Local

JHU experts discuss gun violence prevention, effective laws

Experts from Johns Hopkins University say the high number of shootings in Uvalde, Texas, Buffalo and Tulsa, Oklahoma, indicates that there is a gun crisis in the country. Experts Johns Hopkins have come together to talk about improved gun laws, how to protect children in schools and to study how people want gun laws to look like. Odis Johnson, executive director of the Johns Hopkins Institute of Public Health, said that in just one year police had responded to shootings at 34 schools in the United States. “The best way to ensure schools is to ensure that students feel valued, valued, have staff who will address them with appropriate strategies and ensure that they are connected and reassured. , and this will enable students to engage in societal attitudes toward a higher society, “said Johnson.Daniel Webster, co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Violence, “Federal and state laws can ease gun trafficking. Once states extend the investigation into the private sector, gun trafficking is reduced,” said Webster.Cassandra Crifasi, a researcher. at the Center for the Resolution of Gun Violence, said the committee would refocus on the minimum. years after two 18-year-olds used automatic rifles to shoot at people in schools. “Two-thirds of Americans – including more than half of gun owners and Republicans – think “People under the age of 21 should not be able to get a gun. There is also great support for anyone who wants to buy a self-propelled gun to be at least 21,” Crifasi said. just turned 18 to buy an automatic rifle and 16 rounds of ammunition is a threat to the health of our people, our children and our democracy. This is the time to do everything we can because we love our children. We need to protect our democracy and we need to do something about it, “Horwitz said. mental health in schools.Watch the video above for the full story.

Experts from Johns Hopkins University say the high number of shootings in Uvalde, Texas, Buffalo and Tulsa, Oklahoma, indicates that there is a gun crisis in the country.

Johns Hopkins experts have come together to talk about improved gun laws, how to protect children in schools and to study how people want gun laws to look like.

Odis Johnson, executive director of the Johns Hopkins Institute of Public Health, says this year alone police have responded to the shooting of 34 schools in the United States.

“The best way to ensure schools is to ensure that students feel valued, valued, have staff who will address them with appropriate strategies and ensure that they are connected and reassured. , and this will enable students to engage in social attitudes toward society. higher self-discipline, “Johnson said.

Daniel Webster, executive director of the Johns Hopkins Center for the Study of Gun Violence, says laws that make it easier to carry concealed firearms outside the home can increase violence.

“It is well known that weaknesses in federal and state law can facilitate gun trafficking. Once states extend the historical investigation to the private sector, gun trafficking is reduced,” Webster said.

Cassandra Crifasi, a researcher at the Center for the Prevention of Violence Against Women, said the committee refocused on the youngest age after two 18-year-olds used automatic rifles to shoot in schools.

“Two-thirds of Americans – including more than half of gun owners and Republicans – think people under the age of 21 should not be able to own a gun. There is also great support for anyone who wants to buy one. automatic rifle to sit. at least 21, “Crifasi said.

Josh Horwitz, of the Center for the Study of Gun Violence, says something needs to be done to protect children.

“The power of an 18-year-old to buy an automatic rifle with 16 rounds of ammunition is a threat to the health of our people, our children and our democracy. This is the time to do everything we can because we want to. Our children. We need to protect our democracy and we need to do something, ”Horwitz said.

The committee also stressed that there is a need for people to ensure that they have access to safe firearms, and that there is intervention in community abuse and mental health practices in schools.

Watch the video above for the full story.

JHU experts discuss gun violence prevention, effective laws Source link JHU experts discuss gun violence prevention, effective laws

Related Articles

Back to top button