer’s email is legal. For example, if the domain “company-inc.com” is on “company.com,” it is recommended to look online to see what the company is using.

They are looking for personal information

The job application usually includes questions such as your name, address, contact information and job qualifications, but should not go further than that.

“If they ask you to provide personal information in advance during the interview process, such as your Security code to check background information … no legitimate company will ask for your background information or Security Code during the interview process. This happens after you are. hire, “Buber said.

Before disclosing any personal information, Perkins recommends doing some research online. “Check the name of the company, the person who claims to be carrying you, with the word ‘scam,’ ‘review,’ or ‘koke’ … and do not approve of reviews on the company’s website. These can be false. “

They want to pay

The discussion you should have with a potential employer about money should be about compensation. If they ask you to pay any fees for things like special services, training or software or equipment, this should be a big red flag.

“Don’t pay for a job, don’t pay for a job – only crooks will ask you to do it,” Perkins said.

There is also a fake registration scam that can lead a fake company to send you large checks to buy something like computer hardware and then ask you to pay past fees through a mobile transfer service, cryptocurrency or cards. grant.

These types of remittances are difficult for law enforcement to detect and people to recover their money, Perkins explained.

“Under the law, banks are required to provide funds as a matter of urgency, so if you put a check and it seems to be withdrawn it does not mean it is good,” Perkins said. “The bank will find out later that it has a bad check.”

Job scams are on the rise. Watch out for these red flags Source link Job scams are on the rise. Watch out for these red flags

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