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How the Dorothea Puente case unfolded in Sacramento

A whole new group of people are learning about Dorothea Puente, the notorious Sacramento serial killer, after she recently appeared in the first episode of the popular Netflix show “Worst Roommate Ever.” Puente maintained a boarding house on F Street in downtown Sacramento. in the 1980s and was convicted of drugs, murder and burying her tenants in the backyard. After their death, Puente would receive their Social Security benefits. In November 1988, police found seven bodies buried in her yard. Officers searched for Puente after the bodies were found and located in Los Angeles where she was arrested. KCRA 3 chartered a plane to cover Dorothea Puente and our jet brought it back to Sacramento On November 18, 1988, KCRA 3 chartered a jet with reporter Mike Boyd in Los Angeles. On the way back, authorities used the KCRA 3 chartered aircraft to transport Puente back to Sacramento, where Boyd was able to give an exclusive interview to the serial killer. Boyd had the opportunity to do a brief interview with Puente, if he did not ask questions about the case. MORE KCRA highlights on camera: On a plane with a serial killer Puente spoke briefly about her time working for the Mexican Chamber of Commerce, saying she was “once a very good man”. He was later found guilty of nine counts of murder and sentenced to life in prison. How did Dorothea Puente die? Puente died while in jail on March 27, 2011. The California Department of Corrections said Puente, 82, died of natural causes at a specialist nursing home. MORE Sacramento’s notorious serial killer diesWhat happened at Dorothea Puente’s home? That same year, the Victorian Puente bungalow that used to commit its crimes was sold to a Sacramento couple at a public auction for $ 215,000. The couple, Barbara Holmes and Tom Williams, renovated the property – knowing full well the history behind its past. MORE “Barbara wanted to completely change the picture. And that would never happen. So we decided to play with him,” Williams told KCRA 3 at the time. And play with what he did. A shower curtain in the house was decorated with a crime film and a plaque that is still outside the house reads: “Violators will be drugged and buried in the yard.” The couple also added a mannequin that was originally placed in the backyard and has since been moved to the front of the house. This mannequin holds a shovel while wearing a gray wig and coat – similar to the one Puente famously wore when she was arrested. The couple then went on a one-day home tour – a tour that KCRA 3 made sure not to miss. | MORE Photos: Dorothea Puente home tour Everything was part of a tour of the Sacramento Old Town Association home. Along with the plaque and mannequin, the couple also showed off their new appliances, removing interior walls that seemed to open the house and decorating the outside like bottles marked with a skull, cross and the word “poizin”. in the gallery below to take a look inside the house when it was open to the public in 2013. But the reporters and curious visitors of KCRA 3 were not the only ones on that sunny September day who wanted to take a look inside the beautiful Victorian house with a sick backstory. John Cabrera – the chief detective in the Puente case when it all came to light – also made a stop at the house he had not seen in at least 25 years. MORE Retired detective returning home of convicted serial killer Dorothea PuenteCabrera told KCRA 3 at the time that he was waiting for the day but only wanted to return when the house was rebuilt, when he was happy, “he said. Cabrera: “I like this house. It’s happy.” Cabrera, one of the few people who could accurately describe the horror found in the house, went through KCRA 3 through it, describing what was found in the research. Cabrera during the 2013 tour, as she stood in a bedroom. Pointing to a narrow staircase, Cabrera said, “The stairs, that’s how she took her victims out, right here.”

A whole new group of people is learning about Dorothea Puente, the infamous Sacramento serial killerafter recently appearing on the first episode of Netflix’s popular show “Worst Roommate Ever”.

Puente ran a boarding house on F Street in central Sacramento in the 1980s and was convicted of drugs, murder and burying her tenants in the backyard. After their death, Puente would receive Social Security benefits.

In November 1988, police found seven bodies buried in her yard. Police searched for Puente after finding the bodies and located her in Los Angeles where she was arrested.

KCRA 3 chartered a plane to cover Dorothea Puente and our jet brought it back to Sacramento

On November 18, 1988, KCRA 3 chartered a jet with reporter Mike Boyd in Los Angeles. On the way back, authorities used the KCRA 3 chartered aircraft to transport Puente back to Sacramento, where Boyd was able to get a Exclusive interview with the serial killer.

Boyd was allowed to do a brief interview with Puente, as long as he did not ask questions about the case.

| MORE KCRA highlights on camera: On a plane with a serial killer

Puente spoke briefly about her time working for the Mexican Chamber of Commerce, saying “she was once a very good man.”

He was later found guilty of nine counts of murder and sentenced to life in prison.

How did Dorothea Puente die?

Puente died while in prison on March 27, 2011. The California Department of Corrections said Puente, 82, died of natural causes at a specialist hospital.

| MORE Sacramento’s notorious serial killer dies

What happened at Dorothea Puente’s house?

That same year, the Victorian Puente bungalow she used to commit her crimes was sold to a Sacramento couple at a public auction for $ 215,000.

The couple, Barbara Holmes and Tom Williams, renovated the property – knowing full well the history behind its past.

| MORE Former Sacramento serial killer home renovated, ready to visit

“Barbara wanted to change the picture completely. And that would never happen. So we decided to play with it,” Williams told KCRA 3 at the time.

And they played with that they did. A shower curtain in the house was decorated with a crime film and a plaque that is still outside the house reads: “Violators will be drugged and buried in the yard.”

The couple also added a mannequin that was originally placed in the backyard and has since been moved to the front of the house. This mannequin holds a shovel while wearing a gray wig and coat – similar to the one Puente famously wore when she was arrested.

The couple then went on a one-day home tour – a tour that KCRA 3 made sure not to miss.

| MORE Photos: Dorothea Puente home tour

It was all part of the tour of the Sacramento Old Town Association. Along with the plaque and mannequin, the couple also showed off their new appliances, removing interior walls that seemed to open the house and decorating the outside like bottles with a skull, cross and the word “pizzen”.

Scroll to the collection below to take a look inside the house when it was open to the public in 2013.

But reporters and curious visitors to KCRA 3 were not the only ones on that sunny September day who wanted to take a look at the beautiful Victorian house with a sick story.

John Cabrera – the chief detective in the Puente case when it all came to light – also made a stop at the house he had not seen in at least 25 years.

| MORE Retired detective returns to the home of convicted serial killer Dorothea Puente

Cabrera told KCRA 3 at the time that he was waiting for that day, but only wanted to return under the right conditions.

“I wanted to come back when the house is renovated, when it is happy,” Cabrera said. “I like this house. It’s happy.”

Cabrera, one of the few people who could accurately describe the horror found in the house, went through KCRA 3, describing what was found in the research.

“And that would be called ‘The Death Room,'” Cabrera said during her 2013 tour as she stood in a bedroom. “She brought her victims here after she had caused drugs or alcohol. And you will put them here on the floor and they will stay here for days or weeks, we do not know.”

Pointing to a narrow staircase, Cabrera said, “The stairs, that’s how she took her victims, right here.”

How the Dorothea Puente case unfolded in Sacramento Source link How the Dorothea Puente case unfolded in Sacramento

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