Local

How to Treat Sunburn Blisters Safely, According to Dermatologists

A sunburn feels awful enough on its own, but if it gets really bad, your skin can also develop uncomfortable blisters (and you’ll be browsing our list of the best home remedies for sunburn). According to the American Academy of Dermatology, blistered skin is a sign of a second-degree burn, which is no joke. So you want to treat the area with extra care. “Blisters develop when the skin becomes so inflamed that the connections between skin cells are disrupted,” explained Joshua Zeichner, MD, director of aesthetics and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. “This leads to tearing of the skin, which eventually fills with serous fluid.” Those blisters don’t exactly look or feel great, especially since you’re already dealing with red, sore, swollen, and even peeling skin. Plus, it’s a sign that significant damage has been done: Just one blistering sunburn as a child or teenager more than doubles your chances of developing melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, later in life, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. treat your skin right (and protect it from future damage), we asked dermatologists to share their pro tips on how to treat a sun blister safely. However, there are a few steps you can take to give your skin some extra love:1. Drink plenty of water When you have a sunburn, your body transfers water from other areas to your skin, according to the AAD. Taking plenty of H2O can advance the process and will prevent dehydration.2. Cover the Blister If you only have a few blisters, Zeichner recommends covering them with a bandage to avoid accidentally injuring them. “They will all heal on their own in the vast majority of cases,” he says. It’s also a good idea to cover the area when you go out. Wear tight-fitting fabrics (such as soft cotton) for maximum protection and comfort, says AAD.3. Keep it cold Applying ice (make sure it’s wrapped in something!) to the area can help reduce swelling and pain, says Gary Goldenberg, MD, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. . Cold, wet compresses will provide similar relief.4. Moisturize like crazy Keeping your blister covered is vital, but you still need to treat the surrounding burn with care. Avoid hot showers (choose cool baths if you can) and use gentle, moisturizing soaps or aloe vera gel while the skin is slightly damp.5. Apply a steroid cream A topical steroid cream such as 1% hydrocortisone can help relieve any itching and keep inflammation under control, Goldenberg said. 6. Take OTC pain relievers if you need them This won’t necessarily speed up the healing process of the blisters, but taking aspirin or ibuprofen can help reduce swelling, redness, and pain if you’re extremely uncomfortable, says the AAD.7. Watch it carefully if it pops A blister shouldn’t pop from the sun (more on that later), but if one does break open, the Mayo Clinic recommends cleaning the area very carefully with mild soap and water. Apply antibiotic ointment and cover the exposed skin with non-stick gauze or a bandage. Monitor it closely: If a rash develops or starts to feel worse, see your doctor as soon as possible. Popping Sunburn Blisters While it’s tempting to pop those fluid-filled pockets, it’s definitely not the best idea. Blisters are there to help your skin heal and protect you from infection, so popping them could put both at risk. “Think of the top of the hive as the normal cord, protecting the raw skin underneath,” Zeichner said. That means you should “absolutely” not pop a bubble from the sun, even if you really, really want to, Goldenberg urges. “Blisters should be allowed to drain and pop on their own,” he says. How long do sunburn blisters last? Goldenberg says it can take up to two weeks for blisters to go away, but that healing time can be worsened by fussing and popping, so be sure to treat yours with kindness and care, along with the advice provided above.How to Prevent a Sunburn Blister Once the sunburn blister has healed, your skin may be even more vulnerable to UV damage. The only way to truly prevent a sunburn (and the painful blisters that can come with one) is to apply sunscreen regularly: Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. Apply at least 1 ounce (a glass-sized amount) of sunscreen to your entire body. Lotions, compared to sticks or sprays, rub off more easily. Reapply sunscreen every two hours or after swimming or sweating. It also helps to wear UPF sun-protective clothing and get some shade when you can. Enjoying summer is great, but staying healthy is even better.

A sunburn feels awful enough on its own, but if it gets really bad, your skin can also develop uncomfortable blisters (and you’ll be browsing our list of the best home remedies for sunburn).

