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How did the McKinley Water Vault fare during Sunday’s storm?

Sunday’s historic rainfall across Sacramento tried McKinley Park’s new underground reservoir. The highly contested McKinley Water Vault was built by the city to reduce floods around McKinley Park in Sacramento. The Sacramento City Department of Public Interest said that by 5:30 pm Sunday evening during the storm, the 6 million gallon vault had been filled. Around McKinley Park, a street flood occurred when water began to overflow from the storm drains. By 9:40 pm, the safe began to empty. As of Tuesday evening, the pump had lowered the water level in the safe to about 8 feet of water. According to the city, the vault is 18 feet deep and is expected to be nearly drained by Wednesday. Councilor Jeff Harris says the vault was built for a decade of storm events. The city estimates that Sunday’s storm was a 500-year storm event. Despite floods and sewage flowing into the neighborhood, the councilor said the vault served its original purpose. “We really avoided the catastrophic floods here,” Harris said. “Without a vault, this storm would have caused unprecedented turmoil in the area.” A resident told KCRA 3 that the city did a “good job” in building a vault. He almost agreed and said he believed. His main concern is in the nearby confluence system that mixes rainwater and sewage. Melinda Johnson, who lives nearby, agrees. She said sewage waste made it along her property and her blocks during the recent storm. “All citizens deserve the right to a sewage-free environment,” Johnson said. “The city couldn’t provide it to the citizens around McKinley Park. It’s a shame they couldn’t do that,” Harris said, saying he was able to test the E. coli flood around McKinley Park when the water level rose. Retreated after the storm on Sunday. He said the crew was able to find feces in the water and disinfect and power wash blocks and halves of contaminated residential areas. He said it could take several days before damage and pollution were cleared, even if the storm was much smaller than the storm that flooded the area on Sunday before the vault was built. Stated. The city told KCRA 3 for the complex that water from storm drains around McKinley Park would flow into the vault, pumped to local sanitation facilities, processed and then discharged into the Sacramento River. The city’s public service bureau said it plans to begin improving storm drains in the winter. “The City’s Public Service Department will soon begin a project to improve storm sewers on East Sacramento’s Parkways 33 and 35. The project will be upgraded. Stormwater drains with valve flaps will drain water. It reduces the “spill” of the sewer system and seals the manhole cover to prevent it from moving during large storms. Residents and business owners adjacent to the project will be notified by the city. This winter, of the next work expected to continue until March 2022. The cost of the project is less than $ 127,000. ”

Sunday’s historic rainfall across Sacramento tried McKinley Park’s new underground reservoir. The highly contested McKinley Water Vault was built by the city to reduce floods around McKinley Park in Sacramento.

The Public Interest Business Bureau of Sacramento City By 5:30 on Sunday evening during the storm, the 6 million gallon vault was full.. Around McKinley Park, a street flood occurred when water began to overflow from the storm drains. By 9:40 pm, the safe began to empty.

As of Tuesday evening, the pump had lowered the water level in the safe to about 8 feet of water. According to the city, the vault is 18 feet deep and is expected to be nearly drained by Wednesday.

Councilor Jeff Harris says the vault was built for a decade of storm events. The city estimates that Sunday’s storm was a 500-year storm event. Despite floods and sewage flowing into the neighborhood, the councilor said the vault served its original purpose.

“We really avoided the catastrophic floods here,” Harris said. “Without a vault, this storm would have caused unprecedented turmoil in the region.”

A resident told KCRA3 that he almost agreed and believed that the city had done a “good job” in building the vault. His main concern is in the nearby confluence system that mixes rainwater and sewage.

Melinda Johnson, who lives nearby, agrees. She said sewage waste made it along her property and her blocks during the recent storm.

“All citizens deserve the right to a sewage-free environment,” Johnson said. “The city failed to provide it to the citizens around McKinley Park, and it’s a shame they can’t do it.”

The city was able to test a flood of E. coli around McKinley Park when water levels dropped after Sunday’s storm, Harris said. He said the crew was able to find feces in the water and disinfect and power wash blocks and halves of contaminated residential areas.

He said it could take several days before damage and pollution were cleared, even if the storm was much smaller than the storm that flooded the area on Sunday before the vault was built. Stated.

The city told KCRA3 that due to the complex system, water from storm drains around McKinley Park would flow into the vault, pumped to a local sanitation plant, processed and then discharged into the Sacramento River.

In a statement to KCRA 3, a spokesman for the city’s Public Interest Business Administration said it plans to begin improving storm drains in the winter.

“”The city’s Public Service Department will soon begin a project to improve storm drains on the Parkway in East Sacramento.rd And 35NSStreet. In this project, the stormwater drain will be upgraded with valve flaps to allow water to flow in to reduce the “outflow” of the combined sewer system and seal the manhole cover to keep the stormwater from moving during a storm. Residents and business owners adjacent to the project will be notified by the city of their next work, which is scheduled for this winter and will continue until March 2022. The cost of the project is less than $ 127,000. “

How did the McKinley Water Vault fare during Sunday’s storm? Source link How did the McKinley Water Vault fare during Sunday’s storm?

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