According to American Academy of Dermatology, blistered skin is an indication of a second degree burn, which is no joke. So you want to treat the area with extra care.

“Blisters develop when the skin becomes so inflamed that the connections between skin cells are disrupted,” explained Joshua Zeichner, MD, director of aesthetics and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. “This leads to tearing of the skin, which eventually fills with serous fluid.”

Those blisters don’t exactly look or feel great, especially since you’re already dealing with red, sore, swollen, and even peeling skin. Plus, they’re a sign that significant damage has been done: Just one blistering sunburn as a child or teenager more than doubles your chances of developing melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, later in life, per Skin Cancer Foundation.

To properly treat your skin (and protect it from future damage), we asked dermatologists to share their pro tips on how to safely treat a sun blister.

Treatment of blisters from sunburn

Treating sunburn blisters is mostly about being patient and waiting for them to heal. However, there are a few steps you can take to give your skin some extra love:

1. Drink lots of water

When you have a sunburn, your body transfers water from other areas to your skin, according to the AAD. Getting plenty of H2O can advance the process and will prevent dehydration.

2. Cover the hive upwards

If you only have a few blisters, Zeichner recommends covering them with a bandage to avoid accidentally injuring them. “They will all heal on their own in the vast majority of cases,” he says. It’s also a good idea to cover the area when you go out. Wear tight-fitting fabrics (such as soft cotton) for maximum protection and comfort, says the AAD.

3. Keep it cold

Applying ice (make sure it’s wrapped in something!) to the area can help reduce swelling and pain, says Gary Goldenberg, MD, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. Cold, wet compresses will provide similar relief.

4. Moisturize like crazy

Keeping your blister covered is vital, but you still need to treat the surrounding burn with care. Avoid hot showers (opt for cool baths if you can) and use gentle, moisturizing soaps or aloe vera gel while the skin is slightly damp.

5. Apply a steroid cream

A topical steroid cream such as 1% hydrocortisone can help relieve any itching and keep inflammation under control, Goldenberg said.

6. Take OTC pain relievers if needed

This won’t necessarily speed up the blisters’ healing process, but taking aspirin or ibuprofen can help reduce swelling, redness, and pain if you’re extremely uncomfortable, says the AAD.

7. Watch it carefully if it pops

You shouldn’t pop a solar bubble (more on that later), however, if it pops, the Mayo Clinic recommends very careful cleaning of the area with mild soap and water. Apply antibiotic ointment and cover the exposed skin with non-stick gauze or a bandage. Monitor it closely: If a rash develops or starts to feel worse, see your doctor as soon as possible.

Blisters from sunburn

While it’s tempting to pop these fluid-filled pockets, it’s definitely not the best idea. Blisters are there to help your skin heal and protect you from infection, so popping them could put both at risk.

“Think of the top of the hive as the normal cord, protecting the raw skin underneath,” Zeichner said.

That means you “absolutely” shouldn’t pop a solar bubble, even if you really, really want to, Goldenberg urges. “Blisters should be allowed to drain and pop on their own,” he says.

How long do sunburn blisters last?

Goldenberg says it can take up to two weeks for blisters to go away, but that healing time can be worsened by agitation and popping, so be sure to treat yours with kindness and care, along with the advice provided above.

How to prevent a sunburn

Once the sunburn blister has healed, your skin may be even more vulnerable to UV damage. The only way to truly prevent a sunburn (and the painful blisters that can appear) is to apply sunscreen regularly:

  • Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.
  • Apply at least 1 ounce (a glass-sized amount) of sunscreen to your entire body. Lotions, compared to sticks or sprays, are easier to rub in liberally.
  • Reapply sunscreen every two hours or after swimming or sweating.

It also helps to wear UPF sun-protective clothing and get some shade when you can. Enjoying summer is great, but staying healthy is even better.

How to Treat Sunburn Blisters Safely, According to Dermatologists Source link How to Treat Sunburn Blisters Safely, According to Dermatologists

Related Articles

Back to top